JTAG wiggler

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I am new to embedded programming and I am working on MPC8xx. What
exactly is JTAG wiggler and how will it help me with the development? I
tried to find info on it and most groups say that it speeds up
development process. Thanks in advance....


Re: JTAG wiggler
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Google for Macraigor Wiggler.

JTAG allows a direct interface to the heart of the processor and access
to its pins so, with a suitable programmer you can program your target
board but alos see what is happening within it as the program is
running.



Re: JTAG wiggler

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First of all thanks for the response. I looked at that and the data
sheet also but did not make much sense.
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So for example I have a simple SPI driver for target board using MPC8xx
but I am waiting for another board which will interface with my target
board. Till then will this wiggler help me to understand what the
program is doing and if its doing what it is supposed to do? Thanks
once again....


Re: JTAG wiggler


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not likely,  a wiggler is a very poor (but very cheap) debugging tool,
it's for downloading, reading and writing data, setting breakpoints, it
debugs sort of like a print statement in software


Re: JTAG wiggler

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I have also found it to be really slow.

-Isaac


Re: JTAG wiggler
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They never do until you find out what you wanted to know some other way
;-)

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There are much better JTAG probes out there than the wiggler but they do
cost a bit more (99 for Rowley's CrossLink and IIRC about 300 for
Segger's J-Link but the prices are on their websites). The better
probers use USB interface rather than the parallel port because
sometimes quite a bit of data needs to be moved about.

I think the reason the data sheet is not much use to you is because you
are not too sure what the probe is for.

The first thing you can do with a probe is download your software into
your target board. Then, if you have debugging software then you can run
that code on your target and the probe gives you the power to stop and
start the target, set breakpoints (i.e. stop when a line of code is
reached in the program), examine the contents of registers and memory
and also to step through your code line by line.

The debugging software will most likely be a part of your compiler and
not of the Wiggler itself. The Wiggler will come with drivers that will
allow your debugger to communicate with it but, once you have that set
up, it shouldn't matter too much what type of probe you have - it is
just a link to the target.

If you don't have a debugger then you will have very little that you can
do with the probe - I don't know what compiler you are using so I can't
say more on that. You might even be using an assembler.

For your SPI application then (assuming you have a debugger) then you
can set a breakpoint after your routine to initialise the SPI interface
to allow you to stop and check all the appropriate registers have the
values you expect in them. You can then set breakpoints in your send and
recieve functions so that you can see when and if data is being sent or
received and if that data is what you expect. It will help you to
determine if you are at fault or the other guy.

Basically, once you see the possibilities of seeing which line of code
is being executed and what the target is doing then you will quickly
think of your own places in the code you want to test.

The difference in more expensive probes comes when you want to move
large chunks of data or keep log of data as it moves through the
processor. Some will put breakpoints into flash as well - which not all
probes can do.



Re: JTAG wiggler
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They never do until you find out what you wanted to know some other way
;-)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

There are much better JTAG probes out there than the wiggler but they do
cost a bit more (99 for Rowley's CrossLink and IIRC about 300 for
Segger's J-Link but the prices are on their websites). The better
probers use USB interface rather than the parallel port because
sometimes quite a bit of data needs to be moved about.

I think the reason the data sheet is not much use to you is because you
are not too sure what the probe is for.

The first thing you can do with a probe is download your software into
your target board. Then, if you have debugging software then you can run
that code on your target and the probe gives you the power to stop and
start the target, set breakpoints (i.e. stop when a line of code is
reached in the program), examine the contents of registers and memory
and also to step through your code line by line.

The debugging software will most likely be a part of your compiler and
not of the Wiggler itself. The Wiggler will come with drivers that will
allow your debugger to communicate with it but, once you have that set
up, it shouldn't matter too much what type of probe you have - it is
just a link to the target.

If you don't have a debugger then you will have very little that you can
do with the probe - I don't know what compiler you are using so I can't
say more on that. You might even be using an assembler.

For your SPI application then (assuming you have a debugger) then you
can set a breakpoint after your routine to initialise the SPI interface
to allow you to stop and check all the appropriate registers have the
values you expect in them. You can then set breakpoints in your send and
recieve functions so that you can see when and if data is being sent or
received and if that data is what you expect. It will help you to
determine if you are at fault or the other guy.

Basically, once you see the possibilities of seeing which line of code
is being executed and what the target is doing then you will quickly
think of your own places in the code you want to test.

The difference in more expensive probes comes when you want to move
large chunks of data or keep log of data as it moves through the
processor. Some will put breakpoints into flash as well - which not all
probes can do.




Re: JTAG wiggler

Sorry, I hate duplicated posts but poxy Outlook promised that it wasn't
able to send the first one.

At least I'm not replying to my own posts.

Oh...



Re: JTAG wiggler
Excellent Book:

Embedded system design on a shoestring : acieving high performance with
a limited budget / Lewin Edwards

Covers the use of the Macraigor JTAG wiggler!

Why don't you come and join my new group:
http://groups.google.com/group/realtime_signal_and_control

Frank

Tom Lucas wrote:
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Re: JTAG wiggler

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<Top post fixed to avoid the swoop of the Falcon...>
<snip some more>

Excellent Book:

Embedded system design on a shoestring : acieving high performance with
a limited budget / Lewin Edwards

Covers the use of the Macraigor JTAG wiggler!

Why don't you come and join my new group:
http://groups.google.com/group/realtime_signal_and_control

What does this group offer that isn't covered by comp.realtime,
comp.arch.embedded or sci.engr.control? I refuse to use google so how am
I to access it?




Re: JTAG wiggler - correction
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Sorry, for some reason my chevrons didn't appear in the last post so
here they are to make things clearer.

What does this group offer that isn't covered by comp.realtime,
comp.arch.embedded or sci.engr.control? I refuse to use google so how am
I to access it?




Re: JTAG wiggler - correction
Of course there is going to be overlap.  But here is it's anticipated
scope.  Since it is new, its really pretty wide open.  You can
communicate with it via email.

I'll see if I can invite you, or even just add you.


Real Time Signals, Controls, Communications, and Environments

industrial automation, machine control, home automation, automatic
test, signal processing, automatic test, signal processing,
communications, machine intelligence.


analog electroincs, interface, power, instrumentation, low noise, low
distortion, RF.


audio, digital and analog.


Open Source software and Open Standards for all of the above.


* Group name: RealTime_Signal_and_Control
* Group home page:
http://groups.google.com/group/realtime_signal_and_control
* Group email address realtime_signal_and snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com

Tom Lucas wrote:
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