OT: What's this type of bracket called?

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
https://www.dropbox.com/s/b4b15o0hgno2ldu/bracket.jpg?dl=0

The perspective is a bit off - the angles at the end are about 45 degrees.

I made this one myself out of aluminium tubing, but I've already had one  
crack and break at the bend.

So I'm trying to buy a steel one, but I can't even figure out what to  
search for.

Sylvia.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 12:53 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Best of luck with an off the shelf replacement, Why not use some 5mm  
flat bar (steel) from a steel suppler and make it

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 1:31 pm, DBR wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm sure I've seen this kind of bracket in various applications. I  
suppose they may all be custom manufactured, but I'd have thought they  
were common enough to be something of a commodity item.

Sylvia.


Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 1:35 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Try tubular angle bracket.

--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 1:35 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


nuh. just get a short galvanised steel strip from bunnings for a few  
dollars, cut it to length if necessary, bend the two ends to the right  
angle, and drill holes for the screws.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

--  
"You're either with Knobbo or someone to be gotten rid of"- Alvey on noddy
"an irrelevant nobody pretending to be something he's not"- Clocky on noddy
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 16:21:04 +1100, felix wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That would work for tension, but not compression. The tubular nature  
gives it conpression strenth.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
 DBR wrote:


Quoted text here. Click to load it


 ** Huh ??  

  That ain't flat bar and it ain't 5mm.  


....  Phil  

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 2:10 PM, Phil Allison wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
But it would be within the ability of most people to bend flat bar and  
not crack it, Tube would require a little more skill and unless done  
well not be as strong. I would guess some 25x5 or possibly 19x5 would  
work well.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 1:23 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


It's just a generic support bracket ghat manufacturers make for specific  
applications. You won't find one on the shelf anywhere unless you get  
*really* lucky, and the reason why it's cracked is because you've made  
it out of the wrong material for the application at hand.

As DBR said, get yourself some 5mm flat bar (in whatever width you  
fancy), and make a replica out if that.


--  
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 2:09 pm, Noddy wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Here you go again, trying to make yourself relevant. Firstly, you have  
absolutely no idea what the *application at hand* is since it was never  
explicitly stated. You just wanted to make your statement sound  
impressive but all it's made you look like is a dick. And you're good at  
that!
Quoted text here. Click to load it
The bracket cracked because it was *work hardened* in the forming  
process and required annealing before and after to *reset* the aluminium  
and relax the internal stresses.

Didn't you ever do any metallurgy studies at Richmond Tech? Before you  
dropped out, that is!

--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 10/12/2019 07:23 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Many ladders have those as rung braces.

<
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IE8AAOSwXRhdXsCC/s-l1600.jpg


Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 1:23 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Try annealing it.

--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 4:19 pm, Xeno wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
A followup;

https://makeitfrommetal.com/how-to-anneal-aluminum-the-beginners-guide/

--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 4:19 pm, Xeno wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I was going to try that this afternoon. But my blow torch is empty.  
Strange, as I've barely used it. Slow leak? Or did the workmen I had on  
site for a couple of weeks just use it?

Another of life's mysteries to which an answer will probably never be known.

Sylvia.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 5:08 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's work hardening, that's why it is cracking. The annealing before and  
after should reduce the risk of that happening.

--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On Sun, 13 Oct 2019 13:23:19 +1100, Sylvia Else wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'd call it an angle bracket but I'd expect it hard to buy a pre-made  
version as there are so many variables.

What is the difficutly with making one in steel?
It looks like a simple vice clamp construction
Perhaps a blow torch might be needed to warm the steel to make it bend/
curve better rather than "tear" as the aluminium is doing.


Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 03:23, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Gallows bracket.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 1:23 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

OK, thanks guys.

I think I'll try the annealing approach first with aluminium. If it  
breaks again, I suppose I'll have to have go at the same method but with  
steel.

Sylvia.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/2019 10:59 pm, Sylvia Else wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Don't waste your time.

Whoever suggested annealing it is clueless as annealing aluminium is a  
very complex process compared to other metals such as steel or copper,  
and unless you know what type of aluminium you're using and what  
temperature to heat it to then you're going to achieve absolutely nothing.

The problem, as mentioned previously, is that you're using the wrong  
material for the device you're making. Aluminium tube does *not* like to  
be crushed and bent as you're doing, and no amount of "home annealing"  
will help you as aluminium needs to be heated to near melting point to  
achieve any kind of pliability. Quite simply, it is far to brittle a  
material to do with what you're looking to do, and all you'll manage to  
make is something that will fail like it already has.

You'll get far better results using thin wall steel tube while will be  
just as easy to form and bend and it can be done cold to the point you  
have in the picture without hurting it. Better yet get some 30x5 flat  
bar cut to length, bent and drilled as required and your problems will  
be solved forever.

Don't listen to me thought. Waste shitloads of time and money on  
something that can be fixed for 10 bucks worth of steel from Bunnings :)





--  
--
--
Regards,
Noddy.

Re: OT: What's this type of bracket called?
On 13/10/19 11:49 pm, Noddy wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

You *know* who suggested annealing Noddy. Sylvia was, quite naturally,  
thinking along the same lines. But thanks for proving yet again that you  
read *e v e r y  s i n g l e  w o r d  I  w r i t e*

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Complex? Who are you kidding? The *process* is detailed on the link *I*  
provided. Hardly complex, except maybe to you.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The method of temperature assessment provided in the link serves to  
determine the *appropriate* temperature regardless of the grade of  
aluminium.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

FWIW, the correct term is *ductility*.

All annealing, regardless of the material requires heating to near  
melting point. That is the whole point of the annealing process - heat  
the material *above* its *crystalisation temperature*. Any material that  
is extruded is work hardened so annealing serves to normalise the  
crystal lattice. The aim here is to improve the ductility of the material.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

How do you know what the task is? It wasn't detailed.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Work hardening will make most metals more brittle. Aluminium, in its  
normalised state, is quite a ductile material.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

One could ask why you intend to waste money on restoring a rusty car  
body that has absolutely no cachet, its only value being as scrap metal  
at Sims.


--  

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

Site Timeline