DSE Q1803 $128 CRO

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View



Hi to all,

Picked up one of these 10MHz, single beam CROs from my local DSE store last
Tuesday  -  there were none on display and the staff seemed unaware of its
existence.  The unit comes in a carry box, well packed with IEC mains lead,
10:1 probe and small handbook written by DSE staff.

Using a bench sine/ square generator and frequency counter when back at
home, I found my unit met published accuracy specs  -  time base speeds
being particularly accurate.

The *green* trace on the 75m dia tube face is particularly sharp and
geometry is very good all over the (external) graticule.
The vertical and horizontal positioning pots allow the pattern to be moved
right off the screen without visible limiting  -  so the deflection
amplifiers have adequate headroom.

The internal (Y) synch appears to function well as does the external and
LINE synch inputs. There is an X-Y mode that works fine too. There is no
"trace rotate " control,  but two screws on the rear can be loosened to
allow the tube and hence trace to be lined up with the graticule OK.

Now for the insides:
-----------------------

With the vinyl coated steel sleeve slid off,  there is a nice surprise.
This little CRO is *very* well made -  reminiscent of the way Aussie firm
BWD built their famous CROs.

There are no SMD, all parts are "garden variety"  -  ie TO92 pack
transistors, TO220 regulators, a couple of fets and 3 bog standard ICs.
There is one large PCB for the PSU, deflection and synch circuits while a
smaller one at the front covers the vertical attenuator, input pre-amp and
time base circuitry.

Both sides of these (single sided, through hole) PCBs are fully accessible
for servicing !

A very neat, 20 VA, R-core transformer powers the CRO with a ferrite HF
inverter supplying 1200 volt DC to the tube. All internal voltages remain
regulated down to 200 volts AC input.

The 75mm tube is covered in a black, very snug fitting, full length
MAGNETIC  SHIELD !!  This is practically unheard of in a low cost CRO and
means the unit can be used, without annoying trace jitter, quite close to AC
power transformers used by other items on the bench or the equipment under
test.

The AC current draw was only  84mA rms ( 20 VA ) -  so operation from a
small 12volt / 240 volt inverter supply is possible.

One anomaly I found  -  the CRO comes fitted with a 0.75 amp AC  fuse. The
DSE handbook and the back label on the CRO both say this is the intended
value  -  which is nonsense since it offers no protection for the 20 VA
transformer.  Best replace it with a 160 mA, slo-blo type.

Although not indicated anywhere, I expect the CRO was manufactured in China
or just possibly Korea.  One would have to remove the CRO tube to see where
that was made.

My conclusion:

At a mere $ 128 inc GST and probe, this has got to be the biggest bargain in
*new* test gear you can buy in Australia.




.......  Phil




Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks for the excellent review, Phil. Might get one of these myself,
I'm sick of making do without a CRO.

Clifford Heath.

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



"Clifford Heath"
Quoted text here. Click to load it


** Any electronics hobbyist without a basic CRO is flying blind.

 Treat yourself before DEE change their mind or delete it.

 Then you  *will*  have something to CRO about !






......    Phil








Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



Quoted text here. Click to load it

So the truth finally has come out hey Phil?
It IS a HOBBY business you're running from that bed-sit flat you rent.
LOL!



Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Bug off, Rutlidge. It's obvious that I'm the hobbyist.
Try not starting a fight for a change, and offer something
of half the value of what Phil has instead. If you can.

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



Quoted text here. Click to load it

First off Clifford, if I wanted to have a go at you I'd have
directed my reply fairly and squarely at YOU, by mentioning
YOUR name.  Find where I mentioned your name in that reply
and I'll be more than prepared to apologise to you.

Secondly, the CRO is quite okay for a hobbyist, and probably
perfectly adequate for your personal needs, BUT Phil claims
he is a PROFESSIONAL audio technician.  Anyone who is or was
would know a 10MHz single trace CRO with such a small (75mm)
screen wouldn't cut the mustard in the professional ranks.
I'm surprised Phil has bothered to buy one, except of course if
he didn't have a better CRO to begin with. :P

If I offered one of these DSE CROs in question for use in class,
even the 1st year electronics students would LTAO.

Nuff said.....

Cheers,
Alan




Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I knew you weren't having a go at me. I was just objecting
at you trying to turn a perfectly focussed and relevant
chat about a CRO, into one about Phil. I'm not interested
in whatever personality defects you or Phil exhibit, I just
wish you'd make an effort to keep things civil and on-topic
instead of deliberately up-ending every thread he enters.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Oh, I get it - you aren't even making real money from your
knowledge, just teaching it instead. Pot, kettle, black!

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not up ending his post, just commenting - there is a difference.
However whilst you are on the subject you might check Phil's
track record for squeeky cleanness.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Ha, ha, ha, very funny Clifford, but you left the toaster bit out. :-)
It's supposed to go "Pot, kettle, toaster, black."  :P

Well, Clifford, teaching electronics must be a significantly more profitable
business than fixing it.  Take Phil's non-GST reporting business.  To
qualify
to trade as a non-GST reporting entity his annual turnover (yes turnover,
before deductions, tax etc - NOT profit) must be under $50k.
Now this would be okay if you were semi-retired and just running a part-time
business to keep oneself active or to make a bit of pocket money, but you
can't seriously make a living from it.  Considering Phil rents his flat
yadda,
yadda, yadda; I can't imagine (and nor can my accountant) how someone
could scrap a living out of that business situation.

Phil tells us all the time that he is a professional technician.  If the
most useful
piece of test equipment in his workshop is a $128 DSE CRO - hmmmm well
I somehow would question his claimed credentials of being "professional".
As I said, the average electronics TAFE level student would laugh their arse
off
if presented with the DSE CRO and asked to do a lab with it.

Oh, and BTW, I'm not knocking the fact that he has decided to evaluate the
DSE
CRO and post it here.  I think it was a good idea and he should be applauded
for
doing so.

Cheers,
Alan




Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


don't_spam_me snipped-for-privacy@iinet.net.au says...

Quoted text here. Click to load it

sob sob, I'm still using a pair of HP1631D cros' have them linked via
ext trigger in/out so makes multiple time base setting easy, these things
are about 20 years old and although only 6 bits screen resolution are
great for digital analysis and come with logic analyser if needed, have
a dual floppy unit somewhere on hp-ib but cant read the format on a pc :(

Anyone have s/w that works on a pc to read the LIF format of HP floppies ?

Though the dse analog cro does sound tempting, if I dont blow the budget
on too much food and whine this w/end I might get one for the kids ;-)

Its somewhat ironic that a good meal at a restaurant for a couple is
more than a piece of essential equipment for an electronics lab <shrug>


--
Regards
Mike
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Way way back when IBM PC's were new, there was a company in Canberra
called FBN software, and they had a product called PC Alien, that could
read many "foreign" disk formats on the IBM PC.

I just tried a quick google, but I couldn't find anything relevant in
the first few pages, but if you're serious about reading the disks, this
could be an avenue to explore.

Peter

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's possible that I have something on an old DAT tape at work.
I've been meaning to list its contents for some time - maybe this
is the week... I'll post again if I find something.

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


snipped-for-privacy@iinet.net.au (Mike) wrote in
Quoted text here. Click to load it

 No, I don't, but my very first thought is to start digging in
the Unix/Linux arena.

 You'll be able to make copies of the contents of the disk with
a 'dd' command (happy to help with details if you need). After
that, google, google, google. I've just had a quuck google for
"linux LIF HP format" and turned up quite a number of potentially
promising options.

 (The point of using 'dd' is that you make a copy of the disk
into a file, put the disk safely away, and then do all your
work on a 'mounted' copy of the floppy without risking damage
to the original.)


 It's interesting to note that the PC world has pretty much
abandoned it's ancestry, whereas the unix and unix-like world
has picked up a lot of the more obscure stuff, and allows it to
carry on.


 HTH,


GB
--
 "Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the
  entrails of the last priest." (Diderot, paraphrasing Meslier)

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Linux used to have drivers that could exert all sorts of non-standard
direct control over a floppy drive with regard to track spacing etc.

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



don't_spam_me snipped-for-privacy@iinet.net.au says...
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you can give me some examples, and some kind of doco on the format
I will have a crack at implementing it on PC. I make no promises on
time though. What does google say about this?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Ha ha - pretty likely too once they realize they've accidently got a
*good* product at a good price. I've done a fair bit by flying blind,
it's amazing what you can improvise, but obviously better not to have
to.

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


Quoted text here. Click to load it

They were $118 here in kiwiland, but that offer ended today.
Bugger!

Bye.
   Jasen

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


[...]
Quoted text here. Click to load it

 I'll admit that I haven't used a CRO since high school, and I'm
not even sure I know how to operate one anymore. Nonetheless, I
still appreciate the detailed review. Thanks Phil.

GB
--
 "Men will never be free until the last king is strangled with the
  entrails of the last priest." (Diderot, paraphrasing Meslier)

Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


   Thanks for the review Phil. My poor old 1968 vintage BWD521 no
longer triggers properly and the vertical attenuator switches keep
growing metallic whiskers and shorting. For the amount that I use a
CRO at home now, that one would probably do most things I need it to
do to more or less replace the 521. It's very tempting, especially
with a shielded CRT...
   Interesting that the photo on the DSE website shows the probe
connected to the X input. :)

Bob



On Sun, 28 May 2006 09:10:00 GMT, GB

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO



"Bob Parker"
Quoted text here. Click to load it


 **  Well, the same pic shows a CRO that is not even powered up.

http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/44799577064ffe6e2740c0a87f9c0755/Product/View/Q1803



........   Phil






Re: DSE Q1803 $128 CRO


   The photographer probably switched it off in disgust when he
couldn't tune a single TV station....



On Sun, 28 May 2006 22:16:41 +1000, "Phil Allison"
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Site Timeline