I have a patent!

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What's weird is that, until today when I discovered it by accident, I never knew it existed.

John

Reply to
John Larkin
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It took 5 years from its filing to being issued? That's a bit long, no? Can you imagine how old Edison would have been if his patents took that long?

Bob

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Reply to
BobW

What's even weirder is that I have had Usenet postings I made years and years ago show up as being cited by Patent Examiners!

I suspect that examiner spent too much time at work reading Usenet and had to justify this to his bosses by citing at least a couple Usenet posts :-).

Tim.

Reply to
Tim Shoppa

I suppose anything posted here could be cited as public disclosure and prior art, disallowing a patent. And google will turn it up.

I'm sometimes surprised at how often s.e.d. posts turn up in google searches. There are a number of web sites that repost our stuff - don't know why - and increase the indexing.

John

Reply to
John Larkin

I have a couple like that, where I assisted in a project design, and the principal designer in the company filed a patent app and listed me as co-inventor... like the Xtreme Spectrum stuff.

...Jim Thompson

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| James E.Thompson, P.E.                           |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Reply to
Jim Thompson

UHV, polyamide, hmmm... Is Rogers' DUROID UHV compatible? I could zap you a chunk of .1" double-sided RT/5870.

James

Reply to
James Arthur

The delay-line anodes used Kynar as the insulator, and work in hard UHV. We used a kynar film that comes with a real thin teflon layer; photoetch the delay line sheets, stick the kynar/teflon between, heat and press, and it all sticks together.

I got a private email, viz

"I used Rogers R3010. Works in UHV down to your range. Normal FR4 does not work."

R3010 is PTFE (more like leather than a "board") and dielectric constant of 10! Yikes. But R3003 is only e=3.

John

Reply to
John Larkin

RT/5870 is PTFE/glass, er= 2.3. I got a few panels at a swapmeet. Leathery, like you say.

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I also have some ceramic substrate PCB stuff, but you'd need lasers to drill it.

Cheers, James

Reply to
James Arthur

Oh, here--this says it's low out-gassing:

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James

Reply to
James Arthur

"John Larkin" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...

Congratulations.

Now what part did you contribute?

Cheers

Reply to
Martin Riddle

More important, whats the license fee ?

don

Reply to
don

Tye and I sort of brainstormed it together. He's a mechanical engineer, so I had to explain the electrical stuff to him. I suggested the layout and photo-etching; he came up with the UHV-compatible kapton/teflon lamination and using a laser to blast out the circle.

I developed some cute algorithms for computing the x-y-t of a particle hit at high rates, namely when hits start to overlap. That's not part of the patent.

I don't think this has been used commercially. It's sort of obscure.

But I have a patent! I've always wanted one. I'm famous now, or immortal, or something.

John

Reply to
John Larkin

Definitely inspiring.

I plan to file for several patents myself in few months under the Provisional Patent program.

For those who have not been watching, on June 8, 1995, the USPTO essentially converted their $10.00US "At Least Tell Us What You Are Thinking About And We'll Hold It For Two Years " program into a "Stake Your Claim Now For $110" program:

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For $110US, you file provisional patent application, which lasts for

12 months, during which you get to claim "Patent Pending" status and sell your idea publically. Before 12-months expires, you have the choice of filing a non-provisional patent application, or converting the provisional application. The difference between filing for non- prov and prov conversion is time: the conversion starts the 20-year clock at date of filing of prov, where as filing for non-prov gives you 20 years plus however much time you waited during those 12 months. Some people purposely wait about 2-weeks just before 12-month period expires, hoping to get as close to the max 21 years as possible, which is not recommended, because something could happen, like being locked up for disorderly conduct, and if you've been selling your wares during that period, you will lose the legal entitlement of the prov application, and effectively be exposed.

This means is that, if you have 20 killer ideas, and you are certain that they are unique and that one of them will "put you over the top", so to speak, you might file 20 prov applications for $2200, claim Patent Pending status on all of them, and wait to see which brings in most revenue, then file non-prov app(s) against those.

Here is fee schedule:

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Edison never had it so easy. ;)

-Le Chaud Lapin-

Reply to
Le Chaud Lapin

Perhaps Gribb, Tye Travis, or John Joseph added your name due to your contributions?

Reply to
Robert Baer

A caution (from the 1rst page linked above):

Beware that an applicant whose invention is "in use" or "on sale" (see 35 U.S.C. §102(b)) in the United States during the 12 month provisional-application pendency period may lose [...] the right to ever patent the invention (see 35 U.S.C. §102(b)).

Cheers, James Arthur

Reply to
James Arthur

Did you once help out a guy named Gribb?

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Reply to
Bob Larter

Indeed. ;^) Congratulations!

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Reply to
Bob Larter

They have that here in Australia too, but it's only about $70-$80 for 12 months. So you get 12 months to get your idea to market and see if it's worth shelling out the $$$$ for the full (usually useless) patent.

Dave.

Reply to
David L. Jones

Another Aussie! G'day Dave. ;^)

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Reply to
Bob Larter

From what I understand, without the sort of deep pockets that hardly even notice the cost of a "full" patent, anything that is not useless is nearly not worth patenting. Your patent protection extends just about exactly as far as your legal department makes it, and if you don't have a legal department, that's not very far.

Contraiwise, with an adequate legal department, and sloppy examining (no reference at all to people skilled in the art), you can patent such things as the published quicksort algorithm, and despite it being published years before "software patents" got on the scene, manage to tie that up in court, rather than being thrown out on your ear and forced to pay the other side's legal bill, as should be the case.

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Reply to
Ecnerwal

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