any of you guys remember this?

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I built that years ago and my father got more use out of it with his
guitar playing than I did.

  I later on made a power supply so that it could be operated from my
van. It required me to install a double battery system with a heavy
alternator. I also modified the outputs to use different power
transistors with a add on heat sink that had liquid cooling in it.

   I still have the unit sitting in the corner packed up, have  no idea
if it still works :)

Jamie




Re: any of you guys remember this?

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   I'm surprised that it ever worked.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
On Mon, 28 Nov 2011 13:01:11 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

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That's so-o-o-o _modern_.  My first build was an UltraLinear with
Dynaco (?) transformer and 6L6's.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Wimpy stuff. I built mine with a bucket load of color TV flyback driver
tubes, direct mains rectification and _no_ output transformer. A few
twangs on the E-guitar and plaster pieces came off the ceiling.

But I learned two lessons: High voltage DC at several amps is dangerous,
threw me back against a cabinet and my shoulder put a crack in its door
upon impact. Secondly, I will never ever attempt to rewind a speaker
coil anymore, never no more.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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I BET YOU ROCKED !!!!



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It sure impressed the heck out of the guys but I could not play the
guitar myself. Or any instrument for that matter. Still can't.

If you cranked it up too high, strum the strings .. THWOK .. circuit
breaker popped. And that was on a 230V 16amp circuit.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

Re: any of you guys remember this?

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   He's an amateur.  WLW had a plate modulate 500 kW AM transmitter at
700 KHz. That required 250 KW of audio for modulation. The transmitter
and cooling drew over 1 MW, and needed a large cooling pond for the
water used as a coolant. Lights dimmed around Cincinatti, when the plate
power was turned on, and the electric company hd to build special power
lines to the transmitter site in Mason, Ohio.  It could be picked up in
Europe.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
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And then the license was revoked and they had to throttle power back
down. My license wasn't revoked :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

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   Sigh.  It was an experimental license that lapsed, after years of
commercial testing & use.  Powel Crosley was a defense contractor, and
had lots of friends in Washington DC.  A lot of other stations wanted to
go to 500 KW, or higher.  The idea was to provide AM radio to areas that
didn't have or couldn't support a local station.  Large areas of the
country still had no radio reception at all, unlike today.  WLW was the
only US AM  BCB station that was allowed to actually build and test the
only 'Superpower AM' station.  And they never tripped a breaker.

   Considering that it operated in the '30s, it used more power than
some small towns at that time.

   There is some information on the WLW site, and Jim Hawkins site has
more.  They ran their original 50 KW transmitter for Y2K, instead of one
of the newer transmitters that are normally used.  OTOH, they used new
parts, and the three companies involved built a well designed, state of
the art facility.  There were no sweep tubes at that time, so you
wouldn't have built anything from scrap, anyway.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?

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I built mine in 1955.  Were you even born yet ?:-)

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In the mid '70's I was tutoring Algebra to a neighbor kid and offered
a bribe, get an "A" and we'll build a guitar amplifier.  He got the
"A" and I built a 400W (true RMS rated) solid state amplifier.
Transformer power supply... it took two people to carry it.

His father was president of Anthony Pools... so I also ended up with a
swimming pool for half price ;-)
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Not even conceived :-)


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I bet that has lit up many sessions for his band. 400W sustained is
pretty good.


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You should have gone into politics. That's how things work there, favors
against favors :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com /

Re: any of you guys remember this?

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Yep.  I was glad when they moved away to Arlington, VA.  He would
practice in their carport... you could hear it for miles :-(

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When the depression hits, that's the way _all_ business will be done.
No skill or trade, you die... gonna be really hard on unskilled
liberals.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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It must have been like a 2000 VA transformer, right?  What did something
like that cost back then?  Unfortunately for most DIYers it's nowadays
probably cheaper to buy a 400 watt Class D amp off the shelf than buy
iron for a class AB linear amp at that power level.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
On Mon, 28 Nov 2011 20:56:37 -0500, Bitrex

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I really don't remember now.  I certainly wasn't well-to-do back then,
so it couldn't have been very much.  I vaguely remember using two
transformers, one for the plus supply and one for the minus.  I also
ran fans on the heat sinks ;-)
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Re: any of you guys remember this?

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   I think that it was published in Popular Electronics, to sell kits.


--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
On Tue, 29 Nov 2011 05:01:19 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

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That could be.  Like most everything I've done, I didn't realize they
would become valuable antiques (like me :-), so I tossed them in favor
of "modern"... and didn't even take pictures :-(
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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  You are smart enough to know that you can't keep everything.  Where
would you keep it, if you did? :)

--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
On Tue, 29 Nov 2011 10:25:29 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

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While I was in NY for three months my wife decided to "neaten up" my
office.  I'm just now getting back to my "indexed mess" so I can find
everything ;-)
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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idea
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   NEVER leave your wife alone with your toys!!!

--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense.

Re: any of you guys remember this?
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A friend of mine was one of the founders and I worked at G.A.S. on and
off from its beginning to its end. I built the first Ampzilla prototype
kit to see if the parts and assembly manual were correct. They were and
that amplifier probably still works.

The philosophy of the lead designers (Bongiorno and Hefley) was to
create as-near-as-possible perfect voltage source amplifiers. Their
biggest amp, Godzilla, would do 1KW into 2 ohms per channel. It really
was a beast.

http://www.davidsaudio.com/html/gas_line.html


When G.A.S. was still selling kits, we received two driver boards back
for repair that someone had built. Whoever built them had installed all
of the resistors and capacitors by inserting the parts only far enough
to be able to solder the leads. All of the parts were sticking off the
board and high up in the air. It was hilarious! We sent him a pair
tested production boards and kept his to show off.

It was a great company - while it lasted.

Bob

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