Adding VS Code to Pi

But remember Windows tends to use far more memory to do the same thing than most linux distros. So windows users have a different sense of memory needs than linux users.
Jim p.s. I am not knocking anything with this comment.
Reply to
Jim Jackson
Loading thread data ...
Emacs is now a gui editor!
Reply to
Jim Jackson
I've been using source code control as a minimum since that meant SCCS and shell scripts (mid 1980s), even coming bang up to date with git doesn't eat much resources.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
... and I use a GUI version of vi (and it's not gvim either).
--
Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
How else would I have had an ARM to play with? Other than the second processor for the Beeb, and I did know someone who had one of those, I think he had every second processor. He also got an early Archimedes, with the Arthur operating system. I waited for RiscOS and bought one with a massive megabyte of memory, and added a 40MB hard drive. Later upgraded to ARM3.
The nice thing about the Acorns was a decent BASIC with a built-in assembler. I eventually bought a PC and was astounded that I had to *buy* a useful programming environment, all it came with was GW BASIC, which wasn't great. I took the Delphi path, which is why I've never more than dabbled in C.
--
Joe
Reply to
Joe
I don't think you read what I posted, Martin. I use RISC OS.
David
Reply to
David Higton
Get yourself a Raspberry Pi, install RISC OS on it, and enjoy those pleasures again - but the OS and the BASIC have had the benefit of many years of improvement since the Archimedes days.
David
Reply to
David Higton
I missed RiscOS. Apologies, but if you can port rsync to it, that could be worth doing, for the backup speed you'll gain.
Apart from that, what I had to say about update frequencies and (especially) syncing system updates with backups and not trusting backups to SD cards should apply regardless of the OS: I learnt most of that from working with mainframes and early UNIX systems and find its equally relevant for systems Linux or any other OS. -- Martin | martin at Gregorie | gregorie dot org
Reply to
Martin Gregorie
I understand you, and I know RiscOS is available for the Pi, but I don't think I could go back now. The enormous memory, being able to run (most) BBC games much more smoothly, the speed of that first hard drive... none of those things mean much now.
I assume you can no longer cause mayhem by dropping a directory into itself: I did that accidentally, turned off the power after the machine hung, and found an (apparently) infinite series of nesting... I fixed it, studying the filesystem and writing a recursive bit of BASIC to plumb the depths of the nest and delete it level by level (the OS wouldn't touch it), but I wasn't too impressed that such a thing was possible.
OK, RiscOS in those days was half a megabyte of ROM (no bugs allowed). I remember my first PC: Win95 was about 25MB in size, and it did more than the RiscOS of the day, but to be fair, not fifty times as much.
--
Joe
Reply to
Joe
I wonder why I moved to Linux!
--
Chris Green
Reply to
Chris Green
Re: Re: Adding VS Code to Pi By: Theo to Ahem A Rivet's Shot on Sat Feb 13 2021 11:27 am
Have you seen Geany?
Reply to
Phigan
I've used it before. What's notable about it? I didn't really explore, but it looked to me fairly basic - like a slightly fancier version of gedit.
Theo
Reply to
Theo
well it understands blocks in various languages and highlights things appropiately.
But what do you mean by 'editor'
I wouldn't use it to write a book in.
--
?It is dangerous to be right in matters on which the established  
authorities are wrong.? 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Re: Re: Adding VS Code to Pi By: Ahem A Rivet's Shot to The Natural Philosopher on Tue Feb 16 2021 11:09 am
For the record, I am using Wordgrinder for books and short stories. You get to write the piece using generic styles (header 1, paragraph, blockquote, etc) and then you can export it to easily parseable formats.
--
gopher://gopher.richardfalken.com/1/richardfalken
Reply to
Richard Falken
Dana Tue, 16 Feb 2021 02:24:59 +0000, The Natural Philosopher napis'o: [snip]
Why not? Even vim is enought to write any book in LaTeX.
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic
You could probably do that in Edlin.
But there's a big difference between 'enough' and 'I would use it by preference'.
--
Joe
Reply to
Joe
Dana Tue, 16 Feb 2021 09:28:39 +0000, Joe napis'o:
But I do prefere vim and I do prefere LaTeX for anything that needs to look right... as a proper document or a book. And yes, I do prefere keyboard over mouse. :) It's faster!
Reply to
Nikolaj Lazic
Doesn't do drop caps, automatic index, illustrations, and emphasised text.
I wouldn't write a book in Latex, either
Exactly. Why make more of a rod for your back then you have to.
--
?It is not the truth of Marxism that explains the willingness of  
intellectuals to believe it, but the power that it confers on  
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
Yes, we all know a proper vi user uses h j k l instead of cursors, so they don't move their fingers from the touch typing default position.
Back in 1995 the team I worked on was allowed to switch c++ development from unix/vi to the Microsoft C++ IDE, pretty much everyone switched.
For Latex try TexStudio.
Reply to
Pancho
There's a 1300 page A4 sized reference book on my shelf that was prepared on an 80286 based XENIX machine[1] using sqtroff, shell scripts and vi. While this was being done that machine was also being used to maintain a database with two people doing data entry and another running regular queries and reports.
[1] Not a PC clone - an Altos with a couple of 80186s acting like channle controllers on a mainframe.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith                          |   Directable Mirror Arrays 
C:\>WIN                                     | A better way to focus the sun 
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ahem A Rivet's Shot

ElectronDepot website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.