So, what's the story?

I built my ZX80 and also ZX81 kits for others...
The ZX80 was £99 ready built or £79 for the kit - but the kit excluded the PSU brick, which Sinclair flogged for £11 IIRC.
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John. 
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John Rumm
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There is an interesting story there - basically the TI chip used was not ever intended to work in a scientific calculator - it just did the basic arithmetic operations. Clever programming etc made it jump though hoops:
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John. 
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John Rumm
On Sat, 21 Sep 2013 22:33:05 +0300, Tauno Voipio wrote >> >>> (sin 7 degrees)^2 + (cos 7 degrees)^2 produced, ...
Ah, yes, I thought there was a way to duplicate x but I couldn't remember it.
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Ivan Reid, School of Engineering & Design, _____________  CMS Collaboration, 
Brunel University.    Ivan.Reid@[brunel.ac.uk|cern.ch]    Room 40-1-B12, CERN 
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Ivan D. Reid
The first is nearer. Retired US Military, explains the arrogance and inabilty to listen.
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Cheers 
Dave.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
I gather that you bought the various pieces from different suppliers, so it could be that the quality was quite variable. That's not necessarily a reflection on the PI.
My own very limited experience is that there are issues with different 32GB micro SDHC cards when used in a Pi with an SD to SDHC adaptor, and that more recent software images may work when older ones don't.
One card works, some can't even be reliably *written* when plugged into my laptop via a USB adaptor, some appear to write successfully but won't boot, but so far plain old SD cards (which is what the Pi was originally designed for) seem to work consistently, for me at least.
Something seems to have fooled you, but so far it isn't clear what that might be.
Are Beaglebones supposed to be easier to use, or more reliable?
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Windmill, TiltNot@NoneHome.com       Use  t m i l l 
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Windmill
How does this Beaglebone thing compare with the Pi? Are TI providing loads of support for it (I doubt ;-).
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Windmill, TiltNot@NoneHome.com       Use  t m i l l 
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Windmill
No! you're not worth it.
(I refer to your spelling, not your attitude).
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nev 
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nev young
[ snippage ]
The Register compared the two:
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// Christian
Reply to
Christian Brunschen
On Sat, 21 Sep 2013 16:28:34 +0100, Alan Adams declaimed the following:
Well, some improvement... My HP50 (RPL running on SATURN emulated by underclocked ARM) gives 0.999999999999
Well, actually, it gives SQ(SIN(7))+SQ(COS(7)) until I hit the ->Num function
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
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Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
On Sat, 21 Sep 2013 17:48:52 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice" declaimed the following:
7 sin x^2 7 cos x^2 +
(where x^2 is a single function, and presuming the calculator is configured for degree notation)
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	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
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Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
If the 7 had instead been some arbitrarily long value like 7.19347544, would you need to type it in twice?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
lack/
When a guy says right at the start he likes stirring things up it rather discredits anything else he says, don't you think?
That's why I didn't comment on the article - I didn't want to feed his ego.
However, he's rather comparing chalk with cheese. The two platforms are not aimed at the same target as far as I can see. Apart from anything else, beyond about 8, the number of digital I/O pins is relatively unimportant. From an education point of view (which is where the Pi is focused) ease of control is more relevant.
Also I get the impression that with the BBB you're more-or-less limited to one Linux distro. The Pi has an expanding set of OSs that will run on it.
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W J G
Reply to
Folderol
There doesn't seem to be much difference. My views:
Upsides: - Onboard 2GB flash. My RPi corrupted its SD card twice after running a few weeks. Power or incompatible card, I dunno. Haven't used it in a while. - Works headless out of the box with a single cable. Seems like a cool thing. - More I/O pins exposed. - Android support.
Downsides: - No video acceleration so not usable as a media player like the RPi. Not that RPi makes a great media player but I felt it was OK with raspbmc. - Just one USB vs. two in the RPi. - Tight placement of the mini-HDMI connector close to the USB.
Reply to
Anssi Saari
No, you could do something like:
7.19347544 ENTER ENTER ----> pushes a copy of the 7.19347544 onto the stack SIN 2 Y^X SWAP ----> interchanges SIN^2 and the copy COS 2 Y^X +
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roger ivie 
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Reply to
Roger Ivie
His ego is unimportant. The review discusses the facts of the two boards and that is what is important an useful.
Why does the "target" matter? Each of these boards will be used in a variety of applications because of their suitability. There is no reason why the two shouldn't be compared even if it just shows that one is better suited for one task and the other for another task. That's actually the purpose of such a comparison, to clearly indicate what is better about which board.
Why not do your own review?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
You responded for Dennis. He isn't using an RPN machine.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
I was actually referring to the ones talking about old farts.
There is neither a useful purpose to denigrating the OP or to making unfounded assumptions about him. Your response does speak about your prejudices however.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
TI provides *no* support for the BB just as Broadcom provides *no* support for the rPi. Neither of these products were produced by the chip makers.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
Very good summary of the article. Or do you have enough familiarity with the two that you figured this out yourself?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
He said "My HP50 (RPL running on SATURN emulated by underclocked ARM)". What do you suppose the "RP" in "RPL" stands for?
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roger ivie 
rivie@ridgenet.net
Reply to
Roger Ivie

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