What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?

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They have doubled their prices and the lead times are 18 weeks.

Yet, others are making them OK.

Are Atmel trying to get out of the business?
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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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They got rid of their fabs, and are now having to join the queue at
TSMC or wherever they get their chips made. They are probably having
to pay a lot more for them, because of demand for the manufacturing
facilities. Microchip have their own fabs, and seem able to keep up
with demand.

Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?




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Not a good reason to design-in an Atmel processor then... I have one
running in production volumes but need to update it, and another was
going to go in to replace a Hitachi uC. We were going to use the
ATmega 128L.

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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?



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I'd use the ATmega1281 as the ATmega128 is a bit old hat now (plus the
ATmega1281 can run a little faster at 3.3V as it has a voltage vs. speed
rating which the ATmega128 doesn't). If you want something a little smaller
the ATtiny48 and ATtiny88 are nice chips. I'm quite a fan of the AVRs
personally...

Mark.



Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


Leon skrev:
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While at least some memory chips are outsourced, the AVRs are still
manufactured inside Atmel.

I get leadtime guides from distributors and many semiconductor
companies have 20+ weeks leadtime right now.

Talked to one large customer who got 42 weeks lead time for mobile DDRs.

When lead times go up, some customers tend to order components
from several suppliers, so apparent demand is higher than real demand,
so anything in stock is swallowed up immediately.

If there is no stock, then it normally takes 16 weeks to
produce new things for any semiconductor manufacturer.

Quite often, the fab capacity is not the problem, but testing is.
If you can't buy new testers, then capacity cannot increase.
Companies doing test equipment cant deliver, because they
have long lead times on components. Hmmm...

Best Regards
Ulf Samuelsson

Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Different manufacturers have different levels of outsourcing, from
all processes are outsourced (100% outsourced), to all in house.

Sometimes some of the processes are outsourced because the majority
of their machinery is now for smaller geometry, and the wafers only
may be outsourced for some products to be made somewhere that has the
larger geometry proceses.

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....


Reminds me of an ASIC company whose customer in purchasing wanted to
bring forward the next 6 months of production to that week, and asked
"can't you just put more people on it?". At the time that would have been
impossible even with stocks of wafers, as this was an avionics ASIC.

The testing procedure for this avionics ASIC was

    Wafer test electronically room temperature
    Package good parts
    Package test electronically room temperature

    Place large batch in oven and power all devices with clocks
    attached, and leave all parts running for a week at 125 deg C
    
    After a week slowly drop temperature to then
       test electronically at room temperature
       lower temperature to -55 deg C electronically test

    Parts needed a second packaging process and then retest
     at room temperature.

    All with full serial number of device and batch testing
    logged.

If new wafers are needed you can add 12 weeks in front of that.

Environmental chambers and testing for full temperature range
is a long job and about every 12 to 18 months you have to strip
down and replace ALL the internal wiring, connectors and boards.

Imagine the setups required for testing upto 120 off 100 pin
devices in enviromental chambers and how many you require.

Designing the PCBs is also fun...

--
Paul Carpenter          | snipped-for-privacy@pcserviceselectronics.co.uk
<http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/ PC Services
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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Some ARM cored micros are on 40 week lead times, good thing atmel
manafacture the AVRs themselves.  For related see here:
http://www.electronicsweekly.com/blogs/david-manners-semiconductor-blog/201 =
0/03/when-youve-got-your-customer-b.html


Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?



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At one point Microchip was trying to buy Atmel. What ever happened to that?



Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Is this limited to EEPROM/Memory only or uCPU as well?

Definitely worth considering getting out of AVR.
Do NPX ARM come with on-chip FLASH?

M



Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


On Fri, 26 Mar 2010 14:52:33 +0100

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If you're asking about the Cortex M3/M0 ones that they're price
targeting to go head to head with the 8-bitters, then yes.  Though they
only have flash, they don't have the few bytes of EEPROM that the AVRs
threw in.

--
Rob Gaddi, Highland Technology
Email address is currently out of order

Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?




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I simply cannot believe Atmel are going to drop all the AVR users in
the sh*t.

I've been in electronics design and manufacturing since the mid 1970s
and have seen these "crises" so many times.

At one time we used to buy a 74LS245 for 20 pence and months later
they were 2.50 - a 12x rise.

How did this happen? Did the whole world suddenly want a 74LS245?

No.

What happened is that there was an over-supply of 74LS (following,
guess what, a previous price bump) and the prices plummetted. So the
distis, being cynical bastards, sent out their sales reps to spread
stories of "74LS going on allocation".

"Allocation" is the word every buyer dreads because it means you don't
get a lead time quoted, so basically you have to massively over-order,
with several distis at the same time.

The stock of course arrives, some months later, and then you are
over-stocked for a few years ;)

And the cycle repeats but the cynical bastard salesmen collected their
commissions, left those companies, and are now marketing managers ;)
So they never face the music.

Currently, there is a lot of crap being spread around about Allocation
yet again, and sure enough people are starting to buy into it, and
lead times are growing.

However, interestingly, we are likely to end up in a situation where
our main products will be in two versions, one using the Hitachi
H8/323 and the other using an Atmega128 (or whatever), but externally
they will be exactly identical functionally. I have 5-10 year stock of
the H8 in a safe, and will keep a similar stock of the ATmega.

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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Was that back when supposedly the encapsulation epoxy plant burned
down? Maybe that was different 'crisis'. lol!

Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?



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I remember RAM becoming more expensive after each major earthquake
in Asia some years ago.

M



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I recall that !!

Yeah, very likely.

A Jap earthquake was another good one for lead times. The distis jump
on anything.

Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?



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Yes, all of them have 128 bit wide flash that allows zero waitstate
execution at the maximum CPU clock.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Not bad, I ordered a couple books on ARM off Amazon, may get into it finally.
From what I see they are same price as AVR mega, low power and much faster.
And NXP is very generous with samples.

M



Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?



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The books on ARM may be too generic. Most of the things you need to
know are in the user manual and the datasheet. NXP's Cortex based
LPC1000 series need no assembly at all to get running. Even interrupt
routines do not need special care.

--
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
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Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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The datasheet I've seen for one of the NXP ARM did not seem as elaborate as
Atmel usually supplies. Probably need general family
user manual to cover gray areas.

M



Re: What is happening to Atmel EEPROMs?


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Atmel usually supplies. Probably need general family
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The User Manual is essential, the data sheet only has the pinouts and
the electrical characteristics.

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