ARMv8.1?

Disagree about 'every device' - I bought a TZ70 bridge camera last September, which came with a USB data/charging cable but no wall wart. Full marks to Panasonic: that cable works just fine with my older Pentax WG1 snapper too.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Martin Gregorie
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Not entirely: ever since USB connection began to be used for charging as well as data its been obvious, to me anyway, that it would be a good idea to standardise on it for charging and/or powering everything that needs to be charged or fed with external power.
However, since device manufacturers had spent money of developing their own proprietary power adapters it followed that they'd be resistant to changing to any universal equivalent and possible modifying their cash cows to accept a different voltage, somebody with a lot of clout needed to wield the big stick.
The EU took on that job, so good on them for doing it.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Martin Gregorie
Hooray!
My LF1 (also Panasonic) came with a charger, but that was bought in mid- 2013.
Cameras are often inconvenient for a different reason, mind: they often use a single socket for USB & video-out, which means they use a non- standard proprietary connector & cable.
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Cheers, 
John
Reply to
John Aldridge
Just came across a URL that points out the genesis of RPi3 in 2011 and the introduction of ARMv8.1 in 2014.
Having been brought up on the PDP11 and 80X86, an architecture that does not allow operations directly on memory to be somewhat strange,
eg
LD m to A LD n to B Add A to B ST B to n
Whereas ADD A to B is only one instruction.
However, I do realise that the total byte count for the instruction sequence in a register machine might compare favourably with the (sometimes) 9 bytes of an 80X86 or the 6 bytes of a PDP11.
Having no experience of register-only machines, are there any coding examples in assembler for the ARM that I could peruse, it always being easier to copy another's ideas than to re-invent the wheel and call it fire.
Reply to
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
The TZ70 has two sockets alongside each other - the micro-USB for power and data and another, slightly smaller one (for video-out IIRC - I don't use or need it). They didn't supply a cable for that.
About the only niggle I have with the TZ70, other than the viewfinder lag which becomes apparent at full zoom, is that there's no external charger available. If you carry a spare battery its annoying to have to put the battery you want to charge into the camera to do so. The little Pentax came with an external mains-connected charger, which is, somehow, more convenient.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Martin Gregorie
it is not only the bite count but also the number of clock cycles
on a RISC processor the aim is to have each instruction execute in 1 clock cycle (Depending on the exact processor some instructions may take additional cycles but these are in the minority) a cisc processor such as the 80X86 series may take many cycles for a single instruction. usually more than is required for the equivalent sequence in a RISC processor.
I recall that even the ancient z80 had a "Load Increment Repeat" instruction that would streamline the code needed for a loop structure but it took some 20 cycles to execute. performing the task individually would result in larger code but faster execution times...
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Reply to
alister
How about downloading sources and compiling yourself?
Reply to
Rob Morley
Frankly, no. Not one that wouldn't have been done better and easier by quietly going around agreeing on stuff in a completely apolitical way, like e.g. agreeing on what a 'meter' or a 'second' actually is.
If standards have to be enforced they are probably unnecessary or unwanted.
Why wouldn't European manufacturers want to manufacture to common standards.
The only faintly useful thing I ever remember was enforcing on car manufacturers to publish their specs so that 'pattern parts' could be made to break the cartel on car spares.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Will three do ?
The Euro - a boon to anyone travelling in Europe.
Freedom to live and work anywhere in the EU.
Freedom to trade anywhere in the EU.
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Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:>WIN                                      | A better way to focus the sun 
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Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
Yeah, another 10 years or so and the venerable USB 2.0 connectors might actually not be included on everything made on earth... but I wouldn't bet on it.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
Really? It was about the cost of developing a connector? I think not. It was all about being proprietary and making you come to them for a new charger. I remember buying a new phone of the same brand which used a different connector than the old one.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
Yes I did, although briefly as my Pi3 is used as a home sever.
It seemed to work perfectly, and with a significant performance increase from a 32bit OS. I'll be giving it another go soon, and doing some benchmarking.
---druck
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druck
And an economic disater for any government except Germany.
A complete disaster as pile of Romanians Lithuanians and others charge over to take advantage of an NHS and benefits system they never paid for.
Golly. I didn't know we needed the EU for that. How come I can trade with china,India, USA, Australia, South Africa, kenya, Nigeria.... when they aren't in the EU?
Remember the EU is not a free trade zone. Its a protected industry zone, set up by a communist to keep European workers in jobs
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always run out of other people's money. It's quite a characteristic of them" 
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
And a disaster for the smaller economy's that rushed to adopt it
Causing economic migrants as people from a poor country flood a Richer one without any control.
I will give you that one, but then that WAS the original reason for the "Common Market" as it was then called. The current quest to for a United states of Europe is unnecessary & unwanted.
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Reply to
alister
No, it wasn't the original reason for the common market, it was the stated reason for it.
It is quite clear that it was set up from the outset as a neo communist superstate.
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Read what I wrote: its the requirement to modify device designs using supply voltages other than 5v and proprietary connectors that that will cost the mfrs money and cause them to stick with proprietary.
While I'm certain that the likes of Apple make money by gouging their fanboys for the latest funny-socket adapter or cable, its not so obvious that the same applies to the other brands that stick to COTS connectors and wall rats made in 4th world countries.
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martin@   | Martin Gregorie 
gregorie. | Essex, UK 
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Martin Gregorie
I did read what you wrote. "However, since device manufacturers had spent money of developing their own proprietary power adapters it followed that they'd be resistant to changing to any universal equivalent". That is what I am taking exception to. They never had to "modify" their connectors. All they had to do was stop using them and use another one off the shelf, likely at a lower cost. So the cost of the connector was not in any way a factor, recurring cost or non-recurring cost.
The voltage issue is also a red herring. They redesign phones every day, literally. The sales life of a product is about six months or less before it is replaced by the newer model. How many new designs a year does that equate to? Redesigning a phone necessitates reviewing all the power circuits, with an eye to improving them if nothing else.
Apple sticks with their connectors because they are more than just a charging point and size is everything. Apple products cost more and are harder to produce because of the extremes they go to in making their products small. I have no doubt they would use the micro-usb connector if there was no good reason not to. The apple connectors are superior too. A friend has one that is held magnetically. If you kick the cord it simply unplugs, no damage. That! should be mandated by the EU.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman
The RPi dates from 2011. The Cortex A53 was announced October 2012, while ARMv8-A was announced Oct 2011 and ARMv8.1-A December 2014. Which is why I said it's v8.0 (pedantically that's written as v8-A).
There's plenty of material for A32 (the new name for the 32-bit ARM instruction set[1]). For instance:
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For A64, I don't know of a good introduction that doesn't assume you have used a RISC assembly language (eg A32) before.
Theo
[1] ARM's marketing department really needs help - not only do we have ARM7 (a 1990s CPU core) and ARMv7 (the architecture of the original RPi 2), we now have A32 (the 32 bit ISA) and Cortex-A32 (a recent 32 bit ARMv8-A core).
Reply to
Theo Markettos
Thanks, bookmarked for later study
32 or 64, the broad ideas will be the same, just need a few examples to then run with the ball. I guess I'm a bit like Richard Feynman who could soar highly in abstract ideas, provided only that he an elementary real exampe upon which to anchor his knowledge.
For example, I had trouble envisaging the Magnetic Vector Potential, A, until one day at the railway station standing too close to the platform edge when a train went by causing eddies of dust. (Don't ask!)
Reply to
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
One of the beyond expectations successes of the EU is the standards.
Bar none. They have gotten uniform automobile standards, are getting pretty close to uniform building standards (but codes from place to place can vary, not everywhere have 3 m snow loads etc).
Just the electrics have undergone a silent revolution in Europe.
-- mrr
Reply to
Morten Reistad

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