Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

Reply to
Commander Kinsey
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"Can I get engineering sample processors from Intel?

Due to the pre-production nature of the engineering sample processors, they are generally only loaned to OEMs, ODMs, and ISVs for pre-production test and evaluation work under specific contractual terms and conditions to assure the protection of assets and confidential information.

Engineering sample processors are not made available to the general public by Intel."

In effect, you're in possession of stolen goods.

The whole idea is, no matter what happens, those goods are not to be circulating in the hands of the public. You could give them back to the local rep, and he could have them shredded. (Some factories shred their e-waste to prevent recovery by waste removal people.)

Those samples could have defects, maybe they don't have a 100,000 hour operating life (early mortality). They might not even compute properly at full speed. Like an ES 3GHz processor, there might be an errata sheet in the box, stating you're supposed to run them at 2GHz.

Intel could also mark them with sufficient information, to trace them back to who received them. To determine who is leaking them and violating a contract term.

With other manufacturers, those parts are the equivalent of the "qual barrel". And the stuff in the qual barrel, is definitely not production quality.

Not allowing them to be sold, is to protect *you* from receiving inferior goods.

Paul

Reply to
Paul

They're not stolen, since Intel don't take them back from who they "lent" them to.

They clearly say sample on them. If I bought one knowing it's a sample, why would I have a problem?

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

Someone could rent a car, and then sell it to you. The sale was illegal by the seller, but YOU are in possesion of stolen property.

WHO sold you the engineering sample?

Reply to
VanguardLH

Readded, why is this not to do with legalities?

A CPU is electronic you utter nitwit.

They should have thought of that when they sold absolute shite. I'll put whatever I want in there. If anyone chooses to email it, they're the ones breaking the law.

Intel don't ask for it back like the car rental place does. It's given not loaned.

Why would I grass off someone who supplied me with a nice cheap CPU?

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

Actually it isn't. Were you thinking of spam.com? Please pay attention at the back.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

You've stated those two things in another post, stop repeating yourself.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

The only idiot here is the one who thinks that nospam.com isn't registered. It is and you don't own the domain.

Do you know how to check?

Reply to
Fredxx

The only nitwit here is one who thinks that no one who posts in the suggested group has a grasp of the legal aspects of samples.

Reply to
Fredxx

Try going to it. It's for sale, just like iurvesiugbstgb.com. You can buy either if you want.

And I'm not "using" the domain by stating it here. Anyone who spams it however, is.

Let me make this simple for your simple mind: I spot a car that's left unlocked. I point it out to you. You steal the car. Who's the theif?

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

You've got your negatives mixed up there. I think that some of them do, which is why I posted to that group.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

You are complicit where you are aiding and abetting the theft through Joint Enterprise.

Reply to
Fredxx

Stop being such a pedantic fuckwit. There is no judge on this earth who would do me for saying to you, "hey that car's not locked".

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

Paul wrote: =========

** True story:

A manufacturer here in Sydney ( Jands Electronics) made a "pre-production" batch of a new model power amplifier for professional use. They wisely chose to road test it in the expected environment - on the road with live bands. They proved to be problematic in several respects and the design was heavily revised for the production version. The sample amps were fully labelled with the maker's logo and the same model number as the later versions. Think there were about 20 of them, put into storage for eventual disposal.

Then an enterprising staff member obtained them and decided he could sell them all to a local second hand dealer - letting him believe they were just like the regular models on sale at the time - but for a very low price so giving him a large mark up.

One soon wound up on my bench, biggest lemon I ever saw - full of design problems that no tech could fix. I rang the manufacturer and spoke with the production manager ( Ed) whom I knew. He groaned when I described the amp and it's issues saying they should never have left the factory. " If that amp came back to us - we would refuse to accept it" - he remarked.

I had to explain this to the owner and the dodgy dealer - neither of whom were inclined to believe me. Very nasty situation far any repair tech to be caught up in. Other owners who had been scammed called me and I advised them to return the amp/s to the same dealer for a refund.

Later I met up with the guy who had done the dirty deal, what an utter asshole.

...... Phil

Reply to
Phil Allison

Well that was pretty stupid of them. At least Intel stamp their CPUs with "engineering sample".

So he lied. But my question was about selling them as engineering samples.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

Commander Kinsey Raving Lunatic wrote: ====================

** Not at all - if problems were small or fixable the amps would have been used in the same company's hire business. Needed to look right for that job.
** No. He deceived a gullible fool and sold items that wound up hurting the company he worked for.
** The situations are parallel.

In both cases the items were not meant for sale for good reasons. And assholes like YOU wanted to circumvent that decision for their own benefit.

...... Phil

Reply to
Phil Allison

No need to have the same model number.

That is a lie, he did not say they were tests.

No, if I buy an engineering sample advertised as such, I don't expect it to work perfectly.

Newsgroups reinstated.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

Still applicable. That was the best retort you could come up with? And you STILL haven't answered who sold you or is selling those samples. Hmm, maybe you're the seller. Reminds of the scammers on eBay that slice up a volume license to separate individual buyers.

Reply to
VanguardLH

No point as I'll see it in the other post.

It wasn't a retort, I was pointing out you're wasting time saying the same thing multiple times.

Why would I want you to grass him off?

As for licenses, I've bought about 50 Windows 7 premium licenses, with genuine stickers for £37 when the retail was £137. They work fine.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

If it shouldn't be done, it's odd how every newsreader allows it.

I post to groups where I think people will give an answer or be interested.

Using the word netizen indicates you're a freak.

I thought you were talking about spam.com, Hormel Food Corporation, that sells that disgusting waste product as food. I didn't realise you'd be stupid enough to think nospam.com was a company.

I'm not going to put my own address in there and receive spam am I?

Spam is illegal is it not? If not why not?

I do, but see no point in using it.

It isn't anyone's, and I'm not the one sending the spam.

That's not a loan if it doesn't have to be paid back, that was a gift.

Doesn't matter to me. I've paid the money and I have the product, any theft that took place previously is not of my concern.

People do not loan sticks of gum. They give them.

I'm not, I'm whining about it being difficult for sellers to advertise them.

They stole it, not me.

Of course it isn't. When I break the speed limit and don't get caught, I receive no fine, so the law has had no effect on me.

Reply to
Commander Kinsey

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