Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen

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Hi,

I have some problems playing files with 4k resolution with VLC (or also
Kaffeine) with a Raspberri pi4.

The audio works well, but the video is always all black.

At the beginning I had setting the screen resolution to 1920 x 1080.
Afterwards I have changed screen resolution to 3960 x 2160, the pi4 show well
the desktop and icons but not 2160p files.

When I try to play a HEVC x265 2160p file with any resolution, VLC show always a
black screen, while with a Full HD 1080p file it show well the footage.

The 2160p file is good because is showed well if I connect the disk to a USB
input of my TV, a SONY BRAVIA, but I prefer the functionalities
of VLC player rather that those of TV interface.

Here the captured screen of VLC  'Settings' and 'Statistic':

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7c3hcru9zwi70le/Codec.png?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/in0j7au6rmoa0p0/Statistics.png?dl=0

Note that the number in the red frame always increases.

Can anyone help me?

--  
ciao
  Stefano

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
the following:


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    Actual spinning disk? Or are you using "disk" for a flash drive?

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    Is there anything else using the USB ports of the R-Pi. Are you using
USB2 or USB3 port? Is the device even rated for USB3 speeds? {At least the
4B has a real Ethernet, not a hidden Ethernet<>USB chip}

    What else is running on the R-Pi?

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    That is NOT showing a "2160p" file... If anything, it is a 1600p30 (if
not 1600i30; suspect p30 as it says "frame rate" not "field rate") -- the
term "2160p" refers specifically to a video with a pixel height of 2160
lines, regardless of width.


--  
    Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
     snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com    http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
Il giorno Sun, 05 Sep 2021 12:10:58 -0400, Dennis Lee Bieber

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The disk is SSD M2 SATA3 external with USB3.1 interface.

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The SSD is connected to USB3 (blue) input of my RPI4b with 4GB of RAM.


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Only Anydesk is running in background, but without active connections.

I also noticed that with 3960 x 2160 screen during the remote connection with
Anydesk the mouse is slow and the percentage of CPU is over 60-70% with only the
desktop active.

Instead with HD screen is all normal.

Probably the UHD resolution is a big job for an rpi.


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The footage comes from a smartphone with resolution 3840 x 1600, I can see it
with my TV without problems, I had also try to recode it with Avidemux, the file
size is increased but the rpi screen with VLC (or Kaffeine also) is always
black.



--  
ciao
  Stefano

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
SB wrote on 06-09-2021 at 10:26:
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Normal 4k resolution is 3840x2160 (not 3960!), that shouldn't be a  
problem for a Pi 4. You can even enable 4k @ 60 fps mode, if your  
monitor/tv supports it. Look at the configuration program in the menu or  
in the Terminal: sudo raspi-config. Best leave it at 30 fps for  
compatibility and a little more performance headroom, though. Also, only  
one of the hdmi ports can do 60 fps.

The ssd should be able to handle this easily. There have been reports of  
slow external ssd's, depending on the chipset of the interface  
apparently. I don't know details, have a look at the forums on the rpi  
website. My Samsung T5 works well.

VLC on the Pi doesn't have hardware acceleration, that's probably the  
limiting factor. Try playing the file with omxplayer from the command  
line (Terminal), that's the only player with hardware accel. as far as I  
know.

Also, the HW accel. is only for h.265 encoded video, I think? Not h.264.  
But the Pi 4 should be fast enough to do that in software. Maybe not in  
4k, though? I don't know.

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
Il giorno Mon, 6 Sep 2021 12:04:16 +0200, "A. Dumas"

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It's not a SSD or USB issue.

After some search it seems that VLC don't use hardware acceleration with the GPU
and hardware for HEVC x265 decoding.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t25%3359
https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f38%&t24%6837

It seems that the solution can be Libreelec with Kodi, but Libreelec is a media
player dedicated os, I'd rather stay on Raspbian os.

Someone said that VLC in a future version can work with HEVC and  4k file, I
hope so.  


--  
ciao
  Stefano

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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Yes, that's what I said. Not for anything.

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Yes, that's because behind the scenes it uses the only hardware accelerated
video player on the Pi, which I also mentioned: omxplayer. So you already
have the solution, you just need to use the terminal. Or write your own
GUI/web interface around it, if you don't like Libreelec.

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
Il giorno Mon, 6 Sep 2021 17:12:01 -0000 (UTC), A. Dumas

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Ok, you was right, man.

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With omxplayer I had only the message:

Vcodec id unknown: ad
have a nice day ;)`

And I didn't find the way to add codecs to omxplayer.

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I could write a simple interface in Python, but there are a lot of interfaces
available  on the web if the program runs well with codecs:

https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/22200/is-there-any-gui-mode-for-omxplayer


--  
ciao
  Stefano

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
Well, it seems I was behind the times (I never play videos with my  
Pi's). From https://github.com/popcornmix/omxplayer :

"Note: omxplayer is being deprecated and resources are directed at  
improving vlc.

This is due to: omxplayer uses openvg for OSD and subtitles which isn't  
supported on Pi4. omxplayer uses openmax which has been deprecated for a  
long time and isn't supported with 64-bit kernels. omxplayer does not  
support software decode omxplayer does not support advanced subtitles  
omxplayer does not support playback from ISO files. omxplayer does not  
integrate with the X desktop

Please try using vlc. If there are features of omxplayer that vlc does  
not handle then try reporting here."

So, VLC is the official way forward. If it doesn't work, ask in the  
official forums, I guess.

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
A. Dumas wrote on 07-09-2021 at 09:36:
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BUT! The developer(s?) seem to be stuck. No hardware helpeing at 4k,  
yet. See https://github.com/RPi-Distro/vlc/issues/47

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
Il giorno Tue, 7 Sep 2021 09:40:31 +0200, "A. Dumas"

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Yep, VLC doesn't work for now .

I have downloaded Libreelec and I will try it on a dedicated SD, and at the end
I have always the TV.

Thank you for the tips,
bye


Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
scritto:


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After a week of usage, I can say that 4K footages are played perfectly on Kodi
on LibreElec os.

Moreover my SONY TV remote control is easily integrated with Librelec, probably
using the I2C interface present in HDMI cable.

There are a world of plugins, and is pretty usable, afterall a good acquisition.


--  
ciao
  Stefano

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
On 16-09-2021 13:24, SB wrote:
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Very nice. Thanks for the update.

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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Can VLC on the Pi actually play 4K video files? I've got VLC 3.0.11  
(Veterinari) and when I try to play a UHD file 3840x2160 50 *frames* per  
second, the VLC window disappears so I suspect it's core-dumping. The same  
file plays fine on the same version of VLC on Windows 10. The file is a VLC  
recording (via TVHeadend on the Pi) of multiplex 12441V on satellite Astra  
28.2, as received in the UK - it's a UHD demo.  
https://i.postimg.cc/N0thyQFK/UHD.png

But your file is lower resolution than the one I'm trying to play, because  
yours is 3840x1600 x 24 (*) frames/sec. At least VLC is decoding the audio  
and displaying that stats for your file, rather than throwing its toys out  
of the pram/stroller.


(*) Shame that when analog TV in the USA was disbanded, a decision wasn't  
taken to make the digital version exactly 30 fps (or 24 fps for 3:2 pulldown  
film), and that the color NTSC "fix" of changing 30 to 29.97 persists ;-)  
Sometimes there are advantages in being second in the race (European PAL):  
we were able to design our 625/25 system on VHF (mainland Europe and  
Ireland) and UHF (UK) so the sound-vision carrier spacing wouldn't collide  
with the colour information once colour was introduced, probably learning  
from the NTSC "experience".  


Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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I suspect that would've made those cheap (free in some cases?) converter
boxes to bring analog-only TVs into the digital era not-so-cheap, as they
would've needed some way to convert 30-fps input to 30000/1001-fps output.

  _/_
 / v \ Scott Alfter (remove the obvious to send mail)
(IIGS( https://alfter.us/ Top-posting!
 \_^_/                              >What's the most annoying thing on Usenet?

Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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I was always surprised that the FM sound circuitry in TVs couldn't tolerate  
the sound carrier being tweaked slightly to move it out of the way of the  
colour sideband.

You'd have thought that when the NTSC colour system was being designed,  
they'd have picked up the potential "collision" of sound and colour on  
broadcast TV, and decided to choose a different multiple of the line  
frequency for the colour sub carrier, rather than fudging things by tweaking  
the frame rate slightly. Or was the multiple that they used "special" in  
that it had lots of small factors whereas other nearby ones had a large  
factor (it's more difficult to design an analogue division circuit that  
divides by a large number).


Was 625/25 lucky, or was the ratio of CSC to line frequency chosen carefully  
to avoid a collision with sound, given NTSC's problems?  


Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
On 11/09/2021 17:48, NY wrote:
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The urban legend has it that coming as it did about the time that
digital electronics and computing were coming into TV that it was
chosen because 405 in decimal becomes 625 when converted to octal.



Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 19:22:34 +0100

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Ummm. Nope.

625 line TV started in the early 1960s. As a TV repairman, I was watching the
BBC2 trade tests in the mid 1960s. I didn't come across any digitisation till
the 1970s, by which time the TV rental business was collapsing.

The PAL system did learn a lot from the NTSC mistakes. The real killer was
swapping the phase of the colour sub carrier on alternate lines. The result was
that any phase shift giving a drift towards red on one line, would be towards
green on the next line, and your brain averages these out so you don't notice
anything wrong :)

--  
W J G


Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
On 11/09/2021 21:29, Folderol wrote:
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Ummm. Yep.

Definitely an urban legend.



Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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In November 2020, Talking Pictures TV showed a recording of a Saturday Night  
at the Palladium programme which had been made using colour cameras in 1966  
but probably only broadcast in B&W and never repeated in colour until TPTV  
did so. Jimmy Tarbuck was the compere and The Seekers were one of the groups  
performing.

Results were a bit variable: there was a lot of variation in contrast, hue  
and saturation between one camera and another, and one early camera shot  
resulted in horrendous mis-registration of colours, and that camera angle  
was not used any more in the broadcast.

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Yes, doing the maths (which I can't be arsed to do now, but I remember  
working it out when I was doing Elec Eng at university), if there is a phase  
error phi, it cancels itself out on adjacent lines (which are two lines  
apart because of interlacing) and multiplies the chroma component by  
cos(phi) so you get a slight reduction in saturation but no hue shift.

I believe that some TVs displayed the lines as they were received (one with  
a positive hue error and the next with a negative hue error of the same  
value) and relied on the brain to average it. Other more elaborate ones used  
a one-line delay and electronically averaged the two lines so the same  
colour info (with no hue error) was output on both lines.

I remember a friend's parents had a Hitachi TV which had a hue control, even  
though it was designed for UK PAL broadcasts. This was because Hitachi avoid  
paying a licence fee for using the delay mechanism which was patented, and  
instead converted PAL to NTSC and decoded it using a non-standard 4.43 MHz  
NTSC decoder - so a hue control was required to correct any hue errors that  
may occur and which would have been corrected automatically in a "real" PAL  
TV.  


Re: Problems with 2160p files on 4k screen
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Ah yes! I'd forgotten about those delay lines. The early glass ones were the
size of a tobacco tin, but when they got on to using ceramics that shrunk down
to a credit size area about 5mm thick. Eventually they got it down to an 8 pin
DIL chip!

--  
W J G


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