pi 3 wifi query

A quickie - does the pi3's on-board wifi operate independently of the
wired ethernet to give two separate network interfaces, or is it a case
of using one or t'other?
Thanks.
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
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It's a separate chip, so they will operate independently. It's up to you (or the software you choose) how to configure them.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
Very clear, thanks. It's beginning to look a viable alternative to the atom box that's chuntering away 24/7 warming the room.
Anyone seriously running freebsd on the pi3? I did try building some of the ports on my old model B.... but it was a bit like watching anti-climb paint drying :-}
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
Do the pre-built images work?
formatting link
Reply to
Hils

I'm told that it'll need new firmware from the Pi github and a replacement kernel that knows about the Cortex A53's cache - I'm not sure if there is a prebuilt one as yet.
Theo
Reply to
Theo Markettos
Thanks for the replies.
I thought the new one was backwards compatible with the old hardware - sounds like that's not true for the kernel then.
From a quick trial there seemed to be a paucity of prebuilt packages; building even a small one from the port was ssllooww. I was intending to use freebsd on my old pi to make a small web server; in the event, I switched to raspbian. I can't do that for my main home -server.
Maybe I'll hold off for now :-{
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Mike Scott (unet2  [deletethis] scottsonline.org.uk) 
Harlow Essex England
Reply to
Mike Scott
So potentially cheaper than an AP and more flexible too.
Ethernet and WiFi together can be quite useful for extending networks.
Cheers
Dave R
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Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box
Reply to
David
[]
Yes, but couldn't you do that with an RPi 2 as well? Mind you, I never tried, it was always one or the other....
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Cheers, 
David 
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Reply to
David Taylor
It can be done on the 2B. I've seen a software hack that supposedly works.
Reply to
Charlie
USB and 100mbps ethernet. Runs openwrt and works just peachy. In fact I'm running a more uptodate kernel on it than my Pi/Jessie setup.
Reply to
mm0fmf
Link or it didn't happen :-)
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Windows 8.1 on PCSpecialist box
Reply to
David
formatting link

USB->Ethernet adapter that included the p&p.
4mb Flash 32mb ram 350Mhz MIPS CPU USB2 device controller 100MB ethernet 2 gpio controllable Leds a few more gpio pins available (need to solder) Uart pins (needs 3.3V level shift and need to solder) 150mbps 802.11n Wifi (The wifi signal is much stronger than any of the USB wifi dongles I have on my Pi)
Open-wrt has this device as a MIPS profile, so you get the Open-wrt build system from their git repo. Select this profile (MIPS, A5-V11) and type make and wait a bit. Out pops a couple of image files you can pass to the existing router software to upgrade it to Open-wrt.
Don't get me wrong, the Pi (all flavours) are wonderful. They fact it has encouraged young and old to have a play and make things using the Pi is priceless. But you can get dedicated hardware for buttons from China. The MIPS chip and the Wifi chip in these things is effectively obsolete so the chips are cheap. Cheap as chips!
Reply to
mm0fmf
For slower devices perhaps, but the Pi3 only has 100Mbit Ethernet and Wireless-B/G/N neither of which it* is capable of saturating.
*
At least for the Pi2, I haven't fully evaluated my Pi3 yet, but I'd be surprised if the USB hosted networking was significantly faster than on the previous model.
I wouldn't consider deploying anything other than gigabit Ethernet and Wireless-AC these days, the difference is staggering, particularly if you are punting stuff around between machines and a NAS, rather than just accessing your broadband.
---druck
Reply to
druck
I don't get your point. The Ethernet goes through a USB connection on the pi card. I doubt you would see much of a difference if the 100 Mbps were bumped up to 1 Gbps. The USB will be a bottleneck not much faster than the 100 Mbps.
What is Wireless-AC btw?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
Which is why I'm saying I wouldn't use a Pi as a network bridge.
Very much faster wireless in the less crowded (but shorter range) 5GHz band.
---druck
Reply to
druck
How short is "shorter" range? Most wi-fi routers only range 30 feet or so in reality. Heck, a friend has one that her niece can't pickup on the next floor some 15 feet away with her iphone. Are we talking having to be on the same table?
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
Odd! my wireless adapters work for over 100' in unobstructed areas. Now inside a steel reinforced building is another story.
Reply to
Charlie
Depends on the obstructions, mostly. 2.4 penetrates walls (way) more easily.
Reply to
A. Dumas
What does "unobstructed" mean? You mean outdoors with no wall, no trees, *nothing*?
I've tested my wi-fi router by walking outside where the signal has to pass through a glass door and it only goes some 30 feet. Walls block signals more, floors a *lot* more.
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Rick
Reply to
rickman
wire meshed render and foil backed plasterboard kill it stone dead.
Long Live CAT 5!!!
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Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead  
to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher

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