Nokia - Page 2

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary

Translate This Thread From English to

Threaded View
Re: Nokia
On Sun, 08 Sep 2013 10:28:57 -0700, John Larkin wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The two basic problems with OTPs: the problem of transportation, and the
generation of statistically random data.

"Fortunately, it was more pseudo than random". - The late Tony Sale,
speaking about the Lorenz cipher machine, and Colossus.

--  
"Design is the reverse of analysis"
                   (R.D. Middlebrook)

Re: Nokia
wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

An electronic thing, using a zener diode or opto shot noise or Johnson noise,
will work. Use a few of them, and post-mix and scramble the data.

People sell USB random data generators that have passed various tests for
crypto-grade randomness. If you're really paranoid, do all the encode/decode
operations on a laptop PC that has no network connection.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

What I find annoying is the endless mix of arbitrary and confusing user
interfaces, which have nothing to do with technology as such.

I *hate* the incredibly stupid user interfaces on my Audi and our microwave
oven. I ripped out the "smart" thermostat in our cabin and put in a dumb analog
dial one, which has no internal states to get tangled.

It's funny when some idiot newspaper refers to kids as "tech savvy" when all
they have learned is how to push buttons on smartphones.

Quoted text here. Click to load it


I'm an iPad widower; I have lost my wife to a fondleslab. She runs apps, does
email, reads books, all that.  

I have enough real PCs in my life, six or so, connected via Dropbox, that I
don't need more gadgets. I can *program* a PC, do serious engineering, and run
LT Spice and Filterpro and Appcad and pcb layout and all that stuff you can't do
on a pad. We have a really cool parts/inventory/datasheet database that runs on
PCs too.  

Offline, I scribble on paper and read real books.



--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 10:10:40 -0700, John Larkin

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That is more or less coalescing along the Apple/Android lines.
  
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Cars are still way behind cell phones, here.  They'll catch up (likely
going with a cell phone like interface).  I really like our "Nest"
thermostat.  The web page is pretty crude but the device itself is
quite easy to use.  AIUI the Nest was designed by ex-Apple types.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's the apps.  ;-)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's TERRIBLE.  She reads books?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If I could carry that power in my pocket, it would be great.  However,
I need more than two displays at work, neither of which would fit.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Don't see the difference.  I prefer dead trees, too, but perhaps
because I haven't trained myself to read eBooks.  OTOH, I print
datasheets and store them in project binders (some datasheets get
printed several times).

Re: Nokia
On Sun, 08 Sep 2013 12:04:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

On the iPad. It glows. Kinda annoying, when I'm reading a proper dead-tree book.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Decades from now, the printed books will still be around.  

I don't print data sheets or keep a lot of printed project notes any more. I
photograph whiteboards, photograph breadboards, scan notes, do calculations in
text files, and save all that to a project folder, which gets backed up
extensively. But still on PCs with big screens and mice. I've run out of
bookshelf for project binders.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia
On Sun, 08 Sep 2013 09:21:27 -0700, John Larkin

Quoted text here. Click to load it

You read dead tree books in the dark?  ;-)

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Decades from now, I won't be reading them.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I can't read a datasheet from a monitor but it's nice to be able to
search them.  Notes are easy enough, now, on the e-versions.  I like
to have all of the datasheets for a project at my fingertips, without
having to fumble through directories on my PC.  My boss even made a
note on my last performance review about how well organized I was
(even though my desk is always 8" deep in papers - and my bench, worse
;-).  

Re: Nokia
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 10:10:40 -0700, John Larkin

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's like complaining about the different typefaces and styles in
book.  Even if they were printed in Olde English font, you could still
read it.

I use 4 major operating systems and probably about 10 of their
mutations.  Every one has a different user interface.  Some are better
than others, but all of them have their problems.  I have the most
difficulty with the currently fashionable "swipe" and "gesture"
interfaces.  

However, none of the common user interfaces have much to do with the
technology.  Their purpose is to hide the technology from the user,
not to educate the user in the use of the technology.  The ultimate
example is the common ATM banking machine.  It has plenty of features
buried under a dumbed down user interface that anyone can easily
decode.  Incidentally, I noticed that the banking machine at the local
market was running on NT 4.0.  I guess banking isn't into the latest
and greatest.

Also, the only way to progress in user interfaces is to throw a user
interface at the GUM (great unwashed masses) and see what happens.
Some kid invented the highly successful inertial finger swipe system
for Apple, not a committee of experts on standards.  The new Windoze 8
"metro" interface is actually quite good, if you don't mine forgetting
everything you've previously learned about operating a computer.
Applications add another layer of creative user interfaces.  Yeah,
it's a mess, but it will eventually sort itself out, where what's left
is what is generally accepted and possibly usable.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, that's the advantage of designing your own.  You can have it
exactly the way you want it.  Well, you can have as much of what you
want until you run out of time and patience.  Incidentally, I still
cannot do more than the basics on my office setback thermostat, even
after reading the manual.  Some things are just not meant to be
understood by mere mortals.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

What would you propose?  Give them an abacus or slide rule instead?

I like to think of smartphones and computers in general as a means of
hiding complexity.  Usually, it's the math and methodology that gets
hidden.  Why bother learning how simple interest operates, when you
can just plug the numbers into a spreadsheet or Javascript form, and
out comes the answer.  The kids are considered "tech savvy" because
they can rapidly produce the required answer without have a clue what
is happening behind the scenes.  Worse, they often accept the answers
produced, without a sanity check.

However, you're right that they're not really "tech savvy", unless the
definition of "tech savvy" has changed to being able to operate a
smartphone.  Kinda like being able to play flying video games makes
them "aircraft savvy".

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I know many couples that both have tablets.  I asked one yesterday how
they deal with the tablets as a distraction from reality and
interaction.  Tablets are banned from the dining room table, from
parties, and from restaurants.  A quick lookup is all that's
tolerated.  

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I have about a dozen or more.  I also use my customers computers quite
often.  Total immersion in computers is not a good idea.  For many
years, computers were banned from the house.  But that didn't last.

You probably don't need more gadgets, but you might need better
gadgets.  A more portable PC, as in a tablet, is a better computer.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

True.  A tablet is really made for viewing content, not creating it. I
would not bother trying to do a simulation on a tablet.  However,
viewing the results (possibly in PDF form), reading the docs, skimming
through books on the topic, and searching for clues, are perfectly
acceptable.  While it is quite possible to create content on a tablet
or smartphone, it's much better for viewing.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

So, login to your office PC with some remote desktop software such as
Teamviewer, and run the office PC from your tablet.  I do that all the
time.  Time burners like virus scans, updates, simulations, compiles,
and ripping are best done on high powered desktops.  However, there's
no need to actually be in the office, sitting in front of the desktop
waiting for the job to finish.  Just leave and stay connected via a
tablet.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm not much of a programmer.  One of the reasons is that I learned to
program on a Model 33ASR teletype machine.  I would prepare my punch
card desk on a card punch, feed it to the card reader, have the
computer grind the program, and print the program and results on the
teletype.  Roll forward 45 years and I find myself printing my program
on the laser printer, marking corrections with a red felt tip pen, and
typing in the corrections using a line oriented text editor (vi or
vedit).  Old habits die hard.

Paper and books will eventually be dead or unaffordable.  Already,
most of the trade journals and magazines that I constantly devour have
gone to online publications, eBooks, downloading, PDF's, etc.  I can't
claim that these electronic methods are much of an improvement, but
they do have some big advantages; you can carry your library with you
and they're searchable.  I have trouble finding my paper scribblings
and while I still read printed books and materials, find something I
read even a few days ago is often difficult.  Also, they're cheaper.

Perhaps paper and printed material is adequate for your purposes
today.  However, I doubt that will be the case in the future.  I'm not
suggesting that you rush out and buy the latest tablet or smartphone.
Just don't write them off as unusable or useless until after given
them a fair chance and experimented with one.

To be fair, I was offered a used Asus quad core something 10" Android
tablet at a good price.  I tried to fit it into my lifestyle and
failed.  To big, to awkward, too fragile, too much overhead, and full
of bugs.  I also had issues with the user interface.  I returned it.
However, when the next generation of tablets arrives, I plan to try
again.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's the journalists that are hopeless. They can't tell a million from a
billion, and get anything substantive all tengled up.


Quoted text here. Click to load it


I program apps in PowerBasic, the PBCC flavor, which lets you do windows apps in
minutes, with the work concentrated on the math, not the Windows interface.
Works great.

Wanna design Bessel LC filters quick?

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/53724080/Circuits/Filters/BESSIE.ZIP


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I usually break any portable device that has an LCD screen. I carry my current
phone in my pocket with all the other junk and it's unbreakable, so far. It has
survived any number of ski crashes.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia
wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not so much.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The problem is inconsistency.  Cell phones are settling down.  Cars
and microwaves, not so much.  Every one is different.
  
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Banking, like many such industries (e.g. industrial automation), has a
long qualification time.  Those NT4 stations probably were OS2 in
their last life.  How long does NASA or the IRS keep hardware/software
around?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Nonsense.  That's how we get blinking VCRs.  User interface design is
not "throw it at the wall and see what sticks".  ...or at least it
shouldn't be.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

GACK! <hair on fire!>

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Oh, yet another UI to learn.  No thanks.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

STANDARDIZE.  Computers are appliances now.  They should work like a
stove (NOT the other way around).

<snip>

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's the way we operate.  I don't have a tablet yet.  I can't
convince myself that I'd use it.  OTOH, my wife really bought a Nook
before the bottom fell out, so she wants the HD+ 10"(?).  It's only
$150, so she might buy it and I'll take her hand-me-down 7".  If I
like it, I'll go from there. For $150, why not?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Silly.  I bought the IBM employee "first-day-sale" PC.  My son was
three at the time.  It was a great tool.  Wouldn't be without one.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not convinced but we'll see.   My first impression is that it's niche
(between a cell phone and laptop) is too limited to be of great use.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not sure.  Dead trees are better for reading.  Laptops better for
searching.  Where does the tablet fit in?  Sales? Sure. Engineering???

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Keyboard?  Mouse?

Quoted text here. Click to load it

;-)  

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I scribble on paper because that's how I remember.  My penmanship is
write-only but it helps me remember.  If I write notes (or
appointments), I will remember them.  Otherwise, not so much.

Detailed notes that I have to remember, I type, but that requires a
keyboard.  Tablets just don't cut it.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Fair enough.  I'll try a Nook, because they're cheap.  If I find that
I actually use it, I'll go for something more expensive.  I'd prefer
to run Win, though (so not cheap).

Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Nokia
Martin Riddle wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Some nice detailed reviews would do. But there aren't any to write home
about. Plus the carriers need to be involved, that's key. AFAIK mine has
 lots of Android and some with iOS, that's it.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Nokia
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 13:05:18 -0700, John Larkin

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yep.  I learned that lesson in late 1987.  Windoze 2.0 was about to be
released and Microsoft was doing everything they could to get
independent hardware suppliers onboard, including substatial OEM
discounts if they bundled Windoze 2.0 with the hardware.  We wrote
drivers and sent them off to Microsoft.  We put together a marketing
plan, OEM and retail packaging, demos, and advertising awaiting the
promised release data and the deliver of pre-ordered Windoze packages
to go with the hardware.  A few weeks before the release, Jon Shirley,
prez of Microsoft casually announced that the deal was off, and that
Microsoft no longer needed the hardware suppliers since they already
had all the drivers that they needed.  

Nokia is no better, but I can't talk about that incident.
I guess MS and Nokia deserve each other.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

As Bill Gates famously told the CEO of a company that he destroyed, "You made
one mistake; you trusted us."


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

The entire story of Nokia is a tragedy. They are good at opening up a
market but keeping market share is not their strong point. They used
to make rubber boots, TVs, etc before mobile phones.

The only thing Microsoft is good at is integrating their software into
one package which -more or less- works together for a very low price
(compared to their competitors).

--  
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia
On 09/06/2013 06:40 AM, Nico Coesel wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Such as Linux? ;)

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you do the real math of an 'open source' product in a commercial
environmend then Microsoft usually offers the solution with the best
bang-for-your buck. For example: A commercial Mysql license is more
expensive than Microsoft SQL. The same goes for their Exchange server
suite (e-mail, calender, web-mail).

Microsoft messes up every odd Windows release and getting into
embedded systems isn't working at all for them but they do have
reasonable office automation products.

--  
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 15:44:47 +0000, Nico Coesel wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's as much a choice of DB as it is "doing the real math".  For example,
Postgresql is truly free (including for commercial applications), and
arguably has greater data integrity.  How 'open source' MySql might be is
increasingly in doubt as Oracle now owns it and seems hard at work making sure
it won't compete with its flagship DB.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They are certainly widely used.  Of course, they have some serious flaws -
e.g. don't trust their backward compatibility.  My IT manager routinely
recommends the free OpenOffice to read old *docs (originated with Word)
that the latest Word can't understand.

I actually have to give MS some credit for changes to their OS.  They've clearly
tried to make advances (even if not always the right ones or well executed) rather
than just polishing the old one.  This kept their majority position until the game
simply dissolved and a new one was formed.


Re: Nokia
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Yeah, but mysql is for weenies.  If you want a serious database use  
postgresql.   (the price is better too)
Biased video here:  http://www.infoworld.com/t/sql/video-postgresql-succeeds-where-mysql-fails-225874

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I can't say I've had any positive experiences with exchange, possibly
because I don't know how to operate it.

--  
?? 100% natural


OT: Motherboards was Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it
  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  
Quoted text here. Click to load it
  
Phil, sorry to go off-topic, but I need your help.

Do you know of any LGA1155 H77 or Z77 motherboards that will run Ubuntu  
10.04LTS?

I have several system that I'd like to upgrade, but I have had a terrible  
time trying to find a suitable motherboard. I have spent weeks sifting  
through reviews and product documentation and found very little support  
for Linux.

The Asus P8B WS claims compatibility, but $270 is a bit much. It also  
means dealing with the legendary Asus non-support if problems occur. If I  
can't find anything else I may have to go with it.

I tried two motherboards: Asus P8H77-I and Asrock Z77 Pro 4.

The Asus has a place in the bios to turn off EUFI but it doesn't work.  
Ubuntu won't boot no matter how many variations I try.

The Asrock boots fine but requires special Windows drivers to enable the  
sound, and it does not display LM Sensors so you can't read the cpu  
temperature. I contacted their support group. The said Linux is not  
supported and to run Windows.

MSI, Gigabyte and ECS all say the same thing.

I tried Ubuntu 12.04 with the Unity desktop. It lasted about 10 minutes.  
I reinstalled 10.04 and threw the CDROM away.

I'd be happy to run any other distribution that works like 10.04. This  
means pull-down menus, Synaptic Package Manager, Firefox, and compatible  
with VirtualBox 3.2 and 4.0. It would also be nice to be able to run VLC  
but that is not mandantory.

Any suggestions would be very welcome.

Thanks

JK

Re: OT: Motherboards was Re: Nokia

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Use the ASRock and toss in a separate, cheap-but-supported sound card?
I'd guess that one of the Creative cards might work.

Not sure what would help on the sensors. Surely they use SMBus but I
guess it's routed through one of the support chips.

I just did a new system build with an ASRock Z77 but haven't tried
Linux with it, yet.  

Re: OT: Motherboards was Re: Nokia
On 9/10/2013 3:40 PM, John K wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sorry--I'm not a big PC hardware expert, I'm afraid.  When I need a new  
box I call up Aleksandr at Alvio and give him my credit card number.  
Two machines for me and one for a client so far, no worries.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

Site Timeline