Raspbian Jessie is here

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It's been here for sometime. I upgraded in place about 6 months ago, and have had no problems. If you have a Pi2, I recommend using the Mate desktop as its much nicer than LXDE.

---druck

Reply to
druck

Excellent!

One question though, will there be a 'server' version or something similar? I use my RPis headless and have no need of X or any of the big new applications like Epiphany or LibreOffice. Not installing all the GUI/X stuff will save a lot of space. However I do want to keep up with the latest version if possible.

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Chris Green
Reply to
cl

I am sure once booted you can disable any services you dont need, and leave it with just a login shell

Apt-get remove...all the stuff you don't want.

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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

From the comments on the article: yes.

Reply to
A. Dumas

Yes, it says that there's an option for that, not a problem.

Unfortunately there's not a package called "all the stuff you don't want", it's non-trivial working it out.

Ubuntu provide two options which would be nice in Raspbian:-

Ubuntu Server - a non-GUI package aimed at servers (surprise!) Minimal CD - A really tiny minimal installation where you select the extras you want

Something like either of these would be really useful.

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Chris Green
Reply to
cl

Ah yes, lots of other people saying much the same as me and a positive response saying that a "Raspbian Lite" is in the pipeline. Good!

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Chris Green
Reply to
cl

A "lite" version, with no X or dependencies thereof, is promised in the comments. With the latest wheezy, I've been purging the really big obvious stuff:

python3-minecraftpi python-minecraftpi minecraft-pi wolfram-engine sonic-pi

but dumping X completely would be very welcome.

Reply to
Roger Bell_West

Actually, it isn't non-trivial if you hit the big packages.

dpkg -P xserver-xorg

would be a good starting point. That should toast all the X stuff, and all the stuff dependent on X. That moves you a long way down the field.

Another approach would be to

dpkg -l | grep -i core

and remove the irrelvant core packages that should then remove all the packages dependent on those.

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Reply to
I R A Darth Aggie

I know that on other architectures, it is possible to install Debian via a 'net install'. It works from a small image on flash drive or hard drive. During installation, you can choose whether you want a gui desktop installed or not. So, you may be able to do a minimal install on the pi - I've not explored that possibility though I've done it many times on desktop machines.

Reply to
ray carter

Ha!

Beat me to it. I was about to say exactly the same :)

Actually, I use this route even if I *do* want a gui. That way I know what is being installed.

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W J G
Reply to
Folderol

If you update in place, it will only upgrade the packages which you have currently installed. I recommend backing up the entire card before doing the upgrade and again after, as it's a fairly lengthy process.

---druck

Reply to
druck

Yes, it's what xubuntu (and presumably other ubuntu versions) calls the 'minimal/cd install'.

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Chris Green
Reply to
cl

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says "It might not be exactly what you're after, but a lite image is coming soon. It won?t have any of the bundled additional software, and won't have X. You could always build up from there."

It has been done:

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Reply to
Alan Braggins

The net install is even more minimal than that. It installs from the internet - basically it's the installer.

Reply to
ray carter

And here:

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down at the bottom.

Another Dave

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Reply to
Another Dave

Thanks for that.

I've just done an in-situ upgrade of wheezy->jessie(steps 1-5 followed by a reboot and installation of rc-gui alacarte, all other stuff ignored since I almost never use anything except a command line via SSH to drive it) and all is good apart from a couple of small points:

- The upgrade clouted .profile in root (easily fixed by copying the one in my usual user and replacing all escaped '\$' ocurrences in the PS1 strings with '\#'. I much prefer the prompt to be just '$ ' or '# ' depending on who I'm logged in as and with the current directory shown in the console's title bar.

- /etc/sudoers had changed.

Anyway, after fixing those points I rebooted again and ran my usual upgrade script, which does this:

apt-get autoclean apt-get dist-upgrade apt-get update apt-get upgrade It ran as expected, i.e. didn't get anything new, but the initial autocleam did throw away a shedload of old packages which reclaimed a good 0.8 GB of storage space.

Where did the reboot authentication dialogue come from? Is it part of the rc-gui package?

One oddity that I've noticed is that after a a shutdown via 'sudo halt' the now RPi stops with the yellow,green,green,red LEDs on and only the green activity LED off. All the LEDs are steady except that the green alongside the yellow blinks once every 7 or 8 seconds. Before the upgrade it used to stop with just the red LED lit.

This is an RPi 2B. Has anybody else seen this different halting behaviour post upgrade?

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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie

Did you do that in that order? in straight debian, I would "update", "upgrade", then "dist-upgrade". I rarely do autoclean, but that's not a bad ideal. If you don't need many locales, you may want the localepurge package to purge non-used locale files from your system.

That's an astounding amount of stuff!

halt's behaviour seems to have changed. It used to go to a poweroff state, but now seems to go to everything is stopped but not powered down.

There are some other commands worth looking at:

poweroff reboot shutdown

Depending on the arguments one feeds shutdown, it can power off, halt or reboot the system. But they're legacy commands for compatibility. Looks like systemctl is doing the actual work. This is for a systemd configured Debian, so that may not apply to your Raspbian.

Scroll down for the poweroff/reboot/shutdown majik:

formatting link

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Reply to
I R A Darth Aggie

Background: I'm really a Fedora person: I've been running RedHat distros since RH 6.2 and Fedora from 1 to 22, though with a few skipped along the way. Both my bigger boxes use Fedora and in consequence I find using apt- get less straight-forward than yum (and now dnf since F21).

Initially I was just using update, upgrade in that order. Then I decided that dist-upgrade would be useful, and read the manpage which doens't give a preferred order (why not fer chrissakes?) but seemed to be hinting that that it should preceed update, so that's where it is run.

About a year back I discovered autoclean and put it first on the grounds that its nice to clean house before getting in more stuff. In fact I don't think it matters whether its first or last because, with the sequence being run about once a week, it is always run after the last upgrade in the cycle. I think the same argument applies to dist-upgrade. BTW, one of my first action was to disable auto-update because I like to do a backup before an update/upgrade sequence. Similarly, I've used the same manual backup+update sequence for years on the Fedora boxes.

Yes, I thought so. This RPi was one of the first batch of 512MB B models and its been updated roughly weekly since then. Cruft has accumulated, even with the last year's inclusion of autoclean in the upodate cycle. It had steadily grown: when first installed df showed about 2.2 GB of stuff on the SD card and, up to last week that had steadily grown to 3.2 GB. Somewhere along the line my original 4GB card got replaced with an 8GB one. Anyway, I noticed that after jessie had been installed the card had about 3.5 3.6 GB of stuff on it and that running my update sequence reported a lot of package deletions, so was pleasantly surprised to see that post autoclean df is reporting that 2.8GB of the card is used.

Thanks for that.

Yes, manual Fedora shutdowns usually take the form "sudo shutdown -h NOW" but I normally (lazily) shut down with the button on the login screen and I haven't tried to find out what command it uses for reboot or halt.

I've always just assumed that reboot, halt and poweroff were just convenience wrappers for shutdown. If fact I'd never run across them until I got the RPi: all the Unices I've used and early Redhat Linux tended to assume that you would just user shutdown.

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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
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Reply to
Martin Gregorie

On the Debian site, you'll find that the proper order (after having changed the sources.list file) is:

update upgrade dist-upgrade

Reply to
ray carter

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