Why does the Raspberry Pi exist?

I've got a 24x7 Atom server. Is there any way to hook a PI up to SATA drives?
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Ineptocracy 

(in-ep-toc?-ra-cy) ? a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
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and design their websites for access down a 56k modem too.
MY websites are...
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Ineptocracy 

(in-ep-toc?-ra-cy) ? a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
USB->SATA adaptor.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
What do you want to do with it?
If you want to learn about computers, try to stay away from the mindset that it's a PC. If you approach it like a 10 year old would, there's plenty of resources out there.
If you approach it expecting a conversion course from Windows then sooner or later you'll get frustrated that it doesn't do something the same way. Then you'll end up randomly googling - there'll be a guide on some blog somewhere that answers the direct question, but perhaps the main thing is not get stuck in the mindset of expecting it to do what a normal Windows PC does.
And for the Pi I ought to point out that it doesn't just run Linux, other operating systems are available. So if the Linux way of doing things doesn't appeal, try something else.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
Come on, the rPi is about half a cray-2 in scalar performance, and about half a cray-1 in vector performance. Not what I would call "slow" by my standards.
USB to SATA enclosure?
-- mrr
Reply to
Morten Reistad
The phrase to look for is ?dynamic binary translation?: you translate blocks of code from the target?s instruction set to the host?s and then execute the result (and cache it). Essentially it?s a JIT compiler for the target architecture.
As it happens QEMU does indeed work this way.
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http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/
Reply to
Richard Kettlewell
I don't know the answer, but I'd start with xcopy.
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Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire 
alan@adamshome.org.uk 
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Reply to
Alan Adams
run via a powered hub, because the pi definitely won't supply enough power over USB to run a hard drive.
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Alan Adams, from Northamptonshire 
alan@adamshome.org.uk 
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Reply to
Alan Adams
Play
Approaching it like a 10 year old would should be easy for me.
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I think I am an Elephant, 
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Reply to
Peter Percival
Why not log on as administrator and drag and drop? Thats what windows was designed for.
Reply to
Bill Door
I see they are available from Farnell and RS (any others?). Model B is 28.07 pounds + 5.95 pounds delivery from the first, and 31.20 + 4.95 from the second. Is there any reason to choose one over the other apart from price?
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Reply to
Peter Percival
Opinions differ, but they both mostly get stuff to one in a reasonably timely way.
Reply to
Roger Bell_West
How are you going to select files by owner without selecting them one by one and right-clicking, clicking through several screens to find the owner of each file?
Reply to
Rob
Windows files are in that owners folder. If they are not in a designated folder they are in an all users folder or group users folder.
Reply to
Bill Door
Ok say they are in an all users folder, or a shared folder on a server. How are you going to select files by owner?
It is not so simple. And it shows that even in a GUI not everything is straightforward.
In Linux you could do:
find / -type f -user (username) -print
and when it looks OK then:
find /directory -type f -user (username) -exec mv {} /archive \;
but that is the kind of thing you need to look up in manpages when you are not familiar with the system. So go find it on Windows, in helpfiles or somesuch.
Reply to
Rob
In a common folder they are owned by anyone. In a shared folder they are owned by that group. In Rob's folder only Rob and someone with administrative privileges can access them unless Rob changes permissions.
In windows server 2003 (wot I last worked on before I retired) you log on as administrator and go to rob's folder. Click on it and copy it across.
No need. Files are not so much owned in windows as accessed by permissions.
Reply to
Bill Doors
Ok, so you don't know about file ownership in Windows. No problem... just move on!
Reply to
Rob
Doesn't exist
Reply to
Bill Dorrs
So what are the owner and group SIDs in the security descriptor for then?
Reply to
Guesser
MM. looking ta the overall cost and casing requirements, it seems not worth the trouble and expense.
i.e if you want linux with big storage, stay with the Atom.
--
Ineptocracy 

(in-ep-toc?-ra-cy) ? a system of government where the least capable to lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a diminishing number of producers.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

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