RPi media center

I currently have an RPi 3B Raspbian w/ 1600x900 monitor & computer
speakers connecting via wifi to broadband cable in my computer room.
I'm considering learning about using it as a media center using a Blu
android phone and Kore for remote by temporarily leaving it in the
computer room and connecting RPi w/ gigabit ethernet. I'm thinking that
instead of Raspbian I should put LibreElec on a card to replace the
Raspbian card.
Then, if that works out for Kodi/ LibreElec, I can move the RPi to the
living room w/ the bigscreen and go back to wifi.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
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Mike,
I thought the same, if only for it to have a TV-sized font. But it turned out that the LibreElec image includes configuration files. That makes it hard to change settings (you need to unpack the image, edit the configuration and than repack the image again :-( ).
Just thought you should know.
Regards, Rudy Wieser
Reply to
R.Wieser
Op 01-08-19 om 22:02 schreef R.Wieser:
I wouldn't worry about this, my guess is that Rudy has very specific & ingrained wishes/uses for his computers that won't matter to you. Just switch the card and see how it goes, easy enough.
Reply to
A. Dumas
Alexandre,
You would be guessing wrong I'm afraid.
The only thing I tried to do is to change the an offered preference in the way a list of stuff was sorted. While I could do that, the setting got lost every time I restarted.
Regards, Rudy Wieser
P.s. If you know how I can set a large font (good for TV viewing) for Raspbian I would be much obliged. Currently I have to move nearer to the TV to read the standard desktop text. :-\
Reply to
R.Wieser
I guess I won't understand what you mean until I do it.
I see that the dl for my RPi3B is Kodi 18.2 (Linux Kernel 4.19.x) LibreELEC-RPi2.arm-9.0.2.img.gz
If I use such as the libreelec sd/usb creator tool* for any win/linux/mac it will use that .gz and write it to the SD that I'll put into a USB/SD gizmo and then I'll be able to just remove/replace the Raspbian sd w/ the libreelec sd and boot the RPi.
Is there something I'm missing here?
*
formatting link
To create bootable USB or SD Card installation media for any LibreELEC supported platform please download the ?LibreELEC USB-SD Creator? app and run it with administrator rights.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
Mike,
The problem is not with running LibreElec, but with that its configuration files are saved in RAM, and discarded when you turn the Pi off - to be re-extracted from/with the libreelec kernel image the next time you boot.
And by the way: I took a noobs image, copied that to an USB stick and, on first boot, selected LibreElec to be installed (instead of Raspbian). Easy peasy. :-)
Regards, Rudy Wieser
Reply to
R.Wieser
Hmmm. This page sounds like it can save settings in 6 different categories
formatting link
System Network Connections Services Bluetooth About
Yeah; I tho't that would probably work. Recalling from the installation of Raspbian from noobs.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
Which desktop are you running? Its possible to make the font larger in all the various Pi desktops (Pixel, LXDE, Mate, etc), but it requires editing config files on the simpler ones, where as the more sophisticated ones, such as Mate, have dialogs to set fonts for the different Window components. You'll need at least a Pi 3B to run the more complex desktops comfortably.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Mike,
The setting I referred to is related to a default -installed plugin (YouTube). Can't remember what /exactly/ it was, but it had to do with ... ah yes, the way the movies where displayed. I tried to change it from the default "wall" (IIRC) to one of the two (three?) other ways.
I googled how I could get the setting to stick, and got the unpack-edit-repack method suggested. That, together with not being able to add stuff I was planing to write myself, made me drop it and go back to Rapbian.
Regards, Rudy Wieser
Reply to
R.Wieser
Druck,
Not at all sure I'm afraid, the one that came with Noobs 2.4.4 (stretch). GTK3+ ?
I do not even know how I can check that I'm afraid ... I remember I tried (to figure out which libraries I needed to install), but got nowhere. Do you have any suggestions to where I can find the specs (Board, OS, window manager, etc) ?
As far as I know I do. A 3B+ IIRC.
Regards, Rudy Wieser
Reply to
R.Wieser
I like inxi which is installed by default. It is a script w/ myriad features. If you run inxi -h it will tell you what all it can do. You can get brief info about the System w/ inxi -S. I'll go over to mine and install Claws so I can post to this ng from Raspbian.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
From Raspbian Claws:
$ inxi -S System: Host: raspberrypi Kernel: 4.14.98-v7+ armv7l (32 bit) Desktop: LXDE (Openbox 3.6.1) Distro: Raspbian GNU/Linux 9 (stretch)
Inxi is unable to give some M/m report because:
If one of these directories is missing, inxi may have incomplete output:
/sys/class/dmi/id (info: -M system, motherboard, bios)... Missing
I don't yet have Claws auto-signature business figured out; so I'll manually do it.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
Ha. Got it. There is more than one place to configure a template.
Now I need to figure out how to make xkbset hold the stickykeys past the expiry. I tho't I could;
xkbset st xkbset exp =st
But the sticky keeps 'going away'.
Raspbian's OpenBox LXDE doesn't have a stickykeys in its keyboard settings nor an accessibility feature.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
OK this is better (I think/hope);
xkbset st xkbset exp st
$ xkbset q | grep Sticky-Keys Sticky-Keys = On
$ xkbset q exp | grep Sticky-Keys Upon Expiry Sticky-Keys will be: On
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
Running Mate on an Intel deskto[p machone couled to a TV as a makeshift satellelite TV i was never able to get the fonts readable at a distance no matter what I selected. I cant remember why but siomething happened at large fonts level that made it unreadable
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Canada is all right really, though not for the whole weekend. 

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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
On Sat, 3 Aug 2019 01:49:48 +0100, The Natural Philosopher declaimed the following:
What type of font where you using. Core X-window fonts were bitmaps, as I recall, and forcing them to a large size could result in lots of jagged edges.
If using scalable (PostScript/TrueType/OpenType) using Freetype to render should have been somewhat better looking, though X-window seems to favor 75 and 100 DPI (essentially original 72point/pixel Mac and 96pixel M$ Windows resolutions).
formatting link

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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
No, that was not the problem. IIRC what happened was that icons on the desktop simply didnt have space allocated for the text so it got clipped
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
[snip]
[snip]
I had a play with Kodi.
One thing about it that I definitely DO NOT LIKE is that it takes a perfectly usable computer (the Pi) and dumbs it down by giving it the GUI of a bargain-basement consumer device (with all the incomprehensibility and being operable only by children that that entails).
The Pi is a computer ... It has a keyboard and a mouse ... why would I want to try to control it with a less expressive input device like an infra-red TV remote?
I wiped Kodi and went back to Raspbian.
--
Cheers, 
 Daniel.
Reply to
Daniel James
According to the Kodi description, it wants to embrace the UI paradigm of the 'ten foot interface'.
So, I would picture some Kodi 'fiends' as wanting to sit back in their easy chair in front of a big screen TV and surround sound speakers to get 'big' audio and video experiences.
The kb/mouse doesn't actually quite fit that 10' paradigm.
Personally, I'm a 'desktop' person whose computer/online experiences are full-sized keyboard and mouse and monitor and I don't even (normally) use a cellphone. My home phones are 'upgraded' (to VoIP) landline cordless phones and there are 'old' landline corded and cordless phones all over the house, all now voip.
So, I'm not really 'into' using a handheld touchscreen device to interface w/ what I'm doing, BUT...
... I can see some 'uses' for such a concept, ie witness the cellphone users who 'do everything' w/ their cell.
There was a time long ago that I was very much into audio and video 'power'. I could imagine doing some of that again digitally w/ the little Pi at the heart of the matter.
It might be that LibreElec isn't the ideal way to achieve that paradigm. There are others such as OSMC or Xbian.
Or, maybe my first step should be Kodi on Raspbian w/ desktop interface, then Kodi on a libreelec-like in the computer room, then kodi-libreelec at the big screen.
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Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter
On Raspbian, inxi -M doesn't give much of a report because there is no /sys/class/dmi/id, but raspbian *does* have dmidecode by default; inxi --recommends says what default raspbian has and doesn't.
Whereas, on another Deb such as MX (which is XFCE rigged), it has a good inxi -M report because it does have /sys/class/dmi/id.
--
Mike Easter
Reply to
Mike Easter

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