CMOS Digital IC's

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I would be grateful if someone can suggest a (single) suitable web site that
has application notes and basic circuits for the more popular CMOS digital
IC range.

I want to do some basic experimenting to raise my level of knowledge in the
use of these devices.

Approaching 70 I hope I am not letting myself in for too much!

JD



Re: CMOS Digital IC's


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The Talking Electronics website usually has some useful books, kits and
circuits available to begin with:

http://www.talkingelectronics.com/AllKitsWithPics/Books.html

http://www.talkingelectronics.com/te_interactive_index.html

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This may result in howls of disagreement from experts. If you want to go
'free form', ie. put together a few DIP logic ICs and connect them together
according to your own design, then IMO the easiest way to go is still wire
wrap, at least noone has shown me a better way yet for quick prototyping.

The best sockets for DIPs by far are turned pin sockets. If you can't find
these for wire wrap, then AFAIK you can still obtain 0.1" single inline
headers with wire wrap on one end and a turned pin on the other. You just
snip off the required lengths and insert into 0.1" spacing matrix board to
make up your DIP sockets.

As far as tooling goes, all you need is a hand wire wrapper/unwrapper tool,
and a couple of spools of wire wrap wire. Since you can easily unplug chips
and unwrap connections, your board, sockets and ICs all become reusable.
OTOH, assembly with turned pin sockets and wire wrap is actually extremely
reliable, I have devices made this way that have been running for many years
with no problems.

Good luck and enjoy.



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You have obviously never used a solderless breadboard.

Dave.

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I used both and found the solderless boards easier, Rockby Electronic
also had em on sale once. Also I found the machined pin sockets wore
out after a few insertions and the cheaper wipe contact versions lasted
longer in an EPROM programmer I built.

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I have, and for trying things out you're right, it's easier. The approach
I'm suggesting is more for building something that's going to be put in a
box and used.



Re: CMOS Digital IC's




Bruce Varley wrote:

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For prototyping maybe. Use them in production and chips will 'walk' out of the
sockets due to thermal cycling.

Graham


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I'm interested in your experience with chips walking out the
sockets of machined pin types. What type of product and what
type of vibration environment have you seen this happen in?

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GeoffC wrote:

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Neve DSP boards. It was thermal cycling, although vibration could likely
do it as well. For manufacturing I always use the reversed V-shape
contact that grips the lead like shit sticks to a blanket. They're also
inexpensive.

Graham


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Bob Larter wrote:

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Not true. Mototola divested itself of various 'commodity' transistor and IC /
CPU lines to ON Semiconductor and Freescale.

Motorola still exists, although AFAICS only makes mobile phones now.

Graham

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**This is what I purchased many years ago. It should provide a good, basic
grounding in what you need to know. Included are some projects and pinouts
of most popular types, along with some good theory.

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

As others have suggested, a solderless breadboard, a power supply and you're
good to go.


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Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au



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  While I think of it Jerd, CMOS IC based circuits benefit from inputs
that are not being used being tied to GND with a 4.7M resistor to avoid
picking up mains or other interference. Also inputs that ARE being used
can benefit from such a resistor to GND.

  A 0.1uF capacitor across each IC's power pins helps to bypass the
supply rails and finally, if you do solder up a circuit on a PCB or a
breadboard PCB, make sure you clean the flux off the board with a
toothbrush and metho as the flux can pass enough leakage current between
the close pins of a DIP package CMOS IC to cause problems.

Re: CMOS Digital IC's




Mark Harriss wrote:

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I think you got yourself confused there.

Graham

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to my
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Ok I'll bite... which part?

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JERD wrote:

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Well, there nothing special about the original 4000 series CMOS logic ICs over
74 series 'TTL' types except fpr the supply voltage range. They all perform much
the same functions. Indeed 'TTL' types are usually these days a CMOS version of
the original e.g. 74HC00.

I'd recommend learning logic functions such as combinational, latched, clocked
etc and learn Karnaugh maps.

Graham


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