16 bit microcontrollers

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Which are the most common 16 bit microcontrollers on the market today?



Re: 16 bit microcontrollers

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Black ones, with silvery connectors
Alf



Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
I thought it was a good question, anyone have any real answers?

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Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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BTW, did you know www.googlefight.com ?

Here's a fight HC12 versus C166:

http://www.googlefight.com/cgi-bin/compare.pl?q1=hc12&q2=c166&B1=Make+a+fight%21&compare=1&langue=us

Re: 16 bit microcontrollers

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No, cool :-)
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Well, name it correctly: 6812 versus C166 => 6812 wins :-)

=> Do not trust a statistic you have not faked yourself !
:-)

Ok, becoming completly OT :-)

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42Bastian

Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
Motorola 68HC12 I think

Infineon C167 as well

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Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
Or Hitachi H8S (nice tools free downloadable from Hitachi).

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Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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Or 68k (Motorola counts it a 16bit CPU !)

Or ARM7TDMI (with a 16bit bus => cellular phones/handies)

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42Bastian

Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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MSP430 for very low power operation. Max Frequency 8MHz. Only 64k memory
map. No external data bus.
Lots of different peripherals including LCD-controller,ADC,DAC.
Not expensive. Samples available from www.ti.com.

MIKE



Re: 16 bit microcontrollers

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Nice chip and easy to use in the right context.  However, the 3.6V (or
thereabouts) max supply voltage really limits their application,
unfortunately.  So many peripherals require a 5V part.  :(

Cheers,

--
Alf Katz

snipped-for-privacy@remove.the.obvious.ieee.org



Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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Haven't yet found anything I couldn't get in 3V3, equally a small
booster in a SOT23 ppkg is simple to add if necessary.

Al

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Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
I've been poking around with an idea to build a small microcontroller
box...  32-bit is way too much, and 8-bit is a pain in the rear. ;)

I too, am interested in 16-bit uCs...  My interest is in one with 16-bit
ALU/registers, and some nice onboard components (the latter will be
shipped off to daughter boards, so no real specific requests, but the
more I can bus to the daughter boards, the less hardware they'll need to
carry).

Problem I've found, is that I need room for a tad over 64k (100k or
there abouts, I suspect), which seems to be a regular limitation with
the 16-bit processors I've looked at.

Anyone know a solid, avaliable processor with 16-bit internals, and a 17-
or 18- bit address bus, or at least a reasonably efficient means of
faking one.  Good range of onchip goodies is a bonus.  :)


Fredderic

Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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... snip ...
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The 64180, or Z180 (Hitachi/Zilog).  They have the advantage of a
plethora of CP/M software availability, which can run directly.
The Rabbit is in the same general class, but unfortunately has
abandoned binary Z80 compatibility, and so does not have the
benefit of the existing software.

--
Chuck F ( snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com) ( snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net)
   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
Oh, I forgot to add...  I only need a couple MHz processor clock.
Which is my main reason for wanting to avoid 32-bit processors.
These are intended to be kits, and high-speed combined with home
soldering, isn't always a good mix.  ;)  That and a minimum of
supporting hardware required.


Fredderic

Re: 16 bit microcontrollers
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If these are intended to be kits, you need to consider availability of
low cost tools, books and knowledge base, so you need a cpu that has
been around for a long time with an established track record. The MSP430
would be an excellent choice, but I would go straight to 68k. It's a low
speed design, not particualarly fussy about board layout and some
variants are static, which means no problem with slow clocks. It's
arguably the most generic 16/32 bit cpu around. There are dozens of good
books and more good quality tools around than you can shake a stick at,
many of them free. Finally, it's a classic cpu architecture. Designed
with compiled languages in mind, with few gotchas and a excellent
example of how a cpu should be designed, if you are targetted this kit
as educational...

Chris

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