Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
On 1/3/2022 12:21 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
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https://www.intel.ca/content/www/ca/en/support/articles/000056190/processors.html

    "Can I get engineering sample processors from Intel?

     Due to the pre-production nature of the engineering sample processors,
     they are generally only loaned to OEMs, ODMs, and ISVs for pre-production
     test and evaluation work under specific contractual terms and conditions
     to assure the protection of assets and confidential information.

     Engineering sample processors are not made available
     to the general public by Intel."

In effect, you're in possession of stolen goods.

The whole idea is, no matter what happens, those goods are
not to be circulating in the hands of the public. You could give
them back to the local rep, and he could have them shredded.
(Some factories shred their e-waste to prevent recovery by
waste removal people.)

Those samples could have defects, maybe they don't have
a 100,000 hour operating life (early mortality). They might not
even compute properly at full speed. Like an ES 3GHz processor,
there might be an errata sheet in the box, stating you're supposed
to run them at 2GHz.

Intel could also mark them with sufficient information, to
trace them back to who received them. To determine who is leaking
them and violating a contract term.

With other manufacturers, those parts are the equivalent of the
"qual barrel". And the stuff in the qual barrel, is definitely
not production quality.

Not allowing them to be sold, is to protect *you* from receiving
inferior goods.

    Paul

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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They're not stolen, since Intel don't take them back from who they "lent" them to.

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They clearly say sample on them.  If I bought one knowing it's a sample, why would I have a problem?

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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Someone could rent a car, and then sell it to you.  The sale was illegal
by the seller, but YOU are in possesion of stolen property.

WHO sold you the engineering sample?

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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You've stated those two things in another post, stop repeating yourself.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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Still applicable.  That was the best retort you could come up with?  And
you STILL haven't answered who sold you or is selling those samples.
Hmm, maybe you're the seller.  Reminds of the scammers on eBay that
slice up a volume license to separate individual buyers.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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ote:
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processors.html
ocessors,
e-production
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 conditions
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on.
"lent" them to.
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mple, why would I have a problem?
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egal
lf.

No point as I'll see it in the other post.

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It wasn't a retort, I was pointing out you're wasting time saying the sa=
me thing multiple times.

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s.

Why would I want you to grass him off?

As for licenses, I've bought about 50 Windows 7 premium licenses, with g=
enuine stickers for A3%37 when the retail was A3%137.  They work fine.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
 Paul wrote:
=========
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** True story:  

A manufacturer here in Sydney ( Jands Electronics) made a  "pre-production" batch of a new model power amplifier for professional use.  
They wisely chose to road test it in the expected environment - on the road with live bands.  
They proved to be problematic in several respects and the design was heavily revised for the production version.  
The sample amps were fully labelled with the maker's logo and the same model number as the later versions.  
Think there were about 20 of them, put into storage for eventual disposal.  

Then an enterprising staff member obtained them and decided he could sell them all to a local second hand dealer -  letting him believe they were just like the regular models on sale at the time - but for a very low price so giving him a large mark up.  

One soon wound up on my bench, biggest lemon I ever saw -  full of design problems that no tech could fix.  
I rang the manufacturer and spoke with the production manager ( Ed) whom I knew.  
He groaned when I described the amp and it's issues saying they should never have left the factory.  
" If that amp came back to us - we would refuse to accept it"  -  he remarked.  

I had to explain this to the owner and the dodgy dealer -  neither of whom were inclined to believe me.  
Very nasty situation far any repair tech to be caught up in.  
Other owners who had been scammed called me and I advised them to return the amp/s to the same dealer for a refund.  

Later I met up with the guy who had done the dirty deal,  what an utter asshole.  


......   Phil  




Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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Well that was pretty stupid of them.  At least Intel stamp their CPUs with "engineering sample".

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So he lied.  But my question was about selling them as engineering samples.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
Commander Kinsey Raving Lunatic wrote:
====================
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**  Not at all  -  if problems were small or fixable the amps would have been used in the same company's hire business.  
     Needed to look right for that job.  


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** No. He deceived a gullible fool and sold items that wound up hurting the company he worked for.

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**  The situations are parallel.  

  In both cases the items were not meant for sale for good reasons.
  And assholes like YOU wanted to circumvent that decision for their own benefit.  


......   Phil  

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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No need to have the same model number.

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That is a lie, he did not say they were tests.

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No, if I buy an engineering sample advertised as such, I don't expect it to work perfectly.

Newsgroups reinstated.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
I've only seen this one post, but I know  pre production models of things  
can slip out for whatever reason. I had a computer once where the pcb had  
been manufactured with a fault, tend you can clearly see back then where the  
tracks had been manually cut and wires bridged the contacts to the right  
places, leaving the  tracks as orphans.
 Likewise a number of Sinclair ZX Spectrums in the early days were made with  
known faulty ULA chips and a logic chip  glued to the surface with its legs  
splayed and wired to make the circuit work.
 The first batch of Phillips CD100s the very first CD player on the market  
had quite a lot of wires cut tracks and components wired in odd ways inside  
it. I have to say that none of these what we might call bodges ever caused  
any trouble during the lives of the  products. The CD100 is in fact still  
working, although its  tendency to jump if a gnat walks across the floor  
shows it does not have the memory buffers in modern players.
 Brian

--  

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Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
On 01/04/2022 01:13 AM, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:
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When the ZX80 came out it was available as an unassembled kit for $99. I  
don't remember the exact problem but I had to tweak it ti get it to run.

Osborne came out with a 100 column conversion for the Osborne 1. CMOS  
was a new technology and while it normally saved power, dissipation  
increased with frequency. The circuit would work until the chip got hot.  
I replace it with the equivalent LS part and all was good.

Back in those days I could see the components without a microscope so  
component level troubleshooting was feasible.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
rbowman wrote :
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The BBC computer had a similar problem - the early versions had to have  
an heatsink on a certain chip to keep it cool, I half remember. I also  
had a timing issue with an S100 computer I built and partially  
designed. I finally spotted the issue, when I could afford to buy a  
'scope, but by then it was too late - my homebuilt was due for  
replacement with something better.

I think now that designer have simply become more skilled and obviously  
the range of components have improved massively.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
On Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:42:08 +0000, Harry Bloomfield Esq wrote:

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They use logic analysers in simulations now before the design gets  
anywhere near a product.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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You could buy an SX and reenable the coprocessor.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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The ones I encountered were very heavy, so I assume not switching.  I don't remember excessive heat.  It's not like we used to run the CPUs flat out back then.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?
On 01/04/2022 12:05 PM, Commander Kinsey wrote:
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What, you didn't have a Turbo button?

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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I had one on a 386, which didn't even have a heatsink.  That changed it from 8MHz to 16MHz.  I'd so love to travel back in time with some recent kit and laugh at their technology.

Re: Why are engineering sample CPUs illegal to sell?

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I once broke a Pentium 2 or 3 (or that sort of era) by pushing hard with a screwdriver on the heatsink mount.  It slipped and scratched the top of it (the tracks from the actual processor across to the pins).  The technician where I worked had such a steady hand he resoldered it under a microscope.

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