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ECC memory under Windows


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No way to tell; windows doesn't release their source code.  Maybe
doing so would upset some fragile part of Windows.  Maybe this is
one of the many parts of Windows where Microsoft no longer has
the knowledge to make any changes.  Perhaps the memory manufacturers
are paying Microsoft to not report errors.  Unless software is
Open Source, these kinds of questions can never be answered.


--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
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Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965


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You should see the looks I get when talking about "control cards" when
referring to JCL.  Every new programmer should have to punch up a deck
and learn why sequence numbers are worth the effort.  ;-)))


Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965
@fe1.texas.rr.com:

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/hug card sorter

--
Richard

Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965

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Ha, now you got me why I could not come up with the right picture.

I thought core dump == kernel dump. But actually it's memory dump.

I loved this word, now I do like it even more :-)

Thanks.

BTW: I saw one, but only at the German Museum in Munich.


---
42Bastian
Do not email to snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com, it's a spam-only account :-)
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Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965

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I actually have a core memory board that looks very similar to the ones in
that link.  I can't remember how I acquired it, as I certainly have never
seen the machine that it came from.  This particular one, is made by Litton
Memory Products, and is a G645E 8K x 19 bit 3W-3D 18mil Planar Memory (so
says the board).

I find it interesting to hear from some of the people that worked with these
older machines.

Thanks for the trip down memory lane (though, not my memories),

Mike Anton



Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com wrote in message
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64-bits is 8 bytes.  262,000 * 8 = 2,096,000 bytes per bank.
2 banks would be 4,192,000 bytes.  Did I miss something?

Best Wishes

Four Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965

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My error.  I forgot to multiply by two cabinets  D'oh!

--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
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Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965
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IIRC, Univac 1108 was 36 bits / word.

Tauno Voipio
tauno voipio @ iki fi


Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965
On Thu, 27 May 2004 01:53:31 -0700, Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com wrote:

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Are you sure about the 64 bit memory word length, since the 1108 was a
36 bit machine, so a 64 bit memory word width does not make sense even
with parity or ECC bits. IIRC there was also some 1:1 interleave so
that odd memory addresses came from one module and the even addresses
from an other module, thus speeding up sequential access (a core
memory read access required that the controller wrote back the value
read back into the core).

Paul


Re: Two Megabytes of Core Memory in 1965


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_A history of Univac computers and Operating Systems_
[ http://www.cs.und.edu/~rmarsh/CLASS/CS451/HANDOUTS/os-unisys.pdf ]
says  "Just as the first UNIVAC 1108s were being delivered,
Sperry Rand announced the 1108 II ... The memory units were
for program storage and data storage, each holding up to 262,000
64-bit words."

--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner
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On April 7, 1964, the IBM System/360 announcement included systems with
up to 512 Kbytes of main memory and optionally from 1 to 8 Mbytes of
slower (8 us) "bulk core storage".  First customer shipment was in
1965.

But several years earlier, IBM shipped their first computer that could
directly address more than a megabyte.

The IBM 7030 Data Processing System (AKA "Stretch") had a typical
configuration of six IBM 7302 core storage units, each of which was
organized as 16384 words of 72 bits.  It was the first computer to use
ECC memory, so 64 of those bits were data.  Each 7302 stored 128 Kbytes.
The typical six-unit configuration stored 768 Kbytes, though the system
could be expanded to 16 units for a total of 2 Mbytes.

First customer delivery of a 7030 was to Los Alamos Scientific
Laboratories in April 1961, with customer acceptance in May 1961.

Note that the 7302 core storage unit was more commonly used in an
organization of 32768 words of 36 bits, as used on the 7090, 7094, and
perhaps other machines.

Early 7302 core storage units were oil-filled, but later ones (7302A?)
were air-cooled.




Early large memories (was: How to choose a firmware partner)
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You guys are in the wrong place for this stuff.  Try
alt.folklore.computers.  Crossposted and followups set.  It is OT
for comp.arch.embedded.

--
fix (vb.): 1. to paper over, obscure, hide from public view; 2.
to work around, in a way that produces unintended consequences
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner
On Thu, 27 May 2004 00:56:12 GMT, "Anthony Fremont"

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These were Varian (later Sperry, then SSCI) machines. The originals
could handle only 64 MB, as I recall. Our earlier systems sometimes
shipped with less than that. Later, they introduced the "Megamap"
which extended addressing capability to a megabyte by use of page
mapping registers. I don't remember when the Megamap was introduced.
It might not have been until the V-70 series.

--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner

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Good grief. Make that KB, of course. Actually 32K 16-bit words. The
early models were not byte addressable (except for the byte macros I
wrote into the assembler.)

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--
Al Balmer
Balmer Consulting
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner
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Older than that.  Back in vacuum tube days they took the form of
retriggerable oneshots or the equivalent.  Thyratrons were known
to enter the picture.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner

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Roman soldiers sounded off in turn while pulling guard duty.  
If the voice from the east wall didn't happen, the entire regiment
would be woken up to investigate.  That system was a watchdog timer.

--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner
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And it is even not an invention of electronic-age.

- railway-signals used to have something alike
- dead-man button in trains
---
42Bastian
Do not email to snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com, it's a spam-only account :-)
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner

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The first watchdog timers I came across was in 1980 and had been included
in the product for a year or two prior to that.  As this was roughly the
dawn of embedded processing it is not what I would call "fairly recent."

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As do many newer systems, too, but this alone is, at best, a specious
argument against WDTs.


BTW, the product to which I refer is the control panels for the 440 line
of video/audio/timecode routing switchers produced by Grass Valley Group
for the television broadcast industry.  These were 8048-based, developed
on 8080-based Intel MDS-230 (Blue Box!) development systems, and
communicated serially with Z80-based controllers.  I miss those days, not
so much for the processors and tools but because the economics at that time
allowed engineers, rather than accountants, to call the product development
shots.

--
========================================================================
          Michael Kesti            |  "And like, one and one don't make
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Re: How to choose a firmware partner
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Ah... the Intel MDS <sigh of nostalgia>. I still miss the editor, CREDIT...
Around '83 I used to tote around the MDS's little brother, the iPDS... which
had 5-1/4" disks - whoa! radical!

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time
development

Errr... yeah, but do you remember how much those suckers used to cost? I
think the iPDS cost us (with ICE, which was around half of the total, IIRC)
around 13 kilobucks... Back then development systems were major capital
investment. Nowadays it's a PC and GNU ;).

Steve
http://www.sfdesign.co.uk
http://www.fivetrees.com



Re: How to choose a firmware partner
On Wed, 26 May 2004 17:37:52 +0100, "Steve at fivetrees"
[...]
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It wasn't a bad editor at the time.  I liked it so much, I wrote a
paper for my employer using it.  This was back in the day when SOP was
to write it out longhand and hand the chicken scratch to a secretary.
This was also before I got used to Windoze and computers that crashed,
so I spent about 3 hours on it before trying to save it.

Unfortunately, I made a typo and tried to save the file to the system
disk -- which was full.  "Insufficient space" error message followed
by -- the ISIS prompt.  Game over.  Thanks for playing.  Aargh.

The second version of the paper only took about an hour and a half,
and was probably better overall.  But I learned my lesson (one of them
anyway).

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

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