Open source licensing model(s)

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How do the open source licencing models apply to a device, or complete
system, sold as a unit - e.g. a wireless access point based on linux?

What is being sold?  What is proprietory and what is open source in a
product like this?

Rgds,
Nicolas


Re: Open source licensing model(s)
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AFAIK, the usual opinion is that you need to do everything under GPL
that is statically linked to GPLed code (e.g. the Kernel). In embedded
projects this is relevant for drives you do for your propriety hardware.
  You can do all your user land programs with your own license if you
want to.

You need to grant your customers access to the source code of the GPLed
part of the software, as delivering a box is considered as distributing
the software contained.

Weather you "sell" something or "give it away" is not relevant. Both is
"distributing".

-Michael

Re: Open source licensing model(s)
Hello All,

Prehaps there is someone who can shed some light on this...I am not
familiar with the open source licensing models.

What happens when purpose-specific software is developed on an
opensource platform.  Does anything change when such is supplied as a
complete system, for instance as a wireless access point or similar
device?

Thanks in advance for your comments,

Nicolas Noakes


Re: Open source licensing model(s)
: Hello All,

: Prehaps there is someone who can shed some light on this...I am not
: familiar with the open source licensing models.

: What happens when purpose-specific software is developed on an
: opensource platform.  Does anything change when such is supplied as a
: complete system, for instance as a wireless access point or similar
: device?

You'd be better of googling and going to authoritative sites than
aksing here, Try going to   http://www.gnu.org/licenses.html
try searching at http://www.osdl.org for licenses, there is some stuff
there.

If your app. does not involve any GPL software, then the fact that it
runs on Linux is neither here nor there - you can release your software
under any terms you want. System calls to the kernel are not linking, and
libc and ulibc are, I believe, LGPL'd


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