Grundig Satellit 300 whinge - Page 3

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Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
On Dec 11, 3:54A0%pm, Jamie
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You are a lunatic. The project was an in-house development for the
Nijmegen University Science Faculty, and all the money that was spent
was spent on paying peoples salaries - we did buy a couple of mixed-
signal connectors and inserts, but only so the guy looking after the
technicians could see what I had in mind, and show it to the
technicians - which was peanuts.

The people would have been paid the same whatever they were working
on.

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Perhaps, but this was a university project and a very long way from
big business. I did work for ITT for a while - back when it was the
epitome of big business - and there wasn't any significant extra cash
flowing into any of our pockets, or the people directly above us. This
was in the U.K. ITT in the US did waste a lot of money at the time,
but most of it seems to have gone into management follies - there was
a pulp and paper mill in Canada which soaked up a billion or so, but
purely because the trees that it was supposed to turn into pulp and
then paper couldn't actually be cut down cheaply enough to make the
project work.

--
Bill Sloman, Nijmegen


Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
On Dec 11, 3:52A0%am, John Larkin
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Stuff that you claim is new and pushing the envelope, mainly because
you don't know all that much.

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In the same way that you know the scientific evidence for
anthropogenic global warming isn't to be relied on, and want us to
ignore the risk that the global climate could get to be 2C warmer by
the end of the century.

You are ignorant and over-confident, which doesn't damage your
business as much as it might because you don't know about the bleeding
edge stuff that is being written up in the academic literature, and
think that it is cutting edge when it percolates down to off-the-shelf
products that you can buy from Digikey. Not buying stuff that you
can't buy from Digikey (or Farnell) is actually a pretty good
strategy, but it does preclude you from claiming to push the envelope.

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Actually, the logic prompted Cambridge Instruments to can the project
was not that it wouldn't sell, but that they couldn't rely on selling
enough machines within the following eighteen months to give them the
cash flow that they needed to cover the costs of getting the machine
into production.

The situation was complicated by the fact that the pointy-headed boss
who had insisted on the 10psec quantisation in the first place had
been demoted from technical director to manager of the electron-beam
tester project about half-way through the life of the project, much to
his disgust, and he'd proceeded to betray the team by spending his
last six months in the job setting up a new company (which still
existed a few years ago) based on two of the companies better senior
engineers (neither from our team), while failing to sell the  electron
beam tester.

When he actually resigned, the marketing department - who had hated
his guts for years, not without reason, since he was a dishonest (if
very intelligent) bastard - had had to go through his list of sales
prospects and figure out who was actually likely to buy a machine.

They figured out that they could sell twelve in eighteen months, which
wasn't quite enough. There were probably more prospects than had been
listed - the pointy-headed boss hadn't been trying all that hard - but
the marketing department were in a particularly sceptical mood at the
time/

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There was a management failure by the man who ran the science faculty
workshop, who had let the project chew up a couple of person-years of
work for the benenfit of a potential customer who turned out not to be
in a position to use it, but the technology didn't get to a point
where it could be said to have failed. I had essentially no contact
with the guy who had commissioned the project - he had a long
established relationship with the guy who had developed the amazing -
if excessively handcrafted - TTL-based pulse generator that he was
using at the time, and since I got on fine with our guy I was happy to
let him do the talking. Obviously, I shouldn't have been, but I liked
the people involved, and went out of my way not to upset them more
than I had to. Implicitly telling my friend that he should have been
using ECL ten years earlier was not something that I enjoyed doing,
but I didn't have any choice about that.

--
Bill Sloman, Nijmegen


Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
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The old Grundig Satellites from the late 60's and 70's were much worse.
OTOH, as a kid I got to repair some and that provided a very nice boost
for the hobby budget. Those things broke all the time, especially the
really big ones that almost had the size of a briefcase. They were ok if
you left them in one spot and just turned the dial. But woe to him who
thought the handle meant they could be transported frequently.

The way it usually went was the owner didn't trust a kid like me with
that because these radios had cost them a fortune when new. So they gave
 them to a radio & TV repair shop. Those guys eventually threw their
hands up in the air, gave up. With that, the radio had reached basket
case status and I got it. It was nice to see the jaws drop when they
worked again.

Some defects were outright mean. Such as super-thin enameled wires that
corroded off inside the IF filter cans. It seems they must have used
some aggressive flux and under there it didn't get cleaned out too well.
So when I got one of those surrendered cases the first order of biz was
to ohm out all those windings.


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He is right.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
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What struck me as well is that the thing must have been a nightmare to
manufacture. Presumably all those connections were soldered by hand, and
somehow they have to address the problem I had - how to close the case
without breaking one of them.

I wonder what proportion of the completed units had to be rejected
because they didn't work properly.

Sylvia.

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge

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It looks like they spent most of their effort making it look good on the =

outside. I have some old German meters my father got from a =
Messerschmitt20%
factory in Germany during WW2, and the wiring was very neat. But of =
course20%
it was simpler than a SW radio. Still, I would expect much better =
attention20%
to detail in a German product.

I recently bought a DSP shortwave radio on eBay for $15 plus $10 =
shipping.20%
It was made in China and all the labels and instructions were in =
Chinese. By20%
the time I contacted them and got a translation, I had figured out most =
of20%
it. I have not used it much, but it seems pretty nice:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/190452362072?ssPageName3D%STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid3D %
p3984.m1497.l2649

Paul20%


Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
On Mon, 05 Dec 2011 07:24:14 -0800, John Larkin

<SNIP>
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Consumer-grade connectors in the 80's had their own issues, never mind
the cost. Looks like the display used a printed edge connector - that
would have been considered quite progressive for the time.

I've an Emerso/Sangean/Olympia ATSxxxx clone from the ~ same era.
First thing to go was normally the 'digital pot' tuning dial stuck out
the side. It has electromechanical wipers that can misalign on
impact.....

I've resoldered an internal solid-conductor shielded cable termination
three times (first time after buying it as 'dead' scrap). You don't
see any solid conductors inside the Satellite. Count your blessings.

Mine's still in daily use, in spite of having a melted front face,
aquired when positioned on a test shelf, in too close proximity (12
inches) to a multi-KW passive load, sometime in the early 90s. It was
a first order EMC policeman, and a useful indicator of the functioning
status in the nearby switch-mode DUTs.

RL

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
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Which is why the Japanese in that era rose to the top in the
electronics market.


In  modern times, the Chinese are now slowly but surely working their
way there.

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
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Hey, Guys -

She said it's about 30 years old. What were you doing back then?
Searching for connectors or getting the product out?

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge

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Desigining and building one of a kind test equipment.

?-)

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
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That would be 1981 when I was working for ITT-Creed in Brighton, on
the communicating word-processor that was going to replace the TWX/
Telex machine (and eventually did - for a few years - in Germany and
Sweden). I was spending most of my time reviewing software and
communications protocols. We did point out to marketing the hardware
would actually make a handy office computer - it was pretty much
exactly equivalent to the IBM PC, but with an 8086 rather than a 8088
- but marketing didn't think that they could sell more than 150 a year
in the UK into that market.

--
Bill Sloman, Nijmegen

Re: Grundig Satellit 300 whinge
On Mon, 05 Dec 2011 20:12:05 +1100, Sylvia Else

test (after failure to show)

my apologies if this passes.
still hunting server issues.

RL

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