Phone battery question.

After 15 or so years the nicad battery in our 30y.o. portable phone has chucked it in (it's only ever had one replacement). The current options are nicad or Ni-MH.

Which way should I go?

If Ni-MH how long is it likely to last?

I only get around 4 years between replacements with a Samsung mobile which presumably has a smart charger, hence the question.

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John H
Reply to
John_H
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Can you use a Ni-MH battery in it? Will the in-built charging system suffice for a Ni-MH battery? I generally replace like for like in those circumstances and use NiCad to replace NiCad. That said, I had a triple set of those phones and it was cheaper to buy a new set of *phones* than bother with a set of 3 batteries. Yes, they were all on the way out.

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Xeno 


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing. 
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Reply to
Xeno

John_H wrote

Ni-MH.

About the same time again.

But that is a Li ion battery so quite different.

Reply to
Rod Speed

**If the 'phone was designed to use NiCad batteries, then that is what you should use. NiCad and NiMh batteries have different charging requirements.
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Reply to
Trevor Wilson

It predates Ni-MH but both are cuurently available as replacements. It's the differences in the charging systems that concern but I'm unsure as to whether it really matters.

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John H
Reply to
John_H

Oops, my mistake.

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John H
Reply to
John_H

Both types are available to fit it. Both have the same plug.

Dunno, that's why I'm asking. Both are the same voltage but presumbly later phones have smart chargers... or so I've been told.

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John H
Reply to
John_H

If it predates NiMH, then it's unlikely to be designed to charge them properly.

Stick with what's known to work.

Sylvia.

Reply to
Sylvia Else

**It can matter. Use NiCads.
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Reply to
Trevor Wilson

** Shame how they are banned from retail sale over most of the world. Cadmium is toxic and persistent in the environment.

Even CdS photo cells are banned in the EU etc.

...... Phil

Reply to
Phil Allison

Phil Allison wrote

Bullshit they are and they clearly aren't banned here and that's what matters.

Irrelevant to what John should use.

Reply to
Rod Speed

**WES stock some of the best NiCads available (Sanyo). CDS cells are also available from a number of sources in Australia. The EU does some weird shit, like insisting on insane protection systems on relatively low powered amplifier speaker terminals. For large amps, it makes some sense, though I am unaware of anyone who has been killed by contacting speaker terminations. I suppose it could happen with a 1,000 Watt @ 8 Ohm amplifier and a person with a weak heart and/or a secure connection to both terminals across the heart. Oh, and with the amplifier being driven by low frequency sine waves. Music is unlikely to cut it.
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Reply to
Trevor Wilson

Yes, that was my thought on the topic. Use the same as it had, can't go wrong.

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Xeno 


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Reply to
Xeno

Rod Speed Fuckwit Idiot wrote: ==========================

** But we do not make them here and few companies make them at all now. New products do NOT use them, they are 100% OBSOLETE !!!
** Massively relevant to finding any.

...... Phil

Reply to
Phil Allison

Phil Allison wrote

Irrelevant. The phone it is going into isn't made here either.

Irrelevant. Clearly someone still does.

So is the phone. If John wants to keep using that phone, a NiCad battery is the only sensible thing to use.

He doesn't want one.

Reply to
Rod Speed

I failed to mention that the nicad is twice the price but there's also a possibility they'll no longer be available further down the track. Nor do I want the hassle of replacing the phone as the cradle is screwed to the wall.

Consequently I've decided to stick with nicad and hope it lasts another 15 years..

Thanks to all who replied.

--
John H
Reply to
John_H

John_H wrote

Thanks for the washup, too rare imo.

Reply to
Rod Speed

John_H wrote: ============

** You never mentioned what size: AA, AAA or button cell pack ?
** Very few made any more.
** Poor diddums.

** Wot an pie eyed optimist.

Any NiCds you buy today are likely to be old stock - up to 10 years old.

..... Phil

Reply to
Phil Allison

Does that matter? My experience with rechargables (though I'm not sure about NiCds in particular) has been that old but never-used batteries have good performance similar to new.

SLAs may be an exception, my leaving those on a shelf doing nothing for a few months has often turned out to be a death sentence. Very annoying given how pricy they are.

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Reply to
Computer Nerd Kev

Phil Allison wrote

He did say connector and since its an ancient cordless phone, it isnt likely to be any of those.

Nope, thats what the previous batterys delivered.

Reply to
Rod Speed

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