SPI Interface

ITYWF that its instruction set was heavily influenced by the need to make a CPU that worked fast on the minimum of silicon.
--
Everything you read in newspapers is absolutely true, except for the  
rare story of which you happen to have first-hand knowledge. ? Erwin Knoll
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
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..like the 6502, which also pipelined the fetch and execute phases.
Typical instruction time was about 3 cycles--very fast for the time. IIRC it was about 12,000 transistors, and used a PLA for control.
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-michael - NadaNet 3.1 and AppleCrate II: http://home.comcast.net/~mjmahon
Reply to
Michael J. Mahon
Well, that's memory for you. ;-)
The 6502 was 3,510 transistors!
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-michael - NadaNet 3.1 and AppleCrate II: http://home.comcast.net/~mjmahon
Reply to
Michael J. Mahon
12,000 transistors was half way to an ARM1.
The ARM2 also had 25,000, but it shot up to 300,000 on the ARM3 due to the 4K of cache.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Good thing they were making transistors smaller by then. I'd hate to have to wire that up on solderless breadboards... I'm just sayin'
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
How about relays !!!
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;-)
Reply to
hamilton
Too high tech. Try this!
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W J G
Reply to
Folderol
That's one of my favourite websites.
Reply to
Rob Morley
This gives new meaning to :
1 + 1 = 10 for large volume of 1
Reply to
hamilton
Eh?
Reply to
Rob Morley
I also like this device:
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Reply to
Rob
there are 10 types of people in the world, those who understand binary those who dont
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 conning the most intellegent people on the planet is not easy
Reply to
alister
That's rather excellent.
Reply to
Rob Morley
Indeed :)
Perhaps we could use something to drive the blue LEDs. Hmmm, maybe a Raspberry Pi could do it :P
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W J G
Reply to
Folderol
I'm familiar with that one, just not the other.
Why is o6 afraid of o7? Because o7 o10 o11.
Reply to
Rob Morley
Ooh, you're so ... on topic.
Reply to
Rob Morley
pi = 22/7 for large values of pi
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-michael - NadaNet 3.1 and AppleCrate II: http://home.comcast.net/~mjmahon
Reply to
Michael J. Mahon
MJM has got it.
The marble is larger then a bit. i.e. larger volume
Reply to
hamilton
There, fixed your post for you! :-)
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J B Good
Reply to
Johny B Good
This, at least, includes the hint of the number base with a letter 'o' prefix. The 'joke' only becomes apparent when you convert to decimal notation:
"Why is 6 afraid of 7?" "Because 7 8 9."
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J B Good
Reply to
Johny B Good

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