Old Panasonic PF-2201 Loses Color

Well, I've had an older VCR unit for maybe 20 years, and now it seems only capable of playing tapes in b/w. Am I missing something about settings? The problem started recently. The last time I used it was six weeks ago. I can plug another vcr into the same TV and out comes the expected color.

Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA) (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time) Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

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W. Watson
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Try news:sci.electronics.repair for help on this. It is probably plugged up video heads, but ask the people who fix them for a living.

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Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

Of course, they might really first read the FAQ for sci.electronics.repair, which is at

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Even if that doesn't answer the question, it at least gives the poster some of the same language to ask a question.

Michael

Reply to
Michael Black

Ah, good suggestion. I'll clean the heads, and repost if need be.

Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA) (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time) Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

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                "There is more to life than increasing its speed"
                            -- Mahatma Gandhi
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Reply to
W. Watson

There are several possible causes, but if the VCR was in regular use all those 20 years, the most likely reason is that the recording/playback head has simply become worn out and needs to be replaced.

The actual R/P points are two or more tiny chips of very hard ferrite material, and protrude slightly from the drum. Each bit has a microscopic magnetic gap in the center. Over time, friction with the tape gradually grinds down the chips and they no longer make proper contact with the tape. The magnetic gaps also become wider.

These two effects of wear and tear result in a reduction of the tiny electrical currents generated at the heads, especially at the high frequencies. Color is often the first to go since the high frequencies carry the color information. Careful observation will also reveal reduced sharpness in the picture.

The whole assembly, including the aluminium drum, should be replaced - if it's still available. Replacing the head is a straightforward job for a technician, but some mechanical and electrical alignment may also be necessary. The alignment process is a bit tricky and requires some skill and experience.

Reply to
pjdd

Interesting. Thanks, but I'll forgo that exercise. I have two others that I can use for this purpose. Two are new.

I reposted in repair.

Interestingly, when I used a Scotch VHS tape cleaner, their SCOTCH logo came through in yellow. However, trying a commercial tape with color produced b/w again. Probably time to junk it.

Wayne T. Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA) (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time) Obz Site: 39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet

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                "There is more to life than increasing its speed"
                            -- Mahatma Gandhi
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Reply to
W. Watson

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Check to see if it records ok. If it does it is not the heads. The chroma is lower in frequency on the tape.

Reply to
GPG

look for a color switch on the back of the vcr.

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   Jasen
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jasen

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