Basic electronics course

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Looking for a TAFE or Uni course I can take that covers basic electronics by
*distance learning*. I know they aren't offered via Open University, but as
I do have my own electronics lab at home I can do the practicals. Any info
from anyone.



Re: Basic electronics course


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Log onto your state tafe site and look.

Re: Basic electronics course


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http://www.oten.edu.au/oten/study/courses/coursearea.cfm?r11%07

Plenty of options by the looks of it.

More detail on some courses:
http://www.oten.edu.au/oten/course_admin/cils/366_att1.pdf
http://www.oten.edu.au/oten/course_admin/cils/338_att1.pdf

Dave.


Re: Basic electronics course



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You'll wait a long time for basic electronics in 366 if you do it
through OTEN.


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Probably the same for this one.


Porbably cheaper just to buy and built all the Dickless Smith intro
electronic projects. The course cost >$1,000 pa.

Re: Basic electronics course


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Of course, doing the entire course would take a long time. I presume
that you can take individual classes if they are running. Or at least
I believe that used to be the case.

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If you are disciplined and thorough enough then self-learning is a
fine option, plenty of ways to do that. Depends on your goals though.

Perhaps the OP can elaborate.

Dave.


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Yes, I've got the discipline and the gear (and space and time) but not the
ability to travel. Must be able to do at home.

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Unless you need a formal qualification, just look at all the suppliers
of basic electronic kits and purchase them and build them. Usually they
explain how the circuit works quite well.

You will have a more practical and useful knowledge.

However, if you need formal "paper" for work, ask your current/future
employer what they want.

Re: Basic electronics course



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What I am saying is that in first year you do not touch any electronics
even though the subject is Electronics Technology.

 > I presume
 > that you can take individual classes if they are running. Or at least
 > I believe that used to be the case.

OP needs to do correspondence only, which is what I am doing. I've tried
choosing my subjects every semester, but what arrives in the post is
almost entirely different.[1]

Frankly 366 seems to be solely about the power generation field.

Finally getting some digital stuff this time.

I haven't found the notes that useful. You will need to chase up other
texts as they leave gaping holes that are not adequately explained.

[1] I could attend a couple of Sydney colleges, if I didn't mind
travelling all the way across Sydney. Also having major trouble getting
a semester timetable out of any of the ones I've approached.


Re: Basic electronics course

"Gingre"
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**  These days, what jokingly passes for " basic electronics " training
consists of countless hours spent learning how to drive circuit simulation
software that doesn't so you get the same answers some drongo teacher says
are correct plus tediously programming the latest PIC clone to do something
totally silly and useless.

That what interests you ?

Gotta tell ya that is " basic bollocks".

Cos basic electronics is best learned by hands on tinkering with simple
circuits and a CRO.

Plus a shit load of insatiable curiosity.



......  Phil





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    Well put, Phil!

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Although what Phil said may be true of a lot of what is taught at TAFEs, the
quality of the education is wide and varied.
Some TAFEs are totally focussed on just passing students with the bare
minimum of whatever is needed to "get them over the wire".  Many don't focus
on the good ol' basics, consolidated with meaningful labs to help the
student understand what is being studied.  The parallel analogy is the
widespread use of calculators, whereby the student believes whatever answer
comes up on the screen.  Doesn't matter if it is correct or even realistic.
It must be right 'cause the calculator said so.

As a person from the "old school", I think the current TAFE 50 - 60% pass
mark is a joke.  Albeit circuit simulations have their place, nothing quite
replaces putting the components of a circuit together, taking the
measurements with real instruments and trying things out.   Try getting Sim
Circuit to demonstrate to a student what happens to a 0.6W metal film
resistor when it is dissipating (well for a short while) 10 watts of power.
Likewise some skills like high reliability soldering aren't particularly
successful subjects taught by distance education techniques.

Please don't think I'm completely against distance education - I'm not.
Some packages can be very effective, provided they are well written,
illustrated and there is backup support available for the student.  Pity
most are pretty useless as are some instructor led TAFE courses.  In many
cases, the quality of the TAFE module is totally dependant on the lecturer
and the resources available.  Of course, student attitude goes a long way
too.

Just a closing comment.  Some of us can well remember the good ol' days when
it took years to get your Diploma in Electronic Engineering.  Now the
"equivalent" can be gained in as little as 135 days of open learning study.
The industries are primarily to blame for this which has generally lead to a
lower standard of competence of many TAFE graduates.  Many employers see
training as an overhead expense they would rather not have to shell out for.
As a consequence they bargained in workplace experience as the filler for
formal TAFE studies.  The reality is most employers don't fulfil their part
of the bargain and the end result is an apprentice or technician gets
qualified without really being qualified to do the job.

Cheers,
Alan




 



Re: Basic electronics course
I can certainly solder reliably. In fact I suspect I may have most of the
basic electronic knowledge required. But I am self-taught (over many years)
and would like to formalise this and fill in those inevitable gaps.

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Re: Basic electronics course
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Are you looking at getting the qualification to further your career in
(or get into) the field?
If so, which field in particular?

Dave.


Re: Basic electronics course
No, just for the satisfaction of filling in the gaps and formalising the
knowledge gained over the years.

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Re: Basic electronics course

"Gingre"
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** That tells me you have no idea what you actually want to be trained in.

Electronics is an enormous field, with many separate branches that combined
have now invaded almost every aspect of business and ordinary life.

Concentrate your attention on something in particular.

BTW  -  you must have a reasonable grasp of maths and physics to final year
high school level or the whole darn lot will go right over your head.


......   Phil






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In that case I wouldn't bother with the TAFE course, just simply keep
doing what you enjoy doing. That way you'll spend more time learning
the stuff you want (and need) to learn, and less time doing the boring
stuff.
Plenty of books out there if you want to learn more and "fill in the
gaps". Go into a TAFE book shop and have a look for starters.
If you are really keen get some detailed info on the various subjects
that interest you and follow through the syllabus yourself.

Or simply see if you can simply do the exact classes you want without
having to do the whole course.

Dave.


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In my day it took 4 years to complete the electronics course, we had to
learn everything about electronics. I spoke to the head TAFE teacher a
couple of years ago regarding puting on an apprentice, It turns out the
relevant course can be done in a year. So what Dave and Phil said about only
doing what you need is completely valid.



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That's with the on the job experience though right? Or are you talking about
a Degree course?

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I don't see how, an Associate Diploma in Electronics takes two years full
time at Tafe. (equivalent to the old Certificate of Technology course) You'd
have to get a lot of exemptions to do it in one year. Degree courses still
take up to four years full time.
I assume he is actually talking about the newer Certificate and Advanced
Certificate levels, which do NOT compare to a degree, the old COT, or even
the old apprentice technician levels.

MrT.





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The Associate Diploma in Electronics can be attained from only 135 days of
open learning.  In some cases even less if you have some pre-requisites or
RPL.

Cheers,
Alan



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full


As I said, things were always different if you are entitled to exemptions.

MrT.



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