Questions abour RPi 4B

On Tue, 8 Sep 2020 10:24:19 +0100, "NY" declaimed the following:
Didn't apply when I was filling out "Personal Security Questionaires" for clearances two lives ago... I had to provide birth places for my mother's parents. Those were JUST a house number with no named streets. So: H#, village name.
Somehow I really doubt DISCO agents bothered to cross the border into Soviet Czechoslovakia just to talk to the neighbors about my maternal grandparents (who'd moved to Germany pre-WW2, and were in West Germany post-war division).
--
	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
Loading thread data ...
I combined the two things. Make a first copy of the card when its out of the Pi, then secondly every night update this copy with any files that have changed, without needing to take the card out the Pi again.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Other favourites are San Francisco (house numbers start wherever the street does, so on two adjacent streets that start in different places the house numbers don't line up), and London (streets change names every few blocks and the numbers start over each time).
--
/~\  Charlie Gibbs                  |  Microsoft is a dictatorship. 
\ /        |  Apple is a cult. 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Charlie Gibbs
In general in the UK it's rare for house numbers to reach 4 digits.
Reply to
Andy Burns
Whereas here in the Fraser Valley (south and west of Vancouver), many areas share the same numbering system which stretches east for 50 miles or so. Most house numbers have 5 digits.
--
/~\  Charlie Gibbs                  |  Microsoft is a dictatorship. 
\ /        |  Apple is a cult. 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Charlie Gibbs
Huh? *Of course* numbering starts where the street starts. I had never heard of the alternative, I suppose it comes with grid street plans, which are awful & car centric & dehumanising.
Reply to
A. Dumas
In message , A. Dumas writes
But where does a street start ? Mine is T shaped.
Adrian
--
To Reply : 
replace "bulleid" with "adrian" - all mail to bulleid is rejected 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Adrian
Numbering ? What is this numbering ? Next you'll be telling me you have names for your streets with signs to tell you what they are.
Well one alternative is the rural Irish approach, roads are mostly unnamed instead small regions are named (but there are no signs to tell you the names). Houses are sometimes named but mostly not, the postman has to know who lives where because twenty or thirty houses on two or three streets all have the same address[1]. Couriers insist on phone numbers before accepting packages. This venerable system has recently grown postcodes ... every delivery point has a unique postcode so you need a map of them to find anything.
[1] And yes banks and the like do require proof of address.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
If there is a known chaotic system, workarounds such as always using phone numbers are put in place. In England where most of the time street numbering follows some sort of logic, there is little ability to cope with outliers.
Ours is a new house in quite a long street, they gave us a postcode which isn't the same as the houses around us, its from 300m further up the road, and the houses have names and not numbers. Every delivery bloke on the planet has driven straight past, stopped further up, and then phoned to say they couldn't find us. Lucky the other side of the road has sequential numbers, so we have to tell everyone we are opposite number 44.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Have you any idea why you weren't given the same postcode as the houses on either side? Simple cockup or....
However, the effect reminds me of parts of the Dutch-Belgian border near Baarle-Nassau is near as dammit fractal, with Dutch houses and villages completely surrounded by Belgium and vice versa. It shows up well on Google Earth. Other parts of the same border such as the part north of Houthalen-Helcheren are also fairly spectacularly convoluted, but come nowhere near the confusion around Baarle-Nassau.
--
Martin    | martin at 
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
We live in a small village in Suffolk which is mostly made up of land settlement association housing built in the 1920s and 1930s to rehouse and give jobs to unemployed miners.
The house numbers are simply the land settlement plot numbers starting at 1 at one end of the village and running to 50 or so at the other end. Each road just has some of the numbers, our road runs from 30 to 46. Just to add to the fun the numbers are not (quite) in order along the road. It keeps delivery drivers on their toes! :-)
--
Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
The post office is a law unto themselves.
Now, any idea how we can bring this back on topic for the Pi 4B?
---druck
Reply to
druck
Probably a good idea! The USB tuner came with a rigid adaptor, which is what I've used, but a flexible one is better, as long as its mini plug is a good fit for the mini socket in the tuner. The rigid adaptor was not a tight fit (oo er!) so it tended to withdraw too easily (oo, matronnnnnnn!!!).
Reply to
NY
My parents live on a long A road between two towns. There are *almost* continuous houses along the whole length. The road is variously known as Wendover Road, Aylesbury; Wendover Road, Weston Turville; Wendover Road, Stoke Mandeville; Aylesbury Road, Wendover. And each of those has its own numbering. The Weston Turville and Stoke Mandeville numbering systems relate to houses that are opposite to each other, with the boundary between two villages running down the centre line of the road.
But in general, it is easier to find a house if it has a number rather than a name, because if you find number 10 and further on number 20, then you can *usually* be sure that number 16 will be close by - and *probably* on the same (even numbers) side of the road.
Mind you, the road where we live has names for most of the houses, with a short terrace of numbered houses somewhere amongst that.
Reply to
NY
When you say T-shaped, do you mean it's a cul-de-sac which joins another road at the base of the T? I'd expect the numbering to start at the junction between your road and another, and to continue either consecutively or else alternately odd/even around the various legs of the T.
The problem comes when you have houses which back onto the nearby roads, with the front doors (and therefore the letterboxes) facing each other across a traffic-free central "village green". I discovered one like this when I was trying to find someone's house. There wasn't even pedestrian access from the road to each house, with a number on the roadside. Instead you had to know that there was a single alleyway that gave access to the front doors of all the houses. Ironically, the people I was visiting didn't use their front door (which had the letter box in it) and had made a small extra room (as a home office) in that area. So I got to the front door, knocked on it, and was met with gesticulation to go to the back door.
Reply to
NY
On Wed, 9 Sep 2020 07:37:38 +0200, "A. Dumas" declaimed the following:
In many areas, numbering is based on distance from "center" (often city hall), regardless of where the street itself starts/ends. Even numbers on one side of the street, odd on the other, with house numbers tending to jump by 10s or 20s (possible 10th of a mile). {I'm about 1.5 miles west of city hall, house number is 1490}
Overall, the county numbers based on center of Grand Rapids, with quadrant marker... So just outside of my city limits is a Ford dealer with a number of 11979 Fulton E (Fulton is the divider for N/S) and it is adjacent to a bank at 2601 W Main.
--
	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber
"The latest updates" seems to be my stumbling block. I'd done "sudo apt update" and "sudo apt full-upgrade" on the Pi 3B+ before imaging the card and creating a copy onto a new cad for the Pi 4. But I still got
formatting link

recover4.elf not found fixup_rc.dat not found recovery.elf is not compatible
So I started again from scratch, installing from the latest NOOBS. I'm tempted to try copying all the files from the new card's recovery partition to the old card's, to see if it helps? But that would be to satisfy my curiosity: since the new NOOBS comes with Raspbian Buster rather than Stretch, I may as well use that.
I came across a couple of "funnies" as I was setting up the new Pi. The old one was quite happy to boot without a monitor plugged in (I use my Pis headless, accessed by VNC) whereas the new one wouldn't boot. The solution is to add/modify a few lines in /boot/config.txt:
hdmi_force_hotplug=1 # allow Pi to boot with no monitor connected hdmi_group=2 hdmi_mode=82 # force 1920x1080x60 even though monitor can?t be auto-detected
to allow the PI to boot with no monitor, and to force 1920x1080 mode for the benefit of VNC.
Strangely, I couldn't get it to go into CEA mode 31 (1920x1080x50, rather than 60) with
hdmi_group=1 hdmi_mode=31
because this still gave (according to my monitor, when I plugged it in) 60 Hz frame rate. But it doesn't really matter since the Pi will mostly be used headless - apart from occasionally driving our telly when we want to browse something - or to watch a webcam such as elephants in a safari park in Kenya :-)
Reply to
NY
I don't find grids dehumanizing. When I'm walking to somewhere on a cross street several blocks away, it's nice to be able to look at house numbers on the way and creatively modify my route so that I come out at the right place.
There's another variation on a street near my home. It's on the boundary between two districts that use different grids, so the numbers on one side have no relation to the ones on the other side.
--
/~\  Charlie Gibbs                  |  Microsoft is a dictatorship. 
\ /        |  Apple is a cult. 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Charlie Gibbs
In message , NY writes
The base of the T is the entry/exit point, and there is a cul de sac at each end of the horizontal. Numbering starts at the left hand end of the horizontal, and works along to the right hand end, odds on one side, evens on the other. Originally, there were only two houses with entrances onto the upright (one each side), but as they are corner plot semis, they are numbered in sequence. One of those has since been the subject of a garden grab, so the upright now has one property fully on it. Then just to further confuse the issue, more houses were added at the left hand end. These have names not numbers. For some reason, when built the upright had a different name (which meant that just about everyone was on a straight road), but at some point TPTB decided to give the upright the same name as the horizontal. Confused, yup, you along with most delivery drivers.
And if you think that is bad, I used to live near a village where the houses on the main road (which was most of them) were numbered in chronological order. I think that changed to something more conventional in the 50s.
Adrian
--
To Reply : 
replace "bulleid" with "adrian" - all mail to bulleid is rejected 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Adrian
On Wed, 9 Sep 2020 15:43:04 +0100, "NY" declaimed the following:
The Pi 4 REQUIRES Buster. So much so that the Raspberry Pi foundation had to release Raspbian based on a Debian release candidate -- Debian didn't release final Buster until some two or three weeks AFTER the Pi 4 went on the market.
--
	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber

ElectronDepot website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.