Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Hi.

I am looking for a book in electronic or dead trees format with
guidelines for electronic design. That is, things such as maximum
allowed voltage on a capacitor related to nominal value, maximum power
on a resistor etc. I am working on a internal electronic design
quality assurance system and I need something to start from so I can
avoid reinventing the wheel.

TIA for any hint.

Elder.

Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.
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"The Art of Electronics", 2nd Ed. Horowitz and Hill.

A bit dated in the microprocessor section, but still
the best available.  You'll not regret buying it.


Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Some things you just get from experience too, particularly if you had to
repair older stuff that came back.

For example placing electrolytic caps beside a heat source such as a
regulator is a problem in a couple of years..... heat dries up cap,
capacitance goes down.... failure in some years.
Parts that produce plenty of heat are going to
expand/contract/expand/contract as equipment is turned on/of constantly....
I've seen loose connections where the solder joints twisting apart due to
metal fatigue.  Not so bad with thru/hole parts, but now with ceramic
parts, there is very little space for flexing. Just because a part is rated
for 1/4watt doesn't mean you should put 1/4watt thru it, because in a
couple years, possibly, the solder joint is open.

Some things you simply have to gain from experience. Pity to the engineers
who don't get their hands dirty once in a while and see what happens in a
production environment but have only staed in the lab... never seeing the
results of their work.  :-(
If you have access to manufacturing and repair, I highly suggest taking a
wander thru them every now and then, ask questions of the people doing the
work ;-)

Hope that helps.
Cheers!

Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Amen to that!



Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.
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Absolutely.



I fully agree. My own experience support this as we work as close as
possible with service and manufacturing people (though the plant is in
Manaus and I am in Sao Paulo :-) ) when designing. Not to mention
field research to check on problems which we learn a lot from.

Yet it's quite easy to forget some important things when writing a
guideline document.

Thanks and Regards.

Elder.

Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Perhaps:

"The Design analsis Handbook; A pracitcal Guide To Design Validation"
N Edward Walker
Newnes publication
ISBN 0-7506-9088-7

I found it to be a good hands on introduction book.

regards
rob



Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.
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That starts with the profession.
While electronic engineers tend to stay well below the rated
specifications, physicists tend to allow 10, 20% more than
specified. The later care less about the lifetime and have
it repaired by someone else.

Rene


Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.
Try "The Circuit Designer's Companion" by Tim Williams.

TomD
www.wizbangdesigns.com


Mad@Spammers wrote:
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Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Don't knock the dead tree medium. A short while ago I bought a book
dated 1854. Immediately accessible using current hardware/ software
setup. Try doing that with almost any electronic medium from 1974.
(punched tape anyone?)

Paul Burke


Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.
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Once you are familiar with the hex codings for the ascii char set,
it is fairly easy to read 7 + parity punched tape with the Mark I
Eyeball.  I haven't practiced this for some time, though.  Parity
errors tend to slip through.

Now, 7 track 200 BPI mag tapes ....

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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I don't think he was.  When I really need to comprehend a file, I print it.

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In school I programmed a Bendix G-15 tube computer to punch 5x5 dot
matrix characters (I even generated the character set) onto 5 channel
paper tape, then wrote a scroll to my girlfriend.  It would still be
readable if it was saved (not likely).

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I once saw a viewing device that looked similar to a liquid crystal
panel, except that the liquid had magnetic particles so that you could
view digital mag tape recordings!  It was basically a go/no-go kind of
indicator.  You could locate the inter-record gaps and tell if it was
recorded with 7 tracks or 9 tracks.  I doubt I could read the
characters, even at 200 bpi, although you could probably spot a string
of blanks.

Thad


Re: Electronic Design Guidelines.

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Wow! I wrote mine to punch 5x7's and wasted altogether too much
tape. I still have some of my old G-15 tapes - including an
Intercom 1000D program used to plot a heart on a Calcomp drum
plotter for my then-girlfriend.

Somewhere in storage I have a tape splicer and a bunch of mylar
splices ( just in case the technology makes a comeback :-)

BTW, I (still) type (s)c7q89vz faster than any other character
sequence.
--
Morris Dovey
West Des Moines, Iowa USA
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