ARM about to be sold

ARM is about to be sold to a Japanese company:

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As a Brit, it saddens me to see a British success story sold into foreign hands, but my real concern is about what the future might bring several years down the road.

Questions currently going through my mind include whether ARM will still be able to perform R&D at their current rate and whether ARM's engineers will be outsourced in the future and replaced with lower quality staff.

I know the new owners are promising a major new resource investment but promises and eventual reality are not always the same thing if the investment ends up being badly mismanaged. I've got no direct reason to suspect it will be mismanaged, but I have some general unease about possible issues around the cultural compatibility of ARM with a foreign investor.

Simon.

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Simon Clubley, clubley@remove_me.eisner.decus.org-Earth.UFP 
Microsoft: Bringing you 1980s technology to a 21st century world
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Simon Clubley
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I read they expect to double the UK workforce, so not all bad.

I doubt it. Would you pay billions for a working company and then mess it up? Anyone who can raise billions is not stupid.

What makes you think they will get into the management at all rather than just taking the profits and saying "thank you"?

I think ARM is too big a force for an owner to mess up. The customers are huge and have a lot of throw weight.

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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

There is some informative discussion here, though it's a day old by now:

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Reply to
Paul Rubin

Oh, for a world in which that statement were true.

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Rob Gaddi, Highland Technology -- www.highlandtechnology.com
 
Email address domain is currently out of order.  See above to fix.
Reply to
Rob Gaddi

Time Warner anyone :-)

tim

Reply to
tim...

Ask Microsoft. How much did they pay for Nokia and Skype? Lets see what happens with LinkedIn!

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Mike Perkins 
Video Solutions Ltd 
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Reply to
Mike Perkins

Intelligence will not necessarily save them when market forces are at work. In a contest between logic and money always bet on the money.

This is what I would have said about DEC some decades ago!

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Nils M Holm  < n m h @ t 3 x . o r g >  www.t3x.org
Reply to
Nils M Holm

There is no such contest.

DEC was selling future dinosaurs. They simply didn't adapt to the times. ARM *is* the future which Intel needs to adapt to.

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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

History disagrees with you. Sometimes these things work out splendidly, sometimes they work horribly. Usually the people who make the initial deal make out like bandits ('cuz they're not stupid), but often the companies involved go down the tubes, leaving stockholders holding an empty bag.

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Tim Wescott 
Wescott Design Services 
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Reply to
Tim Wescott

Your logic is very poor. History says things can go bad, but that is no contradiction to what I said.

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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

Your logic is not very good either though. Anybody who can make billions is not stupid - true. Not being stupid is by far not what it takes to do what ARM did so far though. It takes some extra talent.

You don't know whether the guy with the billions has it.

I expect things will slowly fall into their places, ARM 32 will stay in small MCU-s (it is just not fit for use in large ones as they use it), ARM 64 may or may not survive, time will tell (I don't know enough about it to make predictions).

Dimiter

Reply to
Dimiter_Popoff

Current CEO was in Pilkington Glass when it was sold. Great engineering making a profitable product. Sold to a Japanese company. CEO did not fit with the Japanese model. Now he is doing it again.

Knighthood anyone?

Reply to
Bill Davy

64 bit ARM designs are already rocking the world both in mobile apps and desktop.
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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

Obviously I know that much, it just is not enough to base a prediction on it. I had a brief glance at the architecture 2-3 years ago and it looked OK, but I did not try to get to the details. At least this one has enough registers to be able to maintain a full pipeline (as far as I saw).

Dimiter

Reply to
Dimiter_Popoff

There's little reporting on the phenomenon, but acquisitions in the billions (1xE09) range are routinely bollixed up.

My experience is that the people who can raise billions are not the sharpest tools in the shed. It's not called "dumb money" for nothing.

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Les Cargill
Reply to
Les Cargill

Just no. Making billions doesn't imply any sort of intelligence nor talent at all.

But this too. Smart people do stupid things.

I'm behind as well, but ARM32 can support quite a bit of RAM and FLASH.

I dunno - is a Coretex A8 on a Beaglebone a large or small? Seems large to me. Maybe medium?

It may not.

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Les Cargill
Reply to
Les Cargill

Are you talking about winning the lottery? Otherwise making billions of dollars pretty much does require *some* sort of talent or everyone would be doing it, no?

But less often than stupid people.

In the long run nothing survives including us.

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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

(snip)

Looks like you are not into transhumanism?

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Gene

Reply to
Evgeny Filatov

Allow me to modify my previous statement...

In the long run nothing survives including us^H^H transhumanism.

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Rick C
Reply to
rickman

Hi there Gene,

even so he is right I guess, nothing lasts forever :-).

But of course some things outlive others, some people outlive others....

I think I know how to emulate myself on a sufficiently large machine running DPS - I only wish I knew where to start with the _read_ part of the copying... :D .

Dimiter

------------------------------------------------------ Dimiter Popoff, TGI

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Reply to
Dimiter_Popoff

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