Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?

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Any infos if Atmel licensed the AVR CPU to other chip manufacturers? I'm
bothering with their current chips available (Only large pin-count etc.).
Cheers -
Henry




Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?


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20 pins is too large?
rw


Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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I thought they had 8 pin versions, no?

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Rick "rickman" Collins

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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More to the point... 8 pins is too large? (ATtiny)

:)

Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
writes
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No... and it is not likely to happen IMHO. The world has gone ARM mad
and for those who don't need ARM there is the multi source 8051.... It
is unlikely that the AVR will go anywhere else.

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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Atmel has licensed the AVR to other companies, but they are using it for
internal purposes only.

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Best Regards
Ulf at atmel dot com
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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
Sorry. For the low pin-count I mixed my ARM ideas late-nite :) You're right
with 8 pins.
I know the AVR core is just 400 gates. So it should be possible to prog a
FPGA for it...
- Henry

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
Sorry. Read 4000 gates!

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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right
a

Look at: http://WWW.opencores.org

There is a link to an AVR-core.

More precisely: http://www.opencores.org/projects/avr_core /

Regards, Willem Ouwerkerk.





Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
I know opencores website. Unfortunately the project description is mostly
empty? Or where is it? Speed? Lowest pin-count?
- Henry

w. ouwerkerk schrieb in Nachricht ...
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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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Pin-count has nothing todo with the core.
I think you need nothing more than Vcc, GND and Clock to
run the core.


Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
FPGA and CPLD have many pins...
- Henry

Erik Hermann schrieb in Nachricht ...
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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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prog

Fun for the homebrewers, but violates some patents according to the AVR
design centre ...
(Do not know which particular patents though)

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Best Regards
Ulf at atmel dot com
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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?

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   Are you saying that Atmel have a patent on any device that executes
the AVR instruction set, or some similar Intellectual Property
protection on AVR?
   I recall Zilog making the Z80 (a quarter century ago! I'm getting
old), which executes the Intel 8080 instruction set (as well as newer,
'enhanced' instructions). As I remember the story, Intel had copyright
on their 8080 mnemonics, so Zilog used different mnemonics for the
same instructions.
   I don't recall that Intel took any legal action against a
competitor making an 8080-compatible processor, but I expect that more
recently manufacturers would consider their instruction sets and
processor operations to be their own intellectual property, and
protect them accordingly.
   This is an interesting and important question in general: Does
anyone know of the legal status of various processor designs? I recall
hearing of the 68000 and similar processors being implemented in
FPGA's - would it infringe on some Motorola intellectual property to
sell a product using such FPGA's?

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
:>
:> >Fun for the homebrewers, but violates some patents according to the AVR
:> >design centre ...
:> >(Do not know which particular patents though)
:>
:>    Are you saying that Atmel have a patent on any device that executes
:> the AVR instruction set, or some similar Intellectual Property
:> protection on AVR?

They probabely have. In the US at least...

:>    I recall Zilog making the Z80 (a quarter century ago! I'm getting
:> old), which executes the Intel 8080 instruction set (as well as newer,
:> 'enhanced' instructions). As I remember the story, Intel had copyright
:> on their 8080 mnemonics, so Zilog used different mnemonics for the
:> same instructions.

Biiig difference. A quarter of a century ago copyright coverage
was still bounded and there was this provisions for 'fair use.'
Interestingly, this opened up the market for both large and - more
importantely - small competitors. This will not do, and hence the
large multinational cooperations have successfully managed to 'tune'
copyright laws into a strangulation of competition. It is always the
same people[politicans] that talks the warmest of free market forces
that are the first to limit them in favor of the establishment.

:>    I don't recall that Intel took any legal action against a
:> competitor making an 8080-compatible processor, but I expect that more
:> recently manufacturers would consider their instruction sets and
:> processor operations to be their own intellectual property, and
:> protect them accordingly.

They did not. What they OTOH did was to lobby the senate into
placing high import duties as a 'counter dumping measure' agains
japaneese industry. This proved highly successful. Without it,
there would be no Intel or Motorola today. Remember the NEC V20?
 
: It's std 'turf protection', but first they have to know you are
: using 'their IP' in your soft core, plus they also have to be worried
: enough to harness the lawyers.

This will not do in Europe (yet.) In the US, the POT will gladly
issue patents on plain instruction sets. Even local buses - remeber
when we still had interchangeable socket-7 motherboards? This is
recent history. And it is growing worse, fast...
 
: Patents have a finite life, region of 18-20 yrs.
: So the 80C51 is now 'fully open', which is one reason it is a popular
: soft-core.

To qoute a reference I can no longer recall the origin of, but anyway:
"Every time Mickey Mouse is in peril, copyright protection is extended."

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
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 If you are asking if the AVR merchant uC family have a second source,
then no.
If you want second source (supply security), then choose the 80C51
family.

 If you are asking if the AVR is avail as an ASIC core, then Yes -
most of the AVR business is ASIC type in nature ( ROM/Vertical market
etc),
and the AVR was invented as an ASIC core.
 If that core was to be made in other than Atmel FABS, then
that's likely to be just a matter of $$$.

-jg

Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
thanks Jim

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?

I would love to find another way of implementing an AVR ATMega32
running at 16 MHz.
We have been seeing many errors at 16 MHz and especially burned in and
heated up parts.   CRC errors of flash memory...

Where can one find more info on the FPGA as described in opencores ??
thanks,
boB






On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 12:23:52 +1300, Jim Granville

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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
Why not use the FPSLIC? Runs at 25MHz.
- Henry

boB schrieb in Nachricht ...
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etc.).
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Re: Does Atmel licensed AVR to others?
How about price?  That thing lists at $50, IIRC.  I was also advised by
an Altera FAE that not many are using it and it would be a bad thing to
put in a new product.  It may go away any time.  


Henry wrote:
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Rick "rickman" Collins

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