Looking for VNC

Re: Re: Looking for VNC By: NY to F. W. on Mon Jun 14 2021 10:13 am
One of the great frustrations I have is in googling any number of technical issues, sometimes dozens of hits on the subject I am googling consist of people asking the same question, and these useless "Google it," replies (often with some obnoxious verbiage attached.)
The effect is that over time, Google search results pile up with these pointless replies, making finding the solution difficult. Like, "I *am* Googling this, right now, and all I find are abusive replies to other people saying "Google it."
I appreciate people who take the time to link to specific URLs; that is always a fair response.
Reply to
Chris Hizny
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What term do you type in to find VNC-Server for RPI?
FW
Reply to
F. W.
sudo raspi-config ... 3 Interface options ... 3 VNC
Reply to
A. Dumas
The danger of posing such a question herein is that the immature woke generation will lambast you for not googling.
Their combined abusive attitude does nothing more than to call into question the very existence of this discussion forum for surely, every point that has been raised here in recent months could have been resolved by googling?
Anyway, looking at the recent VNC thread about headless installation, before I actually get around to commissioning any of my RPis, are there any pitfalls to be avoided when setting up a domestic TV as the HDMI display for an RPi?
Reply to
gareth evans
Thank you!
FW
Reply to
F. W.
I did googling but I am not very experienced with RPi yet.
FW
Reply to
F. W.
Make sure you've got overscan turned off at the Pi and the TV so the TV actually shows the full extent of the desktop including the Raspberry Pi "start" button at the bottom left and the clock at the bottom right of the taskbar.
Make sure the Pi is set to a CEA rather than DMT video mode so any sound the Pi generates is sent by HDMI to the TV. That one baffled me until I learned of the difference a few day ago.
Reply to
NY
As far as I am concerned, I have no problem with people asking FAQs and questions that have already been answered or can be found on Google. The problem with Google is sometimes knowing how to ask the question in a form that will elicit a) the correct answer, b) nothing but the answer, c) the up-to-date answer that doesn't relate to an obsolete device/package version.
If it is easier to refer people to a web site with the answer than to type it out, I will always post a precise URL to that page, rather than give a throwaway comment like "Why didn't you Google it?".
Reply to
NY
Thankyou, but I fear that there might be a bit of a chicken-and-egg situation there, having never switched an RPi on in the first place!
But thanks, I'll watch out for those !
Reply to
gareth evans
Actually, it's the older, extremely non-woke ones among us who expect someone to do at least minimal research by themselves first. Very often such research will turn up one or more threads in a forum or newsgroup which has already discussed the very same issue.
No. There are many millions of answers which cannot be found through Google, but even more which can, so it's worth a look first. Many of the latter answers often come from information exchanged in forums, which is why another of our pet hates are people who find the answer elsewhere to a question they have asked but don't post that answer on the forum. We are aware that we post not only for now but also for later Googlers.
The usual HDMI things, magnified by the 'domestic' tag.
E.g.: I use a TV with my workstation. Always after powering up, it is in standby and must have a button pushed on it to wake it up, even though it has an active connection on the other end of the cable.
Usually just the presence of termination resistors are enough to tell the other end it's OK to turn on, but there is often a particular order to turn things on the get the HDMI link up. At the very least, they need to be connected first.
--
Joe
Reply to
Joe
Here on usenet we have been telling people to RTFM since before the woke generation were even a glint in their gender non-specific parents eyes.
---druck
Reply to
druck
Am 14.06.2021 um 11:13 schrieb NY:
The solution is absolutely gorgeous. Simply click on it and the Pi is available in the net. What a brilliant computer system!
FW
Reply to
F. W.
Yes.
Beware of the TVs that claim to be "HD Ready". They often do not have a 1920x1080 display so you will never get a full screen picture without losing the borders.
Also some do not have audio on the hdmi.
There are probably many others too.
--
Nev 
It causes me a great deal of regret and remorse 
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Reply to
nev young
Reminds me of an issue raised during an engineering class discussion. Teacher posed a question re: three students given a problem re: cooking thermodynamics. One used his training to work out the solution using math and engineering formulas. Another did experimental tests and the third called his mom. Each of the them solved the problem. The teacher's question to the class was to consider which one was the most effective in this case.
Reply to
Yes
On Mon, 14 Jun 2021 10:10:21 +0100, "NY" declaimed the following:
On my Samsung TVs, if I don't use overscan, I get a large black border around the desktop.
I believe the TVs also have an option to fit the image to display area, but if the R-Pi is sending black borders, that is what is fit to display.
--
	Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN 
	wlfraed@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
Reply to
Dennis Lee Bieber

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