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Re: Learning Electrical Repair
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No argument. I've just never seen a book that thoroughly covers the basics
of electronic servicing in a clear and useful way.



Re: Learning Electrical Repair
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"The Art of Electronics" covers all that matters from simplest to complex
electronic circuits.
How to troubleshoot is another matter and probably comes from really
understanding how things should work in the first place.
One good text is "Troubleshooting Analog Circuits" by Bob Pease, but that's
not intended for newcomers to the electronic world (my opinion).
Best regards
Frank

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
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I believe that is book focuses on correcting design problems, not fixing
existing equipment. (I have a copy, but have only browsed it.)



Re: Learning Electrical Repair
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more or less yes, but gives quite some hints about how to check for problems
whether or not caused by design flaws.
As I said, I believe that fixing things works best when one knows how to
make those things from scratch. Many won't agree with me of course.
Regards

Frank

Re: Learning Electrical Repair

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   The third edition has been 'due any doay now' for several years. :(


--
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scientist!!!

Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On 11/25/2010 4:38 AM William Sommerwerck spake thus:

[other attribution lost due to W.S.'s lax method of quoting]

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No, you're starting to play that Usenet game called "Telephone". The
O.P. said nothing about transistors; I brought up the subject. Dunno if
they're even interested in that.

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I have a book right here that does an excellent job of explaining
transistors and diodes, both their theories of operation and practical
usage in circuits: it's Albert Paul Malvino's /Electronic Principles/
(1979), including knowledge useful for troubleshooting. One of the
best-written texts on the subject I've read.


--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.

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Re: Learning Electrical Repair
I agree, that most textbooks don't provide much info that is in any way
helpful to understand transistor operation, from a troubleshooting
perspective.

Back in the mid-late 80s there was a guy named Vince Diehl(sp?) that
developed a piece of test equipment for quickly troubleshooting TV startup
problems on the then-popular chopper circuit/flyback-scan-derived-LV chassis
designs.

The tester's important feature was to clearly indicate that the fault was in
a particular section of the chassis, so wasted time checking the other
sections was eliminated.
The only circuit connection required was a plug that was installed in place
of the HOT.

He was offering anyone a significant reward (maybe $100k in 2 page magazine
ads) if they could correctly diagnose a faulty/dead chassis problem faster
with any of Sencore's equipment, or any other brand.

Anyway, Vince also had (or access to) some publishing equipment, and had
written some very good troubleshooting procedure booklets, one part being
about transistor operation.. a couple of basic rules-of-thumb were described
as:

A transistor is a switch, sometimes operated slowly, sometimes fast,
partially on or fully on.
Changing the present state of the switch only required about 0.6V, basically
from any source of the correct potential (but he gave much more detailed
examples).

His approaches for troubleshooting were described differently than any other
source that I've seen.

Homer Davidson was a popular author then, with a background in electronic
repair (I believe), and I don't remember one thing I read that he'd written
after reading several of his books (often filled with pics of modern test
equipment, but basically just parroted stuff common to many electronic
books).

Sencore later developed a tester that also had a plug that was inserted in
place of the HOT.
I once asked a Sencore "application engineer"/salesman if they were
concerned about Vince's reward challenge, and if Vince might've been a
former equipment engineer at Sencore.
His answers seemed intentionally vague to me.

--
Cheers,
WB
.............


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Re: Learning Electrical Repair
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Downloadable from:

http://khup.com/keyword/navpers-10087.html

The warnings at the end of some chapters are good reading...

John :-#)#

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  John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
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Re: Learning Electrical Repair
On 11/23/2010 11:01 PM John Robertson spake thus:

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They are amusing.

But seriously, I wouldn't recommend any of these books to someone trying
to learn basic electronics. They're interesting as historical
curiosities, but they're so out of data (not to mention badly written)
as to be a hindrance, not a help, to a newbie.


--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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