Keyboard/Mouse unresponsive after NOOBS install

I have a Pi ("B") and am trying to get it set-up for the 1st time. I've
downloaded the latest NOOBS and followed the instructions regarding
formatting the SD card and copying files (from a Windows box).
With the prepared SD card installed, the Pi boots properly and I use the
keyboard or the mouse to select an OS (Raspbian) which is then successfully
installed. However, after re-boot, Raspbian seems not to recognize the
keyboard or mouse.
Any hints? I've been thinking to try and install directly to the SD card ,
bypassing NOOBS. Is that likely to have any impact?
be seeing you ... Don
Reply to
Don
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could be a power supply issue. try unplugging the mouse or the keyboard. if that helps it probably is.
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umop apisdn
Reply to
Jasen Betts
I tried booting with the keyboard-only with the same result. :-( I'm also going to see if I can find a different keyboard in my "spares" collection. The one I'm using is a no-name Chinese "mini-keyboard" with a notebook-like layout.
I would have thought that a PS issue would have shown up while using NOOBS to start the install? I'll have to check the voltages to be sure.
P.S. Is there any way to pause or slow down the console display during Raspbian boot? There may be something in the USB discovery messages, but they scroll by too quickly for me to see. :-(
be seeing you ... Don
Reply to
Don
After the system has booted dmesg will show you what you missed .
Reply to
Gordon Levi
Thanks for the tip. -- Of course I still need to have a functioning keyboard to run dmesg. :-)
be seeing you .. Don
Reply to
Don
You could use a serial console instead.
Reply to
Rob Morley
You could press the Scroll Lock key on your... oh.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
(Top-posting because of being too lazy to reformat the earlier posting.)
Or, an ssh session would allow you to issue the command and view the results from another computer.
Now, setting the password might require a keyboard one time. Actually, you could take the SD card, use chroot to set the password on the SD card, and then use it to access the Pi via ssh.
HTH
Robert
Reply to
Robert Riches
Raspbian is "ssh" ready from the start, so it's possible to do a complete "headless" install of Raspbian - you just boot it and make sure it's on your LAN find it's IP address by querying your router/dhcp server, ssh in (user: pi, pass: raspberry) and you're off. You can then run sudo raspi-config to do stuff like resize the SD card, set locale, etc.
I have this as a handy script in ~/bin/findPi
#!/bin/bash # findPi: # Find all Pi's on the LAN
fping -a -r1 -g 192.168.254.0/24 &> /dev/null arp -n | fgrep " b8:27:eb"
Crude but effective.
However you can't do this with NOOBS - that needs screen/keyboard.
Gordon
Reply to
Gordon Henderson
I haven't tried noobs, but I was thinking maybe the normal boot was making greater demands on the graphics stuff, or the network chip or some other power hog.
um, you could try scroll-lock or ctrl-S/ctrl-Q
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umop apisdn
Reply to
Jasen Betts
um, did you read the subject line?
Reply to
Rob Morley
Why do that.....It would be helpful
Reply to
Baho Utot
Many thanks for that - works great (with the B+ which came yesterday I now have six RPis)
Reply to
Bob Martin
Resolved: It looks like it was a power issue. I replaced the USB cable between the wall wart and the Pi and everything began working. I'd heard stories of cheap USB cables, but hadn't expected one to be marginal enough that the Pi would run during install, but not when the actual OS was loaded. Perhaps Raspbian enables additional hardware (maybe the ethernet NIC?) that puts the power requirements "over the edge".
Thanks to everyone for the input.
be seeing you .. Don
Reply to
Don
I've seen lots of USB cables that simply don't meet the USB specification for the cable itself. If your cable was thin, lightweight, flexible and convenient to use, it probably didn't meet the specification. There wouldn't be enough copper in it; the resistance would be too high; the voltage drop would result in the RPi receiving a supply voltage that was out of specification.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Higton
The cable looked reasonable (physically, it's pretty much the same as the replacement I used), but who knows what's inside. If I feel adventurous, I may do some resistance measurements. What threw me off the trail was that the Pi worked absolutely fine throughout the NOOBS process and only acted up once the system was re-booted into Raspbian. Ah well ... live & learn, :-)
Reply to
Don

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