Telnet

And the best thing is... that OP never wrote anything after that initial post...
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic
Loading thread data ...
But you need a telnet client on Raspbian. Which apparently is doesn't have.
FWIW, further to my other post in the thread, the arm64 version of Ubuntu Server does have it installed by default :-).
Reply to
Pancho
nc (ncat or netcat) can do telnet and is installed in RaspianOS
--
Chris Elvidge 
England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
Yeah OK. I'm the only one on my private network (as far as I know....) and I never had a compromised system (except Chinese and American hardware....) but I always use ssh anyway.
Reply to
A. Dumas
My RPi, initially set up with jessie or wheezy, and then successively upgraded to Buster, does not have telnet installed.

--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
Not quite. Please get the basic Telnet RFC (RFC854) and have a look at the Telnet control functions definitions.
--

-TV
Reply to
Tauno Voipio
It works well enough for me.
--
Chris Elvidge 
England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
Not quite. Look up -t in the 'nc' man page.
Theo ;-)
Reply to
Theo
Frankly I used to use telnet, but all distros now favour ssh as a default, and at current network and CPU speeds the encryption doesn't adversely affect performance, so who needs telnet?
--
"What do you think about Gay Marriage?" 
"I don't." 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
The retro-computing crowd.
--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
They can look back in nostalgia. I was there. fuck that for a game of soldiers.
Like I don't miss carburettors and distributors one little bit, either.
Or engines that needed new bearings every 30, 000 miles and a rebore, regrind and new pistons at 90,000
--
"What do you think about Gay Marriage?" 
"I don't." 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Worked for me just now. (IPv6 address.)
Does anyone have that "video" as a file instead of streaming from there?
Elijah ------
formatting link
Reply to
Eli the Bearded
I use it (well nc actually) to remotely control VLC.
--
Chris Elvidge 
England
Reply to
Chris Elvidge
Oh good! I was using IPv4, no native IPv6 here and the tunnel messes up geo-ip.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Same, but yes, seems down on ipv4.
Might be prudent to save it somewhere, yes.
Reply to
A. Dumas
Thanks for all the responses. Telnet on my rpi is installed and working. a telnet daemon (telnetd) is running and working on my "other" machine. I can telnet 192.168.0.169 and connect. However, the "other" machine is exp ecting a vt100 type terminal. The raspberrypi is NOT acting like one. So I can see text but cursor linefeeds etc are not working. The last line of output is usually over written by the "other" machine prompt. A true vt100 works however. I need to get lxterm or whatever to be a vt100. xterm con nects too but isn't vt100. What am I missing?
The "other" machine is an Apple //e running A2OSX. No ssh there! It only supports unencrypted telnet :-) and cifsd only works with guest-only SMB1 servers. Again the rpi fails to make the cut. Windows works but I don't d o windows. --Steve
Reply to
nelsonse48
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote on 7/31/21 5:42 PM:
a wild guess :-)
the $TERM on the client is not set to vt100, probably expects xterm-256color responses...
-rasp
Reply to
Ralph Spitzner
There is a perfectly good reason for small embedded devices, as a Telnet daemon is far simpler and smaller than a SSH one.
--

-TV
Reply to
Tauno Voipio
The only thing (comms-wise) I don't miss from those days was the early green screen terminal protocols and 12 key hand punches for cards.
I was quite happy paper tape: tolerated teletypes and loved Flexowriters. Dropping a card deck was a bitch if there wasn't a handy card sorter or the cards didn't have sequence numbers, but scrambled paper tape was a breeze: hold onto one end, chuck the mess down a stair well and then wind it up again on a tape winder.
The early teletype replacements were fine too: they worked exactly like a 24 x 80 terminal display, but the early mainframe terminals only sent and received a whole screen at a time and some were dead slow, especially those using 3270 bisync or LU2 protocols: several terminals were typically multi-dropped on an often slow communal line, after hitting send you waited while the polling sequence got round to polling your terminal.
ICL kit could treat the 24x80 screen as an editable text page - so when programming you got sent 20 or so lines of text (space left at the bottom for adding lines) and edited the screen locally before hitting SEND to save that part of the file and receive the next chunk. Not pretty, but at least it beat the hell out of programming with 12 key card punches.
Finally getting a DEC VT100 or, better, a Wyse 140 terminal was wonderful!
--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
Yep, then the workspace filled up with keyboards and screens at odd heights and angles as you tried to fit all the terminals needed onto the desk space available and suddenly there was the 19" NCD X terminal - monochrome and marvellous, one screen one keyboard to rule them all. Fast forward to today and there are two 27" high definition colour[1] monitors attached to my work laptop which has enough oomph to emulate everything I ever connected a dumb terminal to without even noticing the load.
[1] Redundant these days I know - when was the last time you saw a monochrome monitor.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot

ElectronDepot website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.