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Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Joerg Lorenz actually said:

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Jeorg Lorenz,

Why do you pollute this thread with your worthless OT drivel?
You don't know the answer to *any* question asked.
Not one.

Yet, Jeorg Lorenz you pollute the thread nonetheless.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
nospam posted for all of us...


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Yeah, some single mother needs this to stimulate the economy.

--  
Tekkie

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
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The japanese vehicle you can drive and drive without doing any maintenance and
it won't break until all of a sudden everything fails.  The BMW requires a lot  
of very specific maintenance, and you need to keep on top of that maintenance,  
and if you do not do it, it will break.  But, you can drive it for a long, long
time before everything fails.

Maintenance is better than repairs any day, though.
--scott

--  
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Scott Dorsey actually said:

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To put the difference more honestly, I've had both vehicles for more than
15 years each so I know their personalities well.

The Toyota almost never breaks down, but when it does, the fix is generally
simple and easy to do where parts are easy to find and relatively
inexpensive. Yet, it doesn't handle as well (although it's a different type
of vehicle altogehter).  

But here are the "problems" I've had with the Toyta:
1. The transmission shift lever uses idiotic plastic bushings (replaced 2x)
2. The sway bar used buna rubber bushings (replaced with poly bushings)
3. The electrical antenna keeps breaking (I finally gave up on it)
4. The torsion clutch pedal spring is stupid (replaced with linear spring)
5. The digital clock digits go out (gave up after fixing it twice)
6. The oil filter housing gasket leaks (fixed by replacing it)
8. The door opening mechanism failed (replaced with OEM)
9. The front shocks were toast within five years (replaced w Bilsteins)
10. The rear brakelight stopped working (sanded a few times & is now fixed)
Plus assorted standard maintenance (belts, clutch, fluids, brakes, etc.).

The bimmer constantly breaks down, but its handling is nice. However, it's
important to know that the bimmer I have is the E39 which has about 20
items made like crap, where *everything* else is rock solid.

So the twenty items made like crap on the E39 are, offhand:
1. The cooling system (mostly the idiotic plastic expansion tank)
2. The DISA valve (mostly an idiotic plastic flap pin)
3. The window regulators (two idiotic plastic rollers)
4. The Bosch ABS control module (an idiotic internal wire badly mounted)
5. The seats twist (idiotic sleeves on the many motor control cables)
6. Instrument cluster pixels die (idiotic pink stickytape connectors)
7. The headlight adjustment (idiotic plastic adjustment pins break)
8. AC control (idiotic FSU/FSR blows its mosfets time and time again)
9. CCV (aka PCV) (idiotic design creates mayonaise in cold weather locales)
10. Doors leak water (idiotic lack of glue in the vapor barrier adhesive)
11. Trunk wiring (utterly idiotic design has no concept of opening flex!)
12. Temperature (idiotic placement of the ambient temperature sensor)
13. Windshiled washer system (the entire design is idiotic)
14. Jack pads (idiotic lack of a center pin was replaced under TSB)
15. AC odors (idiotic lack of a way to vent collected water)
16. The cupholders (idiotic design can't be fixed - just throw it away)
17. Wood trim (idiodic material was never tested for lifespan)
18. Windshield molding (idiotic use of recycled rubber was a disaster)
19. Power steering leaks (idiotic design of the I6 hoses & V8 brackets)
20. The front shocks were toast within its first year (warranty fix)
Plus assorted standard maintenance (belts, clutch, fluids, brakes, etc.).

My summary, after owning both from new for over fifteen years each is that
the BMW is a pain in the ass to repair whenever something does go wrong,
and things go wrong a lot because BMW doesn't know how to design a complete
car but the handling is phenominal and the engine is bulletproof.

Meanwhile, the Toyota is a dream child to repair when something does go
wrong (which is almost never) simply because Toyota knows something BMW
doesn't know, which is how to design a complete vehicle.

But all this is OT.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
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wrong (which is almost never) simply because Toyota knows something BMW
doesn't know, which is how to design a complete vehicle. "

It gets better than that. I used to work with a guy from Poland. Said he co
uld not believe how  many tools you need for cars in the US, which includes
 Toyotas. Says the ones they sell over there come apart with like a half do
zen wrenches while here you need all kinds of Torx and whatever else they c
an invent.  

For reasons beyond the scope of this text which is already beyond the scope
 of this thread, people over there have more of a tendency to fix their own
 stuff. Seems people in the US are getting lazy, to the point where they wi
ll jiggle the handle on the toilet for ten years rather than to adjust it.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
John Harmon posted for all of us...


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The BMW sounds like a great value... Have you considered having it bronzed?

--  
Tekkie

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Tekkie? actually said:

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Tekkie,

Why do you constantly pollute this thread with your worthless drivel?
You don't know the answer to *any* question asked.
Not one.

Yet, you pollute the thread nonetheless.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
John Harmon posted for all of us...


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I know the answers as I have done alignments in the past.

You have repeatedly been given excellent answers without learning.

I think you are a troll and are polluting this thread. Why don't you go over  
to a BMW group? They are probably not as patient as we are.

I will post what you consider is drivel since you are a troll. I am glad you  
are the arbiter of this news group, keep up the lousy job.

I suggest that all this trolls "questions" have been answered many times and  
any more replies be treated as such, but that's just me.
--  
Tekkie

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home

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Many of these are known problems.  Things like the cooling system you need
to plan to replace, and not just the expansion tank but also the thermostat
body.  You may want to consider one of the aftermarket water pumps that do
not fail also, when it comes time to do your next water pump replacement.

If you haven't replaced your air plenum, you're probably about time for
doing that to do.  Do it before it fails.

These are _maintenance_ items that you know are going to fail, not  
_repair_ items that you fix when they break.  You know it's going to happen,
deal with it before it fails.

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There's an aftermarket retrofit for this also.

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There'a sheet on that one. you're supposed to clean it when you change your
oil.  And yes, you're supposed to change your oil often.  Follow the extreme
service schedule in the book or get the "old school maintenance" schedule
from the BMWCCA.

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Again, a lot of these are maintenance items, others (like the wood trim)
I haven't heard of.

You should be on your third set of windshield molding by now if you are
replacing it according to normal schedule and keeping the car outside.

The power steering leaks again are what you get if you don't purge the
system annually like the manual says and don't change the hoses when they
start to fail.  By now you should have replaced every rubber part under
the hood at least once.  If you haven't replaced the pads in the shock
towers and the differential mount, do them now.  

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Most of these things that went wrong are things that a mechanic familiar
with the vehicle should have expected to go wrong and should have taken
care of before they went wrong.

Yes, there's a lot of stuff to do every 3,000 miles including checking
the rubber parts.  Yes, there's a transmission fluid change and differential
fluid change every 30,000 miles.  Yes, you need to change your brake fluid
every two years and your coolant every fall.  There is a _lot_ of maintenance
on these cars.

Do maintenance and you will not have to do so many repairs.
--scott

--  
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Scott Dorsey actually said:

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Hi Scott,

I'm extremely familiar with the BMW, but only you and I seem to know what
we're talking about here.

Unlike Tekkie, nospam, & Jeorg Lorens (who can only troll), I'm intimately
familiar that the cooling system overhaul is a standard maintenance item on
the E39, E38, and E46 (all of which use essentially the same Meyle and
Nissan components) and I am also intimately familiar with the metal-vaned
(petersburgh) water pumps.  

The gasket-less MAP thermostat isn't all that bad, but since the water pump
has to be removed anyway, we replace them as a matter of course during the
overhauls (I've done about four overhauls of my entire cooling system
myself).  

We all have the special counterholding tools for the fan clutch removal and
we often replace the mechanical or hydraulic tensioners (it's arbitrary
which any one bimmer has) and serpentine belt at the same time since all
that stuff has to come off anyway.

We have it down to a science. In fact, most of us have replaced the
expansion tank cap (I think the ORM is 1.2 bar but I'd have to look that
up) with a lower pressure cap, which doesn't prevent anything from
happening *other* than when it blows, it blows out the cap at a lower
pressure so the expansion tank seams don't split.

We also all know to keep the coolant level LOW (at or below the max at all
times) since too many people overfill the expansion tank. Admittedly, when
it's full, it *looks* empty but that is the way it was designed.

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I appreciate the advice, but offhand I'm not sure what you're calling the
"air plenum", but if you're talking about that idiotically designed DISA
valve which moderates the intake manifold harmonics, I'm completely
familiar with the DISA valve engineering flaws and have long ago replaced
the innards with re-engineered ones from Gary at German Engineering
(replace the plastic pin with titanium).  

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Again, you and I are probably the only people on this thread who understand
what we're talking about so I'm extremely familiar which what breaks on the
typical E39, E38, and E46 (which are all essentially the same depending on
the years designed).  


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There are *tons* of aftermarket FSUs, but I'm not aware of any design
change to any other component than the FSU itself.

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This one I'm also intimately familiar with, simply because, if you know the
bimmer, you know one of the most difficult standard jobs is to overhaul the
CCV because it's in the middle of the engine so to speak.  

What we have all done is we have modified our oil dipstick tubes, because
the CCV dumps cold oil into the dipstick tube, which hardens with contact
with water vapor into the extremely badly designed teeny tiny
concentric-circle space in the two-tubed dipstick.  

Also we've all changed the CCV components into the modified cold-weather
ones (insulated) but they're a bear to put in because they're fatter and
there's precious little room in the first place.

Suffice to say that you and I are the only two people here who actually
know what we're talking about (Tekkie, nospam, Jeorg, and a bunch of the
other fools don't have a clue what we're talking about when they bash BMW).

It's nice to know that there are some intelligent people here.
Thanks for being intelligent!

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I left off a few things because that was an ad-hoc list, but just like the
fact that *all* the cluster and MID pixels go bad, all the wood trim
cracks.  

It's not actually the wood that cracks; it's the super thick coating of
varnish on the outside that cracks. It's a warranty repair and I had all my
wood trim replaced under warranty, but the replacement wood trim cracked
just the same.  

It's a manufacturing and design flaw that they all have.

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The good news about the windshield molding is that it doesn't affect
anything other than looks and noise. It's not a weather item so it doesn't
keep out water.

The bad news is that the Germans use too much recycled rubber, which is the
problem with that windshield molding.

Again, I'm impressed that you're the only one on this newgroup who knows
what he is talking about with respect to bimmers. You'll find I know my
model extremely well (probably better than almost any non mechanic you have
ever met).

That's because I "think" about what I'm doing.  
And I collaborate with others to learn from them.

Which is the reason, after all, for this thread.

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I have done an overhaul of the rubber from buna to viton long ago, and the
worst were the SAP/SAS valves in the back of the intake manifold. They're
impossible to get to under the best of circumstances.  

The power steering isn't so bad if you clean the power steering reservoir
filter once every few oil changes with gasoline (most people don't know
that it's even there) and if you replace the oetiker (sp?) clamps with
standard hose clamps and replace the hoses.

The V8 has special problems with the power steering pump bracket breaking,
so a standard maintenance item is to check the bolts every oil change.

The I6 isn't bleedable so you have to suck the fluid out the reservoir with
a turkey baster, but it's not all that bad to do. It's just ATF Dexron IV
(now Dexton VI since Dexron IV lost its copyright long ago).
  
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I learned of all the issues by running into them and then learning how to
re-engineer them. My point is that most of these known problems span
models, so, BMW *knows* that they build crappy components but they don't
fix them. So that's just bad engineering on BMW's part.

All BMW cares about is the handling and performance, and, those components
are engineered fantastically well.

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I disagree with *some* of what you just wrote.  

Most bimmer owners have learned NOT to change the "lifetime" transmission
fluid for two key reasons. The first is that many people have had failures
just *after* changing the fluid where the hypothesis is that "stuff" got
mixed up and moved about (like crud). The second is that it's actually not
trivial to change the transmission fluid because of the specific
temperature requirements (which most people skip).  

Just like most people skip the 500 pounds of weight to set the ride height
to "normal" when aligning the car, most people skip steps when changing the
transmission fluid - and problems arise as a result.

But I do agree that BMW used crappy BUNA rubber for things that get hot,
such as the valve cover gasket (which fails on almost every engine!). BMW
has since replaced BUNA with Viton but they didnt' tell their customers
that so for years customers were replacing the buna VCG with another crappy
buna VCG.

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BTW, are you the "Magnum" "Scott" of BMW fame?
If so, we actually know each other and we have common friends who have both
beemers and bimmers.

Either way, it's a *pleasure* to speak with someone who is not only
intelligent, but who knows what he's talking about (which most of the fools
in this thread don't).

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
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What I am talking about is mostly that maintenance and repairs are different,
and there are vehicles that require a lot of maintenance and if you don't
do that maintenance you get repairs.

Maintenance you can do at your convenience in a heated or air-conditioned
garage.   Repairs are not so clean.

The Japanese cars... you don't do a lot of maintenance, instead you do a
lot of repairs all at once.  The BMW, you do a lot of maintenance.

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I mean the big rubber hose going between the throttle body and the airflow
sensor.  It cracks and then the airflow data becomes invalid and the car
starts running lean.  You can patch the cracks with 3M weatherstripping
adhesive for a while until after a while you can't.

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The issue on this one is that the they are using that TO220 FET as a linear
regulator to adjust the voltage on the motor, and it develops a lot of heat
of course.  In Germany it's not a problem, but in Florida it fails pretty
promptly.  There are a couple places that have retrofit ones with big  
heatsinks.  There have been a couple people talking about making PWM retrofits
but nobody has done it yet that I know.

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If you are changing oil every 3,000 miles you shouldn't need to do any
of this.  Just swab it out when you cahnge.

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Tried Formby's Furniture Refinisher or maybe just xylene on it to liquify
the varnish and redistribute it?

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This might be the same issue as the fan controller and the exterior rubber:
stuff that works just fine in the German climate but doesn't do so well in
places in the US.

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If you keep changing the fluid, the rack seals don't fail.  If you don't
change the fluid, the rack seals will fail.  Changing to viton isn't a bad
idea at all, but constant maintenance reduces the need to do that.

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I would tend to disagree, with a few exceptions like the cooling system
which really IS shameful.

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Okay, I was making the assumption of the manual transmission.  Why would
anyone get a BMW and then put a slushbox in it?

If you DO have a slushbox, regular fluid changes are even MORE important
although not at as short intervals, because if you don't do it regularly
while the transmission is young, you're going to get exactly into that
situation when the transmission is old.  (Note also that a fluid change
is NOT the same as a complete flush.... the complete flush is a bad idea
in any case... just drain what comes out and refill it.  It won't change
all the fluid in the case but that's okay because you're going to do it
again soon enough anyway).

Agreed that if you're stuck with a high mileage automatic that has been
abused in its youth by a lack of proper fluid changes that the best thing
to do is just keep your fingers crossed and hope it doesn't fail.  (Well,
really the best thing to do is trade in the car before it does fail but
that's another story).

This is a case of repairs vs. maintenance again.

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Nope, I'm just a guy who likes to drive cars for a long time, and I like
BMWs for the reason that if you do put the proper maintenance into them
you can just keep driving and driving them.  I just rolled over 360,000
mile on the E28 this week coming home from work and it's still almost new.

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I don't claim to be intelligent, I just claim to be able to keep cars running.
A good argument could be made that if I were intelligent I would have traded
the E28 in twenty years ago and I wouldn't be driving the 2002 at all.
Certainly my wife makes that argument often.
--scott

--  
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Scott Dorsey actually said:

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Oh, yeah. I know it all too well.  

My first smoke test for a lean condition showed a crack on the *underside*
of that large ribbed tube. A few years later, my second smoke test showed
that the tubes sticking out had leaks.

It would have been cheaper to just replace the damn things, instead of
doing all those expensive smoke tests, which was your point, I agree!

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Maybe you can answer a question which has irked me for years.
As you know, the AC/Heating system is "fully automatic" meaning it's not
intended for manual control, so, the blower starts at whatever settting it
wants to start at when you start the car, no matter what setting you left
it at when you last shut down the car.

I *always* adjust that, either to *off* or to the midway position.

But what I always wondered was, if the blower is on at all, whether the
full on, or midway position caused less stress on the FSU?

I'm guessing from something a guy named cn90 and jim cash wrote that I
found by googling, that the midway position is least stressful for that
TO220 FET (there are three of those MOSFETs aren't there?).

Which blower position do you think is least stressful on that MOSFET driver
if the blower is on?

1 bar
5 bars
10 bars

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I know when my FSU failed the first time, it was so hot I burned my hand
trying to get it out of those Germanic clips. The second one failed without
heat, as did the others (where they failed in a way that gave the AC/heater
controls a mind of their own).  

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Nope. I didn't know about that trick. Maybe I'll try since it's just the
varnish that is cracked.
  
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The ABS "trifecta" failing on the E38, E39, and E46 is also shameful.
So is the trunk wiring loom fraying on almost every vehicle.
And the headlight adjusters crumbling on some of the models like mine.

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Thanks for your insight.  
Very interesting!

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
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First of all, if you'd had a competent BMW mechanic, he would have replaced
it before it failed.

Secondly, when it DID fail, he would have looked at that and at the hose
underneath it as the first things that cause leaks into the throttle body.

Thirdly, if he didn't know any of these things, it should have taken him
less than five minutes to find the leak with a can of starting fluid.  There
is ABSOLUTELY NO EXCUSE for someone to bring out the smoke machine for that
sort of leak unless they are trying really hard to find ways to bill their
customers for something.

This is an EXACT example of what I am talking about when I say that doing
maintenance is cheaper than doing repairs.

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If you have it on full, the transistor is completely turned on and so there
is less heat being generated in that configuration.  However, if you have to
worry about what position of the heater puts less stress on it, something
is wrong.  Put a retrofit one in there and it won't fail.

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ABS I don't know about... but everybody knows about the loom so everybody
wraps it.  If yours wasn't wrapped, it will fail.

Likewise the headlight assemblies can be replaced with European spec ones
in some cases, which don't fail.   It's only the wacky DOT ones for the
American market that are an issue.

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I just rolled over 360,000 miles on the new car this afternoon.  Should have
it at 400,000 before 2018 starts.
--scott

--  
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Scott Dorsey actually said:

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This is dead wrong.
Everyone knows that hack.
It doesn't work for the E39.
It might have worked for 1970's era cars, but not the E39.
There just isn't any change in the engine speed no matter where or how or
what you spray on the underside of the plenum.
The leak is just too slight and the difference in engine speed too slight
and the chance of getting the fuel from the plenum to the plugs too slight.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
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If you're just spraying and not poking and prodding that's likely true, and
a lot of less severe hose cracks won't get found that way unless you are
pulling and stretching on the hose as you're hitting it.

But the plenum is easy, you just squeeze the body and shake it back and
forth.  Of course, likely you won't even need the spray because it'll
come apart in your hands.

You are definitely right that the E39 is a lot more of a pain to find leaks
in than the E30 and earlier vintage cars and more sensitive to smaller leaks.
Sometimes the smoke machine IS needed.  But sometimes you should be able to
look at the plenum and see cracks and just replace the damn thing whether or
not it's leaking, because you know it's going to start leaking soon.
--scott

--  
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
John Harmon posted for all of us...


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Doesn't seem like it from your postings.
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You sir, are the troll, asking the same questions repeatidly without  
learning.
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Overhauls?  
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German 'engineering'?

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No you don't you know it all.

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That's good then take it to email, I hope Scott has time to deal with you.

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Scott it sounds like you know vs the troll.
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So now you are using the tailpipe for coitus?

--  
Tekkie

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
Scott Dorsey actually said:

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Hi Scott,

In the case of the brake fluid, most of us use the ATE super racing blue
stuff (even though blue is not an official DOT color) and then the "amber"
ATE DOT4 where we alternate from non-DOT blue to DOT-amber.

However, this is normal maintenance for any car, since brake fluid is
hygroscopic,  

The bimmer has 6 brake hoses though, two of which fray because they're too
close to the exhaust manifold on the I6 (just behind the ABS control
module, which is also too close to the exhaust manifold, even with the heat
sheild that BMW added), so *they* have to be periodically replaced.  

Again, I do appreciate that you are one of the very (very) few people on
this newsgroup who know what you're talking about.

Many of the others (e.g., nospam, Tekkie, Jeorg, etc.) are clueless fools
who wouldn't know a bimmer from a beemer if it hit them.  

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
On Sun, 11 Dec 2016 00:08:52 -0000 (UTC), John Harmon

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I've never changed brake fluid in 50 years of car/truck ownership.
So it's not "normal" to me.

Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home
On 12/10/2016 6:57 PM, Vic Smith wrote:
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None of my cars have dual-diagonal lines so I purge the  
brake fluid annually on each of them. A burst rusted brake  
line can be a memorable experience- it sure was for me. OTOH  
I wouldn't tell anyone else how to maintain their vehicles,  
YMMV.

--  
Andrew Muzi
  <www.yellowjersey.org/>
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Re: Advice requested from those of you who have successfully checked camber at home

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I've had 3 brake line failures.  All rear wheel and all on cars that
had +20 years driving in salt.  Had one a few months ago.
They've all been on my "emergency" cars.
I was very close to home every time, and I always have a working
e-brake.
In every instance the lines were heavily corroded salt corroded.
The only maintenance I could have done to prevent it was to replace
the lines, which I should have done.  
    

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