64Gbyte flash memory - hot stuff, unfortunately

vi can run a shell command, launch a shell or even paste the output from a shell command into the current file.
Reply to
Rob Morley
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It can also pipe some or all of the text through a shell command and replace it with the result, which is occasionally very handy if you can remember the incantations to make it happen.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
I usually have two or three command windows open, so I don't find that feature all that exciting.
I have Windows equivalents of most *n*x utilities; it eases the pain somewhat.
There's one thing I miss in vi that's standard in GUI editors: the ability to cut/copy and paste between two different windows.
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Reply to
Charlie Gibbs
Lol. When I run Emacs under Windows, it opens a command line window in addition to the GUI window, if you can call that a GUI window.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
You miss that in Linux? That surprises me. I have just opend one 4DOS and one MS-DOS command window and copied and pasted between them. Worked perfectly (but needed the mouse to do it, no ).
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Reply to
Axel Berger
I have a board sitting right here with an MSP430FR4133 that has 15 kB of FRAM on board and other members of the family have up to 128 kB of FRAM along with a lot of other "stuff", all running at up to 8 MHz with no wait states. Pretty amazing how far technology advances with time. If I had any ASR33 terminals I would connect it all up! Instead I think I'll connect it to a one square inch solar cell and run it with no external power and no battery. ;)
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
Yes, and moved on in other ways too. IIRC that roomful (1904S CPU, disk controller, 2xEDS60, 8x tapedrive, 1x 1250lpm LP, 1x 900 cpm card reader, 1/paper tape reader, 1x scanner) ate around 40KW - and I have no idea how much power the computer room's aircon needed.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
That works fine up to a screenful. I can sympathise with Charlie if he'd like to set a mark and do a few page downs, then yank from the mark, then paste that somewhere else.
Sadly for me, vi is my only option - can't access our AIX box other than through a terminal emulator and there's no NFS/Samba shares on it. At my PPoE, I was able to map straight onto a share and used Textpad to edit files, which was a lot quicker way to work for me than using vi.
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Mike Fleming
Reply to
Mike Fleming
Easy enough to do, say you want the next 70 lines then:
"a70yy :e t "aP :w :rew
Then in the other window
:r t :!rm t
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Thanks for that. I haven't gotten into the more advanced features of vi, and I suspected there had to be something that would do the job.
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/~\  cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid (Charlie Gibbs) 
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Reply to
Charlie Gibbs
I don't know AIX at all, so question: does it support SSH and/or FTP? If so, it might be a pain, but you could at least suck files files back to you local box to do large and/or multi-file extensive edits of the type that involve moving large chunks of text between files.
If you're allowed to install another editor you could consider trying microEmacs, which runs in a standard Xterm window. This usually emulates VT-220, but as it uses termcap, it can be easily ported to almost any system with a C compiler: my OS-9 system used a physical Wyse 160 terminal. It is easily configurable (its configuration file allows macros to be defined and called) and, relevant for this discussion, the number of files it cam edit at once is only limited by process memory and of course it can cut and paste between files and spawn shells if you need them. I first met it as the standard system editor on Microware's OS-9 real-time OS and have ported it to everything from MSDOS and early Windows versions to Linux via a few other UNIXs. My customised configuration file has worked in all these environments without any changes being needed.
And, to stay on topic, its my standard editor on my RPi as well as on my Fedora boxes.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie
What is with all the BS of adding a simple line at the end of a post to use the three letters, "rpi" as if that makes it any better when posting off topic?
If you are going to post off topic, at least mark your post OT and it would be better if you moved it to a new thread.
Personally I don't care so much, but I've seen half a dozen posts that cop out at the end and add a footnote to make them somehow "compliant". What is the point of making an OT post longer with a mention of the Raspberry Pi when the entire post has nothing to do with the rPi?
This isn't intended to be about Martin, as I said, I've seen a number of these posts in this thread.
Ok, rant over. Feel free to ignore me. :S
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
The scheduling program had a few requirements that would have been difficult to meet with an appointment book made from dead trees:
1) The scheduling program was accessed by multiple (Hazeltine) terminals in different rooms, often simultaneously.
2) The schedule needed to be updated on the fly during a shift.
3) The cable had nearly a dozen operating channels fed from over a dozen VCRs and a few open-reel (1/2" and 1") video tape machines. The algorithm to determine where/when a playback could be scheduled was too complex to be done by gray matter without an unacceptably high error rate.
Now, if the Raspberry Pi had been available at that time (1979-1980), a whole lot more cool stuff could have been done. (Had to do something to keep the discussion on topic. :-)
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Robert Riches 
spamtrap42@jacob21819.net 
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Reply to
Robert Riches
I find the telephone is good for that. It's often that people don't mind waiting a minute to schedule something.
Yes, a pencil makes updates very easy.
Really? Sounds pretty simple to me. Each device being scheduled has a column vs. time on the vertical axis. Machines can only be scheduled while there are no more than the available number of channels in use.
Sorry, still off topic.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
For anyone puzzled that's:
yank 70 lines into a buffer called a open a file called t (which shouldn't exist) paste the buffer save the file go back to the original
and
read the file called t delete it
Of course if you're working in multiple xterms (or similar) you can just use X cut and paste - but remember to :set noai in the destination otherwise auto-indent is likely to make things messy.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
And when you've got one file on one machine and the other on the other? Good solution for them being on the same one though.
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Mike Fleming
Reply to
Mike Fleming
Thats not a feature of vi, its a feature of the terminal emulator you are using.
On my (mint) system it certainly works OK
Even from two bash shells.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
on my emulators ctrl-shift-V pastes and ctrl-shift-C copies. there is no cut of course,
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
It's a Unix variant. It supports them. It supports shares as well. However, I'd be in trouble if I started trying to set up shares or running an FTP daemon. If was good enough 25 years ago, it's good enough now.
No Xterm, and I can't install anything. Including in Windows, so I'd be stuck with Wordpad, which isn't really a significant advance on vi.
It's a PITA but doesn't actually stop me doing the work. And I keep my hand in on vi, so I can use it on the Pi.
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Mike Fleming
Reply to
Mike Fleming
formatting link

AIX will run NFS, samba, sshd, and/or ftpd.
I'd probably use sshd, and sftp... I use that to securely mount my remote server over the internet.
Unless it was right next to me in which case NFS.
My use of samba has reduced to occasionally firing it up to allow a portable MASC to access the data.
And then spending a week deleting all the historic printers the MAC has ever connected to, that its incompetent owner has set to be exported to any local CUPS system.
But I digress.
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The New Left are the people they warned you about.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

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