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Re: Philips ARM's (was 32-bit AVR)
Rick,

the 2124 / 2129 will be available in Q1/2004, so way ahead of the
SJA2020. I've seen a functional protoype board in a Philips training
made by Keil for these devices. This is supposed to be available ex
stock around Feb - 2004. No such thing in sight for the SJA 2020.

Cheers, Schwob

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Re: Philips ARM's (was 32-bit AVR)
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Are these external bus versions?  Are they sampling now?  Where can I
get a data sheet on them?

--

Rick "rickman" Collins

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Re: Philips ARM's (was 32-bit AVR)


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They don't have external buses. I got the data sheets from the Philips
web site.

Leon


Re: Philips ARM's (was 32-bit AVR)
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I have given it some thought, and I don't know that I actually need the
external bus if the chip is otherwise complete.  I can use a fast serial
interface to the FPGA to perform the data transfers for the ARM.  Most
of the data would really need to be between other sources so the ARM
would be setting up the DMA inside the FPGA.  So with a little thought I
could use one of the Philips chips.  But I don't think they will be
ready in time.  This project is late enough as it is :)

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Rick "rickman" Collins

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Re: Philips ARM's (was 32-bit AVR)
I think the rumour about the 32bit AVR is mostly true (reliable
sources)... perhaps we should also consider the cost aspect... there
would be no royalty payments on the AVR 32bit compared to what atmel
currently pays for manufacturing ARM cores.
Infact i have even heard something of initial tests with RT-Linux....
vik


Re: 32-bit AVR

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I hope you can make the single-die products with rather small
power consumption! We are currently using AT91R40008 +
AM29DL163 combination and would like to migrate to a single-chip
(not necessarily single-die) solution. However the Atmel
flash seems to draw huge amounts of current compared to the
AMD one. The processor itself is not very hungry.

- Ville

--
Ville Voipio, Dr.Tech., M.Sc. (EE)

Re: 32-bit AVR
The AT91R40807 will draw even less power than the AT91R40008 in deep power
down.
Only 136 kB and 33 MHz operatino though.

The AT91FR40161 = AT91R40807 and AT49BV16x4,

will reduce the power down current compared to the AT91FR40162
It will use the same flash though.
The ARM processors can draw a lot of current when tristated, It is good to
pull up the databus
to avoid that.

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Best Regards
Ulf at atmel dot com
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Re: 32-bit AVR

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Yes. But I am mainly interested in minimum maximum power consumption.
I have a fixed (small) amount of milliamps available. And then it turns
out that the flash is the bottleneck. Reading the program into SRAM
takes more power than anything else.

It seems that Atmel is behind its competitors in this respect.
Integrating the two dies should eliminate the pin drivers and
thus reduce the power consumption but at the moment the lowest
consumptions seem to be obtainable only by using Atmel processors
and someone else's memory.

- Ville

--
Ville Voipio, Dr.Tech., M.Sc. (EE)

Re: 32-bit AVR
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power

I think it is a tradeoff between cost and size.
2 MB of integrated flash is quite expensive to integrate.
Atmel have had 128 kB of Flash integrated with ARM on a single die for 3-4
years.
Not standard circuits though, only ASIC.

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If Maximum power consumption is an issue, then you can do some tricks.


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Best Regards
Ulf at atmel dot com
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Re: 32-bit AVR

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The AT91RM3400 is the first Atmel ARM standard MCU without an external bus.
This downloads the code from external SPI Flash, TWI EEPROM or
from a serial port using the UART or the onchip USB Device.
You do not need to have any flash in the design if you download the app
using the
UART or USB.


The part has 96 kB SRAM for code and data and 256 kB boot ROM.
Atmel has loaded the ROM with the boot mechanism and other stuff,
so it is not expected that most customers will change the ROM.

Executing from SRAM is low power and allows S/W breakpoints.




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Best Regards
Ulf at atmel dot com
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Re: 32-bit AVR
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The Intel and Atmel flash parts do consume a lot of current.  The AMD
parts are much less, both active and standby.  Our design uses the OKI
ARM chip with internal flash for its own use and we also need external
flash for the DSP and FPGAs.  Since no one is executing from this flash
we can use a NAND flash part.  Turns out this is even lower power not to
mention much lower cost.  So consider the OKI ARM chip and if you need
more than 512 KB flash, a NAND flash part is ideal.  

--

Rick "rickman" Collins

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