EU lead-free directive

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Hi,

This comes in mid-2006 and AIUI requires that lead content is below
0.1%.

Surely, one could achieve this by making the overall product heavier?

Or does it work on a per-circuit-board basis? In that case, the lead
in standard solder will probably weigh more than 0.1% of the weight of
the populated PCB....

This could be a serious problem for any company that is slowly running
down a stock of old chips. These won't be lead-free, and neither will
be any chips purchased from the many used chip vendors who pass on
surplus stock. I expect a lot of their business will dry up since many
companies are requiring *zero* lead content on *all* components.

Any views?


Re: EU lead-free directive

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I heard that too, that you can pass the limits by
delivering the electronics on top of a 5 pound solid
steel slab. That is almost infinitely silly.

Since the leaded cases can easily be combined with the
rest of the leadfree technology, eg leadfree pcb,
leadfree solder, ... I'd just use up the stock
and just don't tell anyone.

Rene

Re: EU lead-free directive
Rene Tschaggelar schrieb:

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You're wrong, it works vice versa: you can easily use lead-free parts in a
lead-containing process (except for BGAs, and unless the higher soldering
temperature won't damage the older parts that were built for lower temperatures).
Once you have switched to leadfree solder in the wave soldering machine, any
lead-containing part (especially PCBs with HAL) will contaminate the solder. Of
course you need /many/ parts before the solder reaches 0.1% lead...

(SMT/Reflow is much simpler in this concern, as the solder does not touch
anything else.)

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive

[...]
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I am reminded of a mass-produced packaged "lunch" sold by a well-known
American company that consists of crackers, lunch meat (e.g., cold
ham, turkey, or sausage), cheese slices, a small candy bar, and a
container of fruit juice.  Because of the labeling laws in the U.S.,
the weight of the juice was included in the weight of the product, and
the weight of "fat" as a proportion of the total weight of the product
was below a specified threshold, so it could be sold as "low fat."

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: EU lead-free directive

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No-one's going to be checking anyway !

Graham


Re: EU lead-free directive
Hello Graham,

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Except when a competitor is desperately looking for a chance to blow
your company out of the water.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: EU lead-free directive
Peter schrieb:

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It works on a per-material basis.

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Yes, it is a problem, and it has already been discussed here and elsewhere.

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive


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What does this mean?

Re: EU lead-free directive
Peter schrieb:

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Each material must be RoHS conform, for example contain less than 0.1% lead
(similar tresholds exist for the other "evil" substances).

As an example, often an IC is used: it consists of
a) the die itself
b) the leadframe
c) the expoxy encasing
d) the surface finish of the leads.

*Each* of these materials must conform to the RoHS directive.

Another example is a simple cable, where the metal wire is defined as a single
material and the plastic insulation as another material, and both must conform
to the RoHS limits.

For assembled boards, this extents to the PCB base material, its surface finish
(HAL) where it persists after soldering, the solder, and all parts (for those
see above).

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive


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Thank you for the explanation. This in effect means that chips (SMT ot
PTH) with leaded solder on their legs cannot be used.

There will be a LOT of stock being scrapped. Smaller companies will
just lie :) Remove the datecodes on any such chips of course, as
anything dated before about 2004 isn't likely to be ROHS compliant.

A really stupid regulation, given the huge amount of lead used in car
batteries for example....


Re: EU lead-free directive
Peter schrieb:

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Exactly. And particularly these are one of the exceptions, and will be used
without any change.

--
Dipl.-Ing. Tilmann Reh
http://www.autometer.de - Elektronik nach Maß.

Re: EU lead-free directive

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This is an entirely sensible approach, as lead-acid batteries can be very easily
extracted from
discarded products and recycled  unlike lead in components.

Re: EU lead-free directive
On Wednesday, in article

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They have been for years! Not really a change.

--
Paul Carpenter          | snipped-for-privacy@pcserviceselectronics.co.uk
<http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/ PC Services
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: EU lead-free directive
[...]

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Not really, considering the usually responsible way used up batteries are
dealt with, and the usually convenient way used up electronics are dealt
with.


Re: EU lead-free directive
Hello Bryan,

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Car batteries yes. Mostly. But what about those things with sealed lead
acid batteries in them?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: EU lead-free directive
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So your point is:

a) Lead batteries should be highly regulated

b) Since lead batteries are the worst lead offenders by an order of magnitude,
     all other lead regulation is pointless

c) Something else


Note, I'm not supporting or denigrating any point.

Re: EU lead-free directive

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Yes, a deposit on them, say $400. You pay it once, and redeem it by
handing in the old battery. Like we used to do with bottles in the 60s.

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Not pointless, just less cost effective, and as people keep pointing
out, damaging to an already fragile industry.

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Shouldn't be too difficult to extract the lead from PCBs, if the
political will is there (roast them at 300 degrees in a centrifuge?) We
need to encourage recovery and re-use over dumping anyway.

Paul Burke

Re: EU lead-free directive

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FWIW, here in Michigan, there is a core charge for lead-acid car
batteries, though I believe it's much less than $400. I'm not sure of
the exact amount, because the core cancels when you replace a battery
(here's my old one, give me a new one).

[...]

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PCB metals recycling has been around a long time.  Usually, though,
they're after stuff more valuable than lead.

Regards,

                               -=Dave
--
Change is inevitable, progress is not.

Re: EU lead-free directive


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That probably produces dioxins !

I've seen stuff about 'recycling' pcbs and I can't believe there's any
sense in it.

Graham


Re: EU lead-free directive

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What do you make of:

http://europa.eu.int/eur-lex/pri/en/oj/dat/2003/l_037/l_03720030213en0019 =
0023.pdf

"Applications of lead, mercury, cadmium and hexavalent chromium, which20%
are exempted from the requirements of Article 4(1)...
7. 97% Lead in high melting temperature type solders (i.e. tin-lead20%
solder alloys containing more than 85 % lead)"

Why would they make an exception for solder that has over double the20%
lead of that most commonly used for electronics?  Does this mean that20%
if producers of electronics can find a way to use 85% lead solder,20%
they are exempt?



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