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Re: Good Hardware Tools
On 2020-11-18 12:40, Tauno Voipio wrote:
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Sometimes described by saying that the "US is inching its way towards  
the metric system."

Re: Good Hardware Tools
Am 18.11.2020 um 13:51 schrieb Niklas Holsti:

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The term "inching" may no longer really doing it justice.  Let's do some  
(metric) math on this.  The total of the borders and coastlines of the  
mainland USA is roughly twenty thousand miles, or 32 thousand  
kilometers.  And it has been 154 years since that decision.

So to travel around the entire mainland US since then, the average speed  
would have been, roughly:

    208 km per year,
    570 meters per day, or
    24 meters per hour

For comparison a turtle is reported to be going 330 m/h.  It could thus  
have run circles around the mainland U.S.  Like: literally 15 times around.

Or, speaking of "sluggish": an actual slug (i.e. a garden-variety snail)  
can clock in at around 3 m/h.  That's fast enough for it to have "run"  
the entire U.S.-Mexico border in that time faster than the U.S.A. took  
to cross from the silly to the sane side of same.

It's a paradox: a country that was founded on the very principle of  
abolishing, with prejudice, everything British is now just about the  
last one on earth still sticking to these fundamentally British  
Imperial(!) units --- except Great Britain itself.  Who in turn just  
won't agree with the French on anything if they can possibly help it.

Re: Good Hardware Tools

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That's not /quite/ accurate.  Amongst the things that the Americans
disagreed on was spelling - but it wasn't the Americans that changed
words like "colour" and "neighbour".  It was the British who changed
them - by adding some unnecessary extra vowels to make the words look
more French-like.

And the UK has long ago given up on imperial units for anything where
accuracy is relevant.


Re: Good Hardware Tools
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Automotive speed limits in every country I've visited are posted in
miles per hour or kilometers per hour.  Metric units would of course be
meters per second (100 km/hour is about 28 m/sec).

Me, I support switching to the FFF (Furlong-Firkin-Fortnight) system.
For example, the speed of light is about 1.8e12 furlongs per fortnight.

;-)

Re: Good Hardware Tools
On 18/11/20 20:45, Paul Rubin wrote:
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I rather like pi seconds = 1 nanocentury, to about 0.4%.

"I'll just be a few nanocenturies, dear".

Re: Good Hardware Tools
Am 18.11.2020 um 22:08 schrieb Tom Gardner:
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And the speed of about one nano-lightyear per month is what you need to  
complete a 3-hour Marathon.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
On 11/18/20 3:45 PM, Paul Rubin wrote:
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And one attoparsec equals one decifoot to engineering accuracy, proving  
once again (if any more were needed) that God is an Englishman.

The original definition of the metre was 10**-7 of the distance from the  
Equator to North Pole measured along the meridian of Paris.  Both ends  
of that line are at sea, of course, like so many other French  
initiatives. ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Good Hardware Tools
On Wednesday, November 18, 2020 at 3:45:52 PM UTC-5, Paul Rubin wrote:
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I c.  

--  

Rick C.

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Re: Good Hardware Tools
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I'm sorry, the number you have dialed is an imaginary number.  If you
think you have received this recording in error, please rotate your
phone by 90 degrees and try your call again.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
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Actually not true. Kilometres are metric. Perhaps you are getting  
confused with the measurements in MKS system?

Re: Good Hardware Tools
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Hours are not metric, or at least are not SI.  I can go with kilometers
per second but those numbers would inconveniently small.  MKS and CGS
have been obsolete for decades.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
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As we do not use Kiloseconds or Megaseconds, Hours as the accepted and  
understood multiple of seconds is a suitable standin, if not SI.  
Kilometres / Hour is the metric equivalent of Miles / Hour.
Or are just being a pretty boring pedant, and probably wrong at that?
Or am I missing a joke?

Re: Good Hardware Tools
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It's partly a joke and partly pointing out the silliness of those who
ridicule the US for not using metric.  Kiloseconds and megaseconds are
metric units of time, hours are not.  Yet people (even in supposedly
metric countries) use hours because they are comfortable human units.
Those countries use meters and hours, so they are only partially metric.

In the US we do the same thing, but even further.  We also use hours
(3.6 kiloseconds), but it also uses feet and inches (inch = 2.54
centimeters).  People from other countries who act superior about this
should get their own house in order (i.e. switch from hours, days, years
to kiloseconds, megaseconds, etc.) before complaining about ours.  1
year = 31.5 megaseconds, 1 century = 3.15 gigaseconds.  Let me know when
you have updated all your history books to use those units.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
On Friday, November 20, 2020 at 8:01:07 PM UTC-6, Paul Rubin wrote:
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Given that the computers which operate our banks, do GPS positioning and coordinate time zones all use binary, expect some day for AI to impose:
2**20 meters between the north pole and the equator, 32 inches per meter, 32 millimetres per per inch.  2**16 seconds per day with 64 seconds/minute and 64 minutes per hour  ...
E.g. the English got it somewhat right: pints, quarts, gallons.  The French went decimal and now decimal is not cool.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
On Tuesday, November 17, 2020 at 5:28:23 PM UTC-5, Jim Jackson wrote:
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We don't use Fahrenheit in the US, we abuse it.  

--  

  Rick C.

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Re: Good Hardware Tools
On 17/11/2020 19:06, Paul Rubin wrote:
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I believe it's basically a case of hot air rising, cold air falling - it
means the cold air stays in better.  And this is particularly true when
the door is opened - with a standard fridge, cold air starts falling out
rather quickly.

I read somewhere that a Japanese manufacturer had invented a fridge
(with standard door and size) used about a quarter of the energy on
average, measured in real use in a home over a period of time.  The
breakthrough was to have a transparent door, so that people don't open
the fridge to see what is inside.  I thought that was a fine example of
thinking outside the box!



Re: Good Hardware Tools
On 11/17/2020 4:25 PM, David Brown wrote:
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Nah, inside the box was just too cold.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
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The interior volume of the freezer part of a standard fridge might be
around 50L, which would make the air mass inside around 60 grams.  So
even if all the cold air escapes instantly, that's fairly little heat
getting in, compared to the heat capacity of the other stuff in the
freezer, i.e. around 4 kg of ice in the case of my experiment with the
pot full of water.  The fridge part might be more like 200L so I'd agree
that the heat entering from opening the door several times a day could
be substantial.

It still seems to me that better insulation around the freezer would
help.  When I did the thing with the pot of water, I checked on it maybe
1x-2x day, not so much in the scheme of things.  The heat was getting in
through the insulation, not from opening the door.

Re: Good Hardware Tools
On Mon, 16 Nov 2020 19:31:28 -0000 (UTC), Brett wrote:

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It can really save money. My 21 year old 210/85L cool/freeze Bosch
fridge failed, and it used 270 kWh/a (measured with an energy meter).
And that one was for its time very efficient, 6 cm think walls of the
cooling section. It needed one electronic repair on those 21 years.
The replacement Liebherr, slightly larger inside, saves about 130
kWh/a . I fully expect it to last 20 years.

Depending on your electricity price, it might not be a good idea to
keep an old fridge running.

Mat Nieuwenhoven





Re: Good Hardware Tools
On Monday, November 23, 2020 at 7:39:35 AM UTC-5, Mat Nieuwenhoven wrote:
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What is kWh/a?  Is that per year?  The marginal cost of 130 kWh to me is ha
rd to estimate as I'm on ToU metering so it varies from $0.08 per kWh to $0
.33 per kWh.  The lower bound for the electricity savings would be $10.40 p
er year.  That's not very much.  An average cost considering the time durat
ion of the peak charges would be about twice that amount.  

If I could find a reliable timing device I would have the fridge not run du
ring the expensive peak times.  The longest peak time is 4 hours and I full
y expect the temperature to not increase significantly in that time.  When  

ld rise a lesser amount given the very good insulation they now have.  

--  

Rick C.

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