What technology will be next


Anyone have an idea what will come after LCD & Plasma
have had their run in the market for TV and monitors?
Reply to
I Caught Kate
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OLED, once the technology is improved.
Cheers, Nicholas Sherlock
Reply to
Nicholas Sherlock
crystal balls
Reply to
Mark
Speaking of crytal balls, for IEEE members out there, has anyone seen the picture of a swept 3D display in the IEEE Spectrum Magazine? Its like a glass globe and an image forms inside.
3D technology looks really cool.
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Wing Wong.
Webpage: http://wing.ucc.asn.au
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Reply to
W W
They will just get bigger/smaller and in the case of Plasma, cheaper.
D.
Reply to
David Hardie
Paper books.
Well, you can always hope.
Luke
Reply to
Luke Webber
FED.
Reply to
Fish! - of Arcadia.
Speaking of which I was in the Kodak site and the way they are going on about OLED panels it's a wonder they haven't replaced LCD panels in most products already.
One of their claims is that they are faster then film when it comes to speed.
Also faster then video pixel response
See here
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and
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John

Remember the good old 1980s
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Reply to
Kate Fights, I Cry
Agreed, OLED will definitely revolutionise screen technology. Do you know if they have the color OLEDs working yet?
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The Raven
http://www.80scartoons.co.uk/batfinkquote.mp3
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Reply to
The Raven
See here
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and
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Reply to
Kate Fights, I Cry
Have heard of DLP ("Digital Light Processing") is a proprietary technology developed by Texas Instruments. It works quite differently than LCD. Instead of having glass panels through which light is passed, the DLP chip is a reflective surface made up of thousands of tiny mirrors. Each mirror represents a single pixel.
search google for dlp_demo.swf and watch it.
Anyone have an idea what will come after LCD & Plasma have had their run in the market for TV and monitors?
Reply to
Eric
I can't for the life of me work out why a set of three lasers (RGB) shouldn't be bounced off two spinning polygonal mirrors and modulated to produce a projector. Lasers are fairly inefficient light sources though, perhaps that's the reason. Plenty of advantages if it could be made to work, though.
Clifford Heath.
Reply to
Clifford Heath
What are you hinting at? Would the lasers make a hologram?
Reply to
Kate Fights, I Cry
Not necessarily. I was thinking that I could have a tablet or handheld PC, and it could project the screen image onto a suitable wall or even the back of the seat in front, giving a decent sized screen image out of a small device. Basically a portable computer with built-in projector.
Reply to
Clifford Heath
You'd have to move the mirrors pretty damn fast for that to happen. Have you ever been to a laser show? They can't even show a line drawing (with far less area to cover than a screen!) with any stability (Can't do it fast enough).
Cheers, Nicholas Sherlock
Reply to
Nicholas Sherlock
Laser light shows use positional transducers. This would use a spinning polygonal mirror. The horizontal sweep would need for example a 12-sided mirror spinning at 78000 RPM to achieve the 15625 kHz refresh rate of TV - quite doable. Relatively un-exotic devices exist that use air bearings to spin 20 times as fast - modern dental drills for example that spin over 1M RPM.
Reply to
Clifford Heath
I remember a few months ago, either Sony or some other Japanese company put on market a PDA type device with a small OLED screen, instead of an LCD screen. It was on the news as a world first for a commercially available device that used OLED technology.
Reply to
khangu
Go wild:
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Chris,
Reply to
Chris McDonald
Check out EDN's Brian Dilbert missive at
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Reply to
dmm

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