Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?

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I've been using the Airspy ADS-B decoder on a model 2B with an early OS  
(Jessie?) for some time, without problems.  The software is described here:

https://airspy.com/quickstart/
   => Using the ADSB decoder in embedded ARM boards

As an experiment, I tried a new SD card with the latest Buster OS, but  
the program no longer works correctly.  The program does run, but  
doesn't function - i.e. it doesn't produce decodes of aircraft.  Perhaps  
it cannot connect to the USB device, but it doesn't issue any error  
message (I know!).

Are there any things I should set in Buster to allow an Airspy device to  
work?  Any issues with e.g. the RTL-SDR sticks (this is a different  
device).  Any issues with Buster on a model 2B?

I have asked the developer but he's currently busy with a major new  
product launch.  I'm not quite how to debug this!

--  
Thanks,
David
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Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Thu, 08 Aug 2019 06:06:13 +0100, David Taylor wrote:

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Obvious question: is there anything relevant in the logs?

Related point: Buster seems to make rather more use of logging than  
Stretch and predecessors, so you might want to see if the logrotate and  
logwatch packages are installed: I did an in-situ upgrade from Stretch to  
Buster which did not install them, so I added them manually. Then again  
I'm used to having these packages installed on my bigger Fedora boxes and  
I have also modified /etc/aliases so root's mail for every host on my LAN  
gets redirected to my normal login on the laptop that I usually work  
from.  


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 08/08/2019 09:44, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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Martin,

Thanks for that suggestion.  dmesg showed just the existence of the USB  
device, and that looked correct.  That's really the only log inspection  
command I've used.  Should I be looking elsewhere?

--  
Cheers,
David
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Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Fri, 09 Aug 2019 07:55:15 +0100, David Taylor wrote:

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I've found it useful to have tail running on the messages log in a  
terminal window if I'm having trouble accessing a USB device. This has  
helped a lot when trouble-shooting USB serial adapters and also when  
discovering and reporting a USB mass-storage bug which prevented my  
laptop from seeing both the built-in memory and an SD-card in a Medion  
S.3747 PNA when it was connected to the laptop via USB.

Just run "sudo tail -f /var/log/messages" in the terminal window. Kill  
tail with Ctrl-C when you've finished using it.


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 09/08/2019 12:08, Martin Gregorie wrote:
[]
 > I've found it useful to have tail running on the messages log in a
 > terminal window if I'm having trouble accessing a USB device. This has
 > helped a lot when trouble-shooting USB serial adapters and also when
 > discovering and reporting a USB mass-storage bug which prevented my
 > laptop from seeing both the built-in memory and an SD-card in a Medion
 > S.3747 PNA when it was connected to the laptop via USB.
 >
 > Just run "sudo tail -f /var/log/messages" in the terminal window. Kill
 > tail with Ctrl-C when you've finished using it.

Thanks for that suggestion!  I ran that, and tried starting the program,
but no new messages appeared.  In fact, the time of the last message was
midnight "today".  But that tip will be also useful for the future.


--  
Cheers,
David
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Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Fri, 09 Aug 2019 15:59:50 +0100, David Taylor wrote:

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Its worthwhile grepping /var/log/* - providing that you know a program  
name and/or log-format timestamp to search on - if there's nothing in  
messages.


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 09/08/2019 16:30, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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Yes, the name is known.  I just tried that after a successful start, but  
if there were any earlier error messages (due to lack of permission)  
they weren't present.  Oh, well.  But next time.....
--  
Cheers,
David
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Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Fri, 9 Aug 2019 11:08:45 -0000 (UTC)

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    There's a lot to be said for tail -F - which tracks when the log
file cycles.

--  
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun
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Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 2019-08-08 07:06, David Taylor wrote:
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Since it is not mentioned in this thread yet: have you checked for  
correct permissions?
The user running the program needs to have correct permissions to access  
the device. This is a very common problem with usb devices other than  
the most common devices like keyboards, mice and so on.

A quick test to check if this is the problem is to try to run the  
program as the root user (example: sudo program ...) if it works, then  
you most likely have a permissions problem.

And then you get to fix that via udevadm and friends...
--  
Torfinn Ingolfsen,
Norway

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
Torfinn Ingolfsen wrote:
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Ah well, the joys of shared computing. That was why personal comuting
was such a great hit while it lasted. One user, my machine. No need to
negotiate rights with anyone.

--  




/ \  Mail | -- No unannounced, large, binary attachments, please! --

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 09/08/2019 21:40, Axel Berger wrote:
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...for Virus writers...


  while it lasted. One user, my machine. No need to
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--  
In todays liberal progressive conflict-free education system, everyone  
gets full Marx.

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
The Natural Philosopher wrote:
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There are lots of kinds of protection against malware. The only reliable
one could I ever find was Brain 1.0. So far it has kept me safe and
never failed me once. All the others cause lots of hassle and extra
effort, but none of them is reliable. On the contrary, by making
everything more complicated and harder to grasp and keep on top of, they
make it easier for unintended immigrants to slip through.

--  




/ \  Mail | -- No unannounced, large, binary attachments, please! --

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 11:30:00 +0200, Axel Berger wrote:

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Adding a well-thought-out file ownership and access permission system  
helps a lot, provided users don't do terminally stupid things like  
assigning superuser properties to their normal login. This is where Unix  
introduced a sensible access control system, which Linux also uses, while  
Windows in inherently insecure by design.  

The only major item missing from *nix implementations is more rigorous  
hardware implemented controls on memory access by running processes.  
Intel has a minimal, but seemingly adequate set of hardware protection  
rings but no current operating systems appear to make full use of it:  
among other things, proper use of the hardware rings of protection would  
prevent scripted nasties, etc in e-mails and web pages from accessing any  
memory outside their immediate environment.

I've used mainframe operating systems that could do exactly what I've  
described, so know it can be done and, what's more, do that without  
interfering with legitimate users doing what they need to do.  


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On 10/08/2019 12:04, Martin Gregorie wrote:
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Windose was designed as a single user non networked design.
What Gates SHOULD have done is intsead of NT, adapted and written a  
pretty face for unix/linux


--  
"It is an established fact to 97% confidence limits that left wing  
conspirators see right wing conspiracies everywhere"

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 13:03:54 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

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Quite - because until NT arrived Windows nothing more than a graphical  
desktop sat on top of MSDOS 7, and MSDOS had never heard of security, and  
even networking was just a 3rd party add-on until Windows 3.11 appeared.
  
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Exactly so. The real surprise is that OS/2, the joint project with IBM,  
wasn't better than it was: by then IBM was starting to write decent  
operating systems, starting with Future Series, (which morphed into OS/
400) and AIX. I used OS/400 quite extensively: it was reliable, bug-free  
and very logical to use once you overlooked its two major deficiencies:  
9 character names without extensions and it didn't have a hierarchic  
filing system. Maybe better features of these couldn't be beaten into the  
thick heads in Microsoft?


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 12:26:56 -0000 (UTC), Martin Gregorie

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    Some of them did get in... Since some of WinNT was inspired by DEC's
VMS...  And I doubt anyone would claim VMS is an insecure OS given how
heavily it was used for defense related work.  

    Unfortunately, they didn't scrap the MS-DOS command line and file
naming... <G> (Come on... Why allow drives/partitions to have volume NAMES
when you can't use the name to reference them! Strangely, AmigaOS better
matched VMS when it came to things like volume and logical [which are NOT
related to UNIX/Windows environment variables] names) and the requirement
to maintain 16-bit compatibility probably made the user-level much weaker
for security.

https://www.itprotoday.com/compute-engines/windows-nt-and-vms-rest-story
https://everything2.com/title/The+similarities+between+VMS+and+Windows+NT


--  
    Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 11:24:44 -0400, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:

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DEC's
The+similarities+between+VMS+and+Windows+NT

An interesting read: thanks. I've done little to no development using NT,  
though I did a project or two using VAX VMS and DEC's database RDB.

The main things I remember about VMS were not much liking the concept of  
having a few massive utility programs and that noticing that there were a  
lot of similarities between the way the VMS command interpreter works and  
ICL's George 3 command interpreter - I liked this because I'd been a G3  
sysadmin and found the similarities helpful when getting to grips with  
using VMS for development and writing scripts for it.

I knew a lot more about DEC's UNIX on Alphaserver boxes than I ever knew  
about VMS, but this was because by the time I met the Alphaserver I'd  
used several Unices and Unix workalikes (TSC Uniflex, Microware's OS-9  
and Stratus VOS) and gotten to grips with Tandem's Guardian OS - not one  
of my favourites, but at least it was better than IBM's horrid MVS/370.


--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 17:00:49 -0000 (UTC), Martin Gregorie

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    VMS was much better documented. Something like three/four feet of 3"
thick 3-ring binders. Think there were two or three binders just for the
SYS$ system calls, another for RMS$ (record management services). Manuals
for each compiler...  

    Try finding that stuff for M$ -- it's a pain, often scattered about.
("Programming Windows 6th Ed" focused on Win8 "Apps" using C#; the "Windows
Internals" books describe how the OS works, but don't really provide
anything on the Win32 system calls themselves).

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    I don't recall those... At least I could make sense of the compiler
options since compile and link were separate (and, in practice, we would
stuff object files into a library so the link statement basically
referenced just the main function and the library as a whole)... Unlike the
common invocation of "gcc" which attempts to do everything via one command
invocation.


--  
    Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sun, 11 Aug 2019 11:54:03 -0400, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:

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3"
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about.
They were basically surprisingly large programs, each with a sort of mini-
shell worked interactively. This tended to be quite noticeable - and  
could be hard to work round in command scripts, though probably not a big  
issue if they were being used interactively. IIRC there was one for file  
management. I thought this was odd, the more so as every other OS I'd  
used up to then (Georges 1,2 and 3, Flex, DOS, UniFlex and VOS) had a  
recognisably separate command line interpreter and a whole bunch of  
separate commands, though not always as clearly separated out as they are  
in Unix/Linux.
  
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Almost every compilation system I've used has split out compiling and  
linking as separate operations and some have separated the preprocessor  
from the compiler. The PLAN assembler (ICL 1900) had a preprocessor with  
a syntactically different language which was powerful enough to let you  
define your own special purpose languages - rather like using yacc+lex as  
a front end for C, Coco/R as a front-end for Java or the IDMS database  
preprocessor as front-end for COBOL.  

OTOH I've never needed to separate the C preprocessor from its compiler  
phase since its so much an integral part of C. WQhen you come to  
languages like Algol 68 the whole thing is so self-referential that  
everything is rolled into a single compilation executable with no real  
distinction made between the code you're working on and the standard  
prelude and project-defined modes, operators and functions which together  
define the compilation environment.    

On top of that, a lot of languages / compilation systems have an  
equivalent of C's 'make' - there are two for Java (ant and maven) - and  
IMO anyway, are nearly essential for developing any program thats big  
enough that splitting it into a set of source files simpifies its  
development.  

Please don't lets get onto IDEs: I like make and ant a lot but am not  
particularly fond of IDEs - I've used the Borland C IDE and IntelliJ for  
Java fairly intensively and decided I'm a lot happier using my favourite  
editor plus, depending on the language being written, using its  
equivalent of 'make' to manage the compilation process.
  

--  
Martin    | martin at
Gregorie  | gregorie dot org

Re: Airspy USB on Raspberry Pi model 2B, doesn't work in Buster?
On Sun, 11 Aug 2019 17:37:05 -0000 (UTC), Martin Gregorie


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    Never needed anything more than copy/rename/delete/purge and set
attributes/protection.

    There may have been something specific to creating ISAM files with
defined record structures from the command line. (Ah, yes -- "Writing Real
Programs in DCL" states that one needs to use "File Definition Language
Facility" to specify the attributes of indexed files; never needed it
myself as the FORTRAN 77 OPEN statement accepted enough keyword arguments
to define indexed files within that language).

  

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    Oh, we did have MMS (tightly coupled to CMS which was the code
versioning package). MMS was not language specific -- especially since once
one got to the object file, libraries and linking were the same for all.
And since all DEC languages shared calling conventions (well -- with use of
overrides: %val(arg) to pass the value of a variable rather than the
default FORTRAN address reference, similar for Pascal...) having a mixed
environment application was feasible.



--  
    Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/

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