Telnet

I want to telnet from my rpi (buster) to another computer as a 'VT100' (or similar, vt102 etc) terminal. I don't want to mess up my lxterminal for rpi use. Suggestions?
--Steve
Reply to
nelsonse48
Loading thread data ...
Putty is definitely an option for an old school vt100 that has a built in telnet client
--
"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, 
that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Try kermit. ckermit and gkermit are available as Raspian packages.
ckermit looks to be the original Columbia University version gkermit is a GPLed version.
Been a while since I just it, but you can specify the terminal protocol you want to use - IIIRC it defaults to VT100
You can also do file transfer with it - its relatively slow but error correction, retries, etc during file transfers are excellent.
It should work equally well as an interactive tool because it has to talk to the remote host well enough to handle logging in and, if you want to transfer files, starting, interacting with and stopping a remote Kermit session.
--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
Isn?t xterm a superset of vt100? I?m not sure why you think you need to do anything special.
--
https://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/
Reply to
Richard Kettlewell
I saw this:
The communication program C-Kermit (sometimes just called kermit) doesn't do terminal emulation for Linux (in 2006). But Kermit can emulate many terminals in its non-free MS Windows versions so you`ll see lots of claims that Kermit can do terminal emulation. With Linux, it's merely a semi-transparent pipe between whatever terminal you are on and the remote site you are connected to. Thus if you use kermit on a Linux PC the terminal type will be "Linux".
on
formatting link

Reply to
A. Dumas
Dana Thu, 29 Jul 2021 12:12:24 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com napis'o:
Just type telnet other.machine.ip
you have to enable telnetd on other machine.
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic
I didn't know that: I initially used it to move files between an OS-9/68000 box and Windows, though I'm also certain that I've used it to pull files from the OS/9 system onto a Linux system, but don't recall which end I'd have driven that from, but I do have distant memories of setting the terminal type when doing that. It was a long time ago: both OS/9 and Linux had termcap installed and still do. Back in the day I may not have had curses/ncurses installed as that wasn't available for OS/9.
--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
You got me looking. Its based on VTE which is a superset of a vt102.
--
"A point of view can be a dangerous luxury when substituted for insight  
and understanding". 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Nikolaj Lazic wrote on 30-07-2021 at 01:26:
Yeah, I'm not sure we understand OP's problem, seems nothing is needed to just go ahead and do it. (I found telnet in my path on latest RaspiOS but I don't remember if I manually installed it.) Unless it *has* to be a certain, specific terminal emulation.
Of course, if this is via a public network in any way, then always use ssh instead of telnet.
Reply to
A. Dumas
Even on a private network, unless you trust everyone using it *and* are sure that there are no compromised systems on it.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Dana Fri, 30 Jul 2021 12:58:27 +0200, A. Dumas napis'o:
He wrote "from my rpi to another computer"... surely local. So... nothing is needed except telnet.
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic
Though given that ssh is there by default why not use that, telnet doesn't really offer any advantage.
--
Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
Yes. I did install a telnet demon on a machine a few years back. But frankly who uses it today - I even use ssh between machines on the same network behind a firewall
Pretty sure sshd is enabled by default on a Raspian pi. I don't recall actually enabling it on mine.
And since it runs headless the first thing I did after I flashed te RAM card was to ssh into it
Using a gnome terminal/console which is itself pretty much the same as lxterm I think
--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. 
In practice, there is. 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
er no, so nothing is needed except *ssh*.
Which comes by default whereas telnet daemons do not
$telnet mipifi Trying 192.168.0.200... telnet: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection refused
$ssh mipifi xxx@mipifi's password:
The only thing I use telnet for is to extract stats from my router that snmp cant reach.
Why it doesnt have ssh lord only knows.
--
All political activity makes complete sense once the proposition that  
all government is basically a self-legalising protection racket, is  
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
It's installed but not enabled, you either have to start it from the GUI or as follows (copied from raspberrypi.org):-
For headless setup, SSH can be enabled by placing a file named ssh, without any extension, onto the boot partition of the SD card from another computer. When the Pi boots, it looks for the ssh file. If it is found, SSH is enabled and the file is deleted. The content of the file does not matter; it could contain text, or nothing at all.
--
Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
Yes. I remember I had to quite a lot of stuff in that way (putting stuff in the boot partition) - for setting up wifi as well..
What amazed me was that following the instructions carefully and inserting the card and booting, about a minute later ssh into the Pi zero W 'just worked'.
--
"First, find out who are the people you can not criticise. They are your  
oppressors." 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Nope. After your write the Raspbian image to the SSD, you have to save an empty file named ssh to the root folder of the SD card. I did it wrong, which is always a good aide-memorie.
I did that two years ago. About a month or two ago, I changed a couple of rpis to Ubuntu Server (still not sure if that was a good idea, bad idea or irrelevant). I have no idea how that SSH works on that, but it does, so I guess I got it right :-).
Reply to
Pancho
Hmm towel.blinkenlights.nl appears to be down so yes telnet is running out of uses.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
It seems that a Telnet client is not in the standard install of Raspbian (Raspi OS). You can install it:
sudo apt install telnet
After installation, just start it from the terminal:
telnet tar_get_machine_ip_or_name
For connecting to another computer, you do not need the Telnet server (daemon).
--

-TV
Reply to
Tauno Voipio
He needs telnet daemon on OTHER machine.
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic

ElectronDepot website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.