OT book review

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View

https://www.dropbox.com/s/lgdhhwlqggm7y4y/Book-Review.jpg?raw=1




Re: OT book review
On 9/27/2020 7:30 PM, John Larkin wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Brideshead Revisited is what you would give an overeager teenage boy at  
the library when he says he wants an "adult novel."

Re: OT book review
On Sunday, September 27, 2020 at 8:29:16 PM UTC-4, bitrex wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I haven't read it, why not "Portnoy's Complaint" ?

I recently reread "Double Star" by RAH.  It's a wonderful  
'Shakespearean' story.  And tightly written... in my top ten  
at the moment.  

George H.  


Re: OT book review
On 9/27/2020 9:18 PM, George Herold wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I have traumatic childhood memories of expecting "Great Railway Journeys  
of the World" to be showing on PBS but mixing up the days or something  
and finding out the made-for-TV version of Brideshead was coming on at 9  
pm, instead. Unnnngggh.

If you want to bore any red-blooded American boy to tears give him a  
story about effete English aristocracy fopping about in their manor-homes.

Re: OT book review
bitrex wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Railway Journeys? Never tried it, but I didn't like Sesame Street  
either. I called BS when it claimed we were running out of clean water.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's a shame you were too young to watch Danger UXB when it was on  
Masterpiece Theatre long before Downton Abbey.

In each episode the Germans develop a new fuse and the British figure  
out how to disarm it.

It was on youtube a couple of years ago. Maybe it's still there.

I can't understand why DA became so popular when so many other things on  
PBS were ignored by the masses.




Re: OT book review
On Mon, 28 Sep 2020 10:54:29 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Most people are people-people. They care most about social
interaction, emotions, loving and hating, tribalism, belonging or not.
Like most of the posters here.

A good engineer deliberately puts that stuff aside so he can make
proper judgements about things.

DA is mostly about people, and UBX is mostly about bombs.

A lot of red-blooded American boys (including this one) went through a
Sherlock Holmes phase as teenagers. Sherlock would have made a good
engineer.

I tried to read Brideshead a couple of months ago. Made it about 20%
through. Boring. Henry James, ditto.

PG Wodehouse is brilliant.  



--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT book review
snipped-for-privacy@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Upstairs Downstairs (the original) was similar to DA but most didn't  
know it existed. I Claudius was also about people, and was also ignored,  
so I don't understand why the masses suddenly discovered PBS when DA  
started.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

You weren't a teenager any more when Jeremy Brett played Holmes but I  
hope you saw that series. The Sherlock Holmes Society in London agreed  
with me that Brett was the best ever.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I could never have made it to 20%.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I never even discovered him until the Jeeves and Wooster series. That's  
another example. It should have been more popular that Cheers or  
Seinfeld.




Re: OT book review
On Mon, 28 Sep 2020 11:40:26 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I find the J+W series to be sort of slapstick. The Pig books are
great. A Damsel in Distress is maybe the best-written book in the
English language. The last chapter is the best, and it's a short phone
call.

As a socially-impaired (somewhat austistic, according to my wife)
engineer, I like books with strong discriptions of the physical
surroundings, things I can visualize. PG was good at that. So was Jane
Austen. A Room with a View is good that way.

Nero Wolfe is very Sherlock-y and very visual. We have the cookbook
too. The excellent Timothy Bottoms series is on Youtube.



--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

Science teaches us to doubt.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT book review
snipped-for-privacy@highlandsniptechnology.com wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

It is a lot of slapstick, but the most witty slapstick ever made. Like  
the scene where the Brown Shirt bully chases Wooster.

I'll get A Damsel in Distress. I assume it's ok to start with that one.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Speaking of the physical world, I was just reading the wikipedia article  
on Feynman. He was not exposed to religion as a Jewish kid, but later he  
visited a Jewish academic society and looked at the Talmud for the first  
time. He was impressed by the tradition of question and comment, but  
disappointed that none of the rabbis had any curiosity to ask questions  
about the physical world. Rabbis must be people persons.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

You mean Timothy Hutton.  Maury Chaykin was one of those character  
actors who could out-act any movie star.




Re: OT book review
On Mon, 28 Sep 2020 14:45:47 -0400, "Tom Del Rosso"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Wodehouse tended to tell the same story many times, and he knew it.
Damsel is just the best.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Right, Hutton. Another thing that's fun about that series is that they
had an acting troupe and people played different roles in different
episodes. A guy would be a thug in one and an FBI agent in the next.


Re: OT book review
On 9/28/2020 10:54 AM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Some of them like most things are available on YT, Railway Journeys was  
a much more interesting show for 8 year old me that's for sure:

<https://youtu.be/LRwtABg21YA

Yeah say what you want about Seasame Street but the 1980s were the  
Golden Age of educational programming/public television for children I  
think. No corporate sponsors to please so when the actor who played the  
kindly old man who ran the Sesame Street Store, "Mr. Hooper" passed away  
in reality they didn't just write him out or find a replacement, the  
story is just what is, Mr. Hooper died (often a novel concept to 3 and 4  
year olds), and Big Bird or whoever plays the audience-insertion is made  
to understand by the human characters that sometimes people go away, and  
they don't come back.

That is to say they refused to insult the intelligence of the audience  
even though the audience was mostly 4 year olds.

Over on 3-2-1 Contact this was considered age-appropriate material for  
8-9 year olds, a time trip 1 billion years into the future:

<https://youtu.be/WppJEf3ZtFU

Again they figured that age group was mature enough for it

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah the British royalty and aristocracy and all that seems pretty  
popular subject among many Americans I can't say I understand it much  
either.

And there's the type of leftist who lives in a million-dollar spread in  
San Fran and loves "the classics" so much they put 'em all on their  
stairs and names their first daughter like Aurelia Skye Emily Dickinson  
Mackenzie-Worthington or something and the type that tends to roll their  
eyes at that ah, "lifestyle"


Re: OT book review
bitrex wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Oh, it had Michael Wood. He made In search of the Trojan War. I wouldn't  
have watched either when I was 8 though.

He made the Trojan War series when it was still not known if it really  
happened. He started the series not believing it, but changed his mind  
after seeing the evidence. After that every documentary that mentioned  
it assumed it was reality, so it seemed as though Wood discovered it or  
at least was the first to present it as fact.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Mr Hooper was the one who claimed we were running out of clean water,  
while washing dishes in a basin so he could re-use the water. (Why a  
store keeper would need to wash dishes in front of his store didn't make  
sense either.)

I was 5 when I called BS on that. "Don't they know there's a water  
cycle?"  That was the same year my grandfather died too.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Good animation.

I watched Nova since it started in 1973. Two years later a dimwitted  
teacher suggested that I should watch The Big Blue Marble because she  
hadn't noticed that I wa beyond kids' science shows.

Nova was college material back then. Now it's high school. I call it  
Nova Dumbed Down.

In high school Mr Crivelli explained antigens, and it was not only  
simplified, but flat wrong, with the cause and effect sequence reversed!  
I didn't want to embarass him so I waited until after class to say, "but  
I thought antigens work this way..." He said, "you're right but we  
simplify it for high school." Today's Nova wouldn't offer the complete  
exposition like they did back then.




Re: OT book review
On Monday, September 28, 2020 at 7:46:44 PM UTC-4, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Hmm, Yeah I see the same thing. (And why can't someone make  
nature documentaries as well as David Attenborough?  We have  
beautiful photography but no story. Or worse some made up story.)

Part of it is 'science as entertainment for the masses'.  
So Sci Am changes from what it was ~1980 and before... to what  
it is today.  

I think there is another part, (of why nova is dumber) that reflects  
how science is kinda broken.  You risk much (as a scientist) if you  
step outside the excepted dogma of your field. So we on the outside  
will not hear any controversy... or you have to dig more.  

Hey if nova stinks (I still watch it.) Do you know any good science
videos/ podcasts?  

I offer this, "The roots of evolutionary dentistry"  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYpPu-NrYSI&list=PLjQ2gC-5yHEtxcqAW_ABA9ILm-OzugEEy

(~2 hr video.)    
(I mostly just listen while doing other work.)
  
George H.    
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT book review
On 2020-09-29 12:52, George Herold wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Backreaction is OK, though I only look at the transcripts.

To see good popular science writing, nearly anything in SciAm during the  
Gerard Piel era (post WW2 up do 1989) is applicable.  The mag was sold  
off in the mid-80s and Piel was replaced as publisher in the late '80s.  
After awhile, the new people started chasing the audience of Omni  
Magazine.  SciAm and Discover squeezed Omni out of business from above  
and below, but then SciAm became Omni, and now seems to have become  
Discover. :(

I learned a lot of science and engineering from SciAm back in the day.  
I own every issue published in my lifetime up to December 1989.  I  
subscribed up to about 1994, but the quality never came back out of the  
tank, so I pitched the last five years' worth when I cancelled my  
subscription.  A great pity.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT book review
On Tuesday, September 29, 2020 at 5:19:40 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Yeah, More guest postings would be nice.  After several years and  
her book I feel I mostly understand Sabine's physics point of view.  

I like triton station by Stacy McGaugh (sp) if you are  
mond curious*.  

The Lex Fridman podcast is good.. but no transcript.  

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Yeah I have a similar story.. but my subscription started  
sometime in the mid 70's.  And I placed my collection at  
the curb years ago.  

George H.  

*I read D. Merrit's MOND book.  
https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/philosophical-approach-to-mond/9E770E2F021E79EE639C9A750143C589

I'd give it a B.  For me not much new, since I've been reading  
triton station for years.  And a bit tedious in spots.  
(Various Popperian definitions of science.)  
What I hadn't realized was that cosmologists had to  
tweak (factor of 2) the baryon density to get lamda-CDM  
to fit the CMB anisotropity data.  And this has led to the  
current day 'missing baryons problem' and 'lithium problem'.
  

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT book review
On 9/28/2020 10:54 AM, Tom Del Rosso wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Maybe they thought the conservative audience would be interested in  
conservation a common misunderstanding, lol. I expect it's hard to write  
a show aimed at 4 y/os and conservatives in the third or fourth decade  
of life and manage to please everyone you know!!

Re: OT book review
On Monday, September 28, 2020 at 11:18:58 AM UTC+10, George Herold wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

And a trifle prophetic, in that Reagan was an actor posing as a president - though he did get elected in (more or less) his own right.

Trump is the opposite - somebody who can't actually play the role, despite all the coaching he gets.

--  
Bill Sloman, Sydney

Site Timeline