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Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?


On Mon, 06 Mar 2006 05:45:00 GMT, "Tom Smyth"

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What can a hobbyist build that China can't supply ready made for half
the price? Not much, I'd say.

As for careers in electronics, I think ultimately all design will be
done offshore. So what will there be left for "professionals" to do,
except to emigrate?

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?



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Retire.

Tom

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?


keyboard and composed:

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I suppose they could write the specs.

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?


There would be well over $300M worth of electronic equipment designed here in
Australia - the market for professional engineers is still healthy.  It is true
that
more product is being built offshore to allow competitiveness in world markets,
but
Aussies are still highly valued as business partners, designers and innovators.

As for careers in electronics, designers don't just spit out finished products,
there
are quality engineers, project managers, component manufacturers, accountants,
financiers, mechanical engineers, manufacturing engineers, technicians,
assemblers,
purchasers, distributors and wholesalers etc.  that all contribute to a
products'
success.

-Andrew M

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Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?




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Heaps of things, especially if they are (i) one-offs and will never be
profitable as a comsumer item, and (ii) meet a small specialised LOCAL need,
especially for business or industry.

A recent example is an LED signal for train signal teaching purpose.  The
instructor liked the prototype so much that he bought a bigger version.  And
his colleague wants another version, but slightly different.

Sure this $50 signal would retail for $9.99 if mass-produced, but since
there isn't a mass market, the Chinese (or anyone else) aren't going to make
it happen.

There must be other similar unmet needs that aren't widespread enough for
mass production, yet are desired enough that people are willing to pay more
than consumer prices for them.

Peter



Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?


keyboard and composed:

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I think you've hit the nail on the head. As far as electronics is
concerned, Australia will be left with specialty boutiques while China
and India will get the department stores. Even so, you may still be
surprised as to what constitutes a viable production quantity.

For example, a friend designs and manufactures a best selling prawning
lamp for the Australian market. The design and testing is nowhere near
as trivial as it may first appear. Many competitors have attempted and
failed to produce a reliable alternative. Because the market is
relatively small, one would have thought that he would have been safe
from serious competition. However, the Chinese have recently attempted
to copy his design, so low production volumes do not appear to be a
deterrent for them.

- Franc Zabkar
--
Please remove one 'i' from my address when replying by email.

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?



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In exchanges with (the late) Peter Crowcroft, he explained that the chinese will
copy anything with even miniscule volume.  Their rationale - if you could call
it that - is that there IS volume if you get the price down.  You and I know
that the gizmo is a one-off or will never sell more than a dozen.  They believe
otherwise.  He was getting some pcb's made for me by one of his mainland fabs,
and strongly recommended I remove all information from the board that might give
a clue as to its end use.

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?


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I think this is where you and others are wrong. The "chinese" must have
at least a million shops that they can flog their stuff to. This is why
you were told to remove identification marks. Many of these shops will
stock a box and see how it sell. That initial stock is still a good
production run.

Am I the only person to cruise these $2 shops to see what trinkets are
around?

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?



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When I say that I know the gizmo will only ever sell a dozen, I DO happen to
know my product and the market.  Any chinese fab who wants to make a hundred,
thousand, or million is welcome as long as I've already sold that dozen.  The
laugh will be on him.

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Probably not, but my product doesn't fall into trinket category.  It is a VERY
narrow niche market (remember, "a dozen"?) and even with the most comprehensive
product description/illustration on the packaging they aren't going to sell any.
I'd love to see them try.

Now if it was the next_big_thing (especially in toyland) I'd remove every mark
and clue from the artwork.  But it isn't.  The key here is knowing the market
before you venture into pcb fab.

Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?



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No but it depends what the market wants. Electronics enthusiasts like the
build things themselves because that's how we learn the skills that can in
some cases be put to good use in other pursuits.

And then there is the feeling you get from building something yourself that
works better and more reliably than what you might be able to get from Ching
Chong country.

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I don't believe that will happen  because then you would not be able to get
things designed properly to suit the local market, the local consumer
environment, or to suit the conditions that exist in other aspects of our
society.

China has the advantage (for now) of dirt-cheap labour and a huge
population. But what will be the effect of that? With such as massive
population, wage and inflation pressure will become extreme and over time
(say 10 to 20 years), getting things made in China will become increasingly
expensive and eventually so expensive that local design and production will
be attractive and affordable again.

Craig.
--
 SUN RIPENED KERNELS - Surplus Sun Microsystems Equipment, Parts + Accessories
    Waterfall, NSW, Australia - Operated by Craig Dewick - Founded in 1996
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Re: Jaycar - Business opportunity?



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increasingly
will

No, some other country takes over. There are plenty of African countries
that could supply cheap labour.
After all, China only took over from Japan, Korea etc. as costs there became
more expensive.

MrT.



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