Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux

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Would you recommend or not recommend the FAT file system for embedded
linux products? Is it reliable enough for systems that must remain up
continuously with only outages caused by occasional loss of power?
Thank you,
Dave

Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux
Hallo Dave,

snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dave) schrieb in

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Which reasons do you have to choose FAT as replacement fpr ext2 or
better ext3? ext3 is a 24/7/365-filesystem with journaling and fast
recovery.

Regards, Kurt

--
PiN - Präsenz im Netz GITmbH
Kurt Harders
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Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux

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Hi,

IMO, the only reason to use a FAT file system for anything, is if you
have to have compatibility with Windows. i.e. if you are using
something like compact flash, and it has to be readable from a
standard Windows box. For anything else there are much better
file systems. EXT3, ReiserFS and XFS are all journaling file systems
that one can use.

Regards
   Anton Erasmus


Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux
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The compact flash _internals_ are not reliable at all when power
failiours while writing are possible. So considerations about the file
system used are vain.

-Michael

Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux
On Tue, 01 Jun 2004 08:53:29 +0200, Michael Schnell

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Yes,

But with a journaling file system you at least know whether the last
operation was completed successfully or not. This might or might not
be recoverable. With something like FAT you have no idea whether the
operation was a) not done at all, b)  was done halfway c) successfully
completed.
I might have given the impression in my previous post that FAT is a
good option for flash file systems. I meant that if one has a
removable media like a compact flash card, that has to be read from
a standard Windows box, then your only option might be flash even
though it is far from the best technical solution.
If one does not need Windows compatibility, then there are many much
better technical options, which is as easy if not easier to impliment
using linux.

Regards
  Anton Erasmus

Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux
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If the card itself fails, it will not be accessible at all. So there is
nothing to be recovered.

-Michael

Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Dave) writes:

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I recommend it if used properly.

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Yes, it is perfectly reliable under such conditions as  long  as  you
use it read-only.

Best regards,

Wolfgang Denk

--
Software Engineering:  Embedded and Realtime Systems,  Embedded Linux
Phone: (+49)-8142-4596-87  Fax: (+49)-8142-4596-88   Web: www.denx.de
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Re: Reliability of FAT file system for embedded Linux

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Outages caused by occasional loss of power are prevented using a
journalling file system like ext3 or reiserfs.

Basically, if you are not using the system under DOS/Windows as well
(which you tipically don't do in an embedded system) there is no reason
to use FAT. In that case I would not recommend FAT but ext3.

Freddy

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