Why does the Raspberry Pi exist?

I don't believe it does at all. VirtualBox will pass through USB devices to a Windows guest, though. (And this is part of VBox is now freely available, which it previously wasn't).
Not that this is relevant for the Pi - unless you fancy running an x86->ARM emulator. Slowly.
Theo
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Theo Markettos
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On 20 Jun 2013 00:45:34 +0100 (BST), Theo Markettos declaimed the following:
Class 10 cards are rated for streaming video; ie, single file I/O on a freshly formatted card.
Classes 2/4/6 are rated on fragmented cards.
While I'm surprised that a Class 10 could be /that/ bad when it encounters fragmentation and multiple file requests... I have no experience (my video cameras still use miniDV TAPE)
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Dennis Lee Bieber
AFAIK they have relevent degrees in a science. At least one has a PHD (Physics). I don't think you can get a degree in flower arranging but ICBW.
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Mark
it was probably and earlier version of GNU/Linux which was designed for lower memory computers.
It's the official RPi OS (debian).
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Mark
That's ok if there's a choice. If the child (oh, sorry, student) has to take it home to do their homework, or if it gets broken during compulsory lessons, then it's not.
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Reply to
Peter Percival
It?s Debian wheezy rebuilt with an ABI suitable for the RPi. The relationship to Ubuntu is that Ubuntu is derived from Debian. AFAIK there?s no inherent reason you could?t do the same starting from Ubuntu rather than from Debian.
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Reply to
Richard Kettlewell
Which is entirely missing the point of the Rpi! my DIL works for a furniture-making company which now uses RPis to control the painting machines. I use them to run webcams and control my central heating. My son's dept at work is using 8 RPis to monitor a large server room. All of these are "headless" - ie no display, keyboard, mouse, whatever. Low cost, very reliable and small footprint.
Reply to
Bob Martin
If school children are going to learn to do those sorts of things, then three cheers for the Raspberry Pi. It's a big if though.
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Reply to
Peter Percival
As I said 'a component, not a PC..'
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The Natural Philosopher
On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 15:31:45 +0100, Peter Percival , > Salvatore wrote:
Really? sorry, there's no such thing as "free". Someone paid for that, probably including you. And probably quite a bit. Go ask for your school district's IT budget for their break down on costs.
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Reply to
I R A Darth Aggie
The intended goal of RPi project was TV set top box. Very commercial and very competitive market. However RPi was unlucky in this application. So they had to come up with some other use to recoup costs.
Vladimir Vassilevsky DSP and Mixed Signal Designs
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Vladimir Vassilevsky
Well they did a good job anyway then.
actually equipped with a USB tuner, it probably would make a decent STB .,..
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Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
What I meant was: why buy Raspberry Pis when PCs are already in the school?
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Reply to
Peter Percival
10/10 for the most entertaining answer so far!
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Peter Percival
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 13:39:54 +0000 (UTC) in comp.sys.raspberry-pi, I R A Darth Aggie wrote,
In most cases you would be right, but a computer that is several years old and already depreciated on the books to a value of $0.00 is as about as close to free as anything can get. In some cases schools even have to pay someone to haul it away and dispose of it, when except for bureaucratic stupidity they could *give* it to that previously mentioned "one bright spark" student.
And while you are at it, go ask Al Capone for a breakdown on the costs of organized crime.
Reply to
David Harmon
Congratulations on your incisive reasoning powers. It was Slackware three-point-something, which was contemporary with the hardware described above. These days you need to be selective in what you run on low power machines, the default desktop environment and software choices in most distros are going to be much too heavy. I usually start with a minimal Debian installation (and possibly a custom kernel) rather than going to one of the specialist distros like Puppy, which can be somewhat idiosyncratic.
Well yes, I believe I already pointed that out somewhere upthread, but the subject at hand was choice of software to run, rather than the base OS/repo.
Reply to
Rob Morley
Back to the good old days of optimising every cycle and byte. :-) I do think the RPi is giving people pause for thought, when they realise how much of "normal PC" work can be done with a Pi. I've occasionally played with Via ITX boards, which are quite similar spec (but x86, with all the usual PC interfaces) commonly used as thin clients.
Today's silicon is generally more than fast enough for most applications anyway, the new-Windows, new-PC upgrade cycle of the past couple of decades has pretty much broken down as people are finding they can do a lot of their usual stuff with low power mobile kit, consoles and STBs, and the PC they bought 5 years ago still does what they want. Modern servers are looking more like mini supercomputers, with masses of low power units racked (and in some cases clustered) together rather than a few high power CPUs.
Reply to
Rob Morley
Ah, now there's a potential stumbling block. :-(
Wine runs in user mode, it can only use hardware that's already enabled in the kernel, and Windows drivers generally aren't (although there is at least one exception I can think of - ndiswrapper provides Windows APIs so that some Windows drivers, primarily wireless network devices, can run under Linux).
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Rob Morley
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 15:35:45 +0100, Peter Percival , > I R A Darth Aggie wrote:
Because then the little darlin's can use an inexpensive computer to experiment on? you know, doing things other than learning how to start Word or Excel?
Otherwise, computer "literacy" will consist of being able to open the Office products[*], and being able to make use of them. I wouldn't be terribly surprised if that also involves using IE to make use of the web.
[*
] of which LibreOffice or OpenOffice will not count
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I R A Darth Aggie
On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 09:16:28 -0700, David Harm> On Thu, 20 Jun 2013 13:39:54 +0000 (UTC) in comp.sys.raspberry-pi, I
Wow, really? you mean to say your "public servants" aren't? you're advertising a netcom.com adddy, which implies a USian. I am a USian, and I can ask my school district for that information.
Of course, I live in an open records state, so they really can't say no.
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I R A Darth Aggie

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