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http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/09/05/microsoft_nokia_garbage_trucks_colliding/

Have you noticed that everybody who allies with Microsoft suffers for
it?


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com
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Re: Nokia
John Larkin wrote:
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They could still make it work. But it would require major changes on the
part of Microsoft. Instead of a "mee, too!" product such as a 3rd iOS or
Android they should concentrate on the more professional users because
the consumer market is gone for them. What do they want? Most of them
want seamless transfers of computing tasks. If, for example, I could do
some simple what-if or filter simulations on LTSpice right on a smart
phone they would have me.

They also need to analyze why Windows CE became screwed up, and soon.
Before it happens again, only this time in a more expensive way. Some of
the reasons I could tell them because I was one of the guys who turned
away from CE when we needed an embedded OS.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Nokia
wrote:

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I've hear the Windows phone arent that bad.  I don't have one, and I'm
not going to buy one to find out.  And that's exactly what the problem
is.

Cheers

Re: Nokia
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 18:39:47 -0400, Martin Riddle

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And they redesigned Windows to look and behave just like a phone that
nobody wants.


--  

John Larkin         Highland Technology, Inc

jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com
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Re: Nokia
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 16:02:09 -0700, John Larkin

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<http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/phones
I suggest you either try a Windoze phone, or ask someone who has one
what they think.  You may actually want one.

Frankly, I'm impressed with the device.  The OS doesn't crash (some
lousy apps do crash), it's fast, it's responsive, easy to use, and has
an adequate battery life:
<http://forums.wpcentral.com/nokia-lumia-900/190239-do-windows-phones-crash-much.html
Apps are behind, but the selection (170K) is barely adequate but
should improve.  20K apps were added in the last 12 months:
<http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/featured-apps

It takes about 2 years for sales to ramp up on any new phone.  That's
because the typical subsidized phone contract is 2 years and the
average life of a smartphone is about 18 months.  As older phones are
recycled and replaced by newer models, I expect Windoze phone sales to
increase somewhat.  
<http://www.forbes.com/sites/ewanspence/2013/09/02/windows-phone-market-share-up-around-the-world-but-american-sales-still-weak/

The problem with the Windoze phone is that Microsoft is late to the
party.  They're in the same position as computer vendors were coming
up against IBM in the last century.  Buying IBM was considered safe.
Competitors needed to have a substantial price or performance
advantage over IBM in order to get the sale.  That's where Microsoft
is today.  Unless the Windoze phone can offer a price, performance, or
feature advantage, sales will continue to lag behind Apple and
Android.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Nokia

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My phone has two functions: it makes calls and it gets calls. I think maybe it
has a calendar, so that would be three.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

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Re: Nokia
On 06/09/2013 04:39, John Larkin wrote:
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I think it was a lame attempt at subliminal advertising, but rather than  
make people love the Dozey phone it made them hate Win8.

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But the number of apps for Dozey phones is miniscule compared to the  
offerings on Android or Apple - iff you *want* a smartphone that is.

Personally I find their incredibly short battery life worse than  
useless. My retro dumb phone a Nokia 6303 will last a couple of weeks on  
one charge. If I had the uglier 6310 it would be even longer. My wifes  
smartphone never manages two days without crashing into its low battery  
warning panic. It also seems to include the antenna "design" from hell -  
poor signal where the dumb phone sees the network just fine.

A curious thing is happening in the UK where certain old models with the  
very best functionality and battery life are holding their value in the  
secondhand market. Nokia has recently launched a couple of products  
really intended for the third world with cheap plasticky cases but good  
frugal power management and a couple of weeks operational ife per  
charge. But the premium market at present is all for fancy toys.

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They are still below weak in the UK too. Android and Apple has the  
market sown up. Though Nokia were struggling before their involvement  
with Microsoft - it could well be a marriage made in hell.

Interesting that the announcement of Mickeysofts CEO Ballmer drove the  
share price higher by 14% last week. Irrational exhuberence in the city  
seem to think that they are better off with no-one steering the boat.

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I am with you on this one. Though you need to add the additional feature  
of a long battery life in standby and in use!

--  
Regards,
Martin Brown

Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 08:00:18 +0100, Martin Brown

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I charge mine once a week or so. There are lots of cell sites around here, so it
doesn't burn a lot of transmit power. And I must spend a minute or so per week
talking. It's a Verizon "The Rock", which mean it's unbreakable. I keep it in my
pocket with keys and knives and stuff, and you can literally toss it down a
flight of stairs with no ill effects.

I had a hard time getting the Verizon sales guy to tuen off everything but POTS.
No texting, no missing call nonsense, no webby stuff.  

I almost took out a pedestrian last month. I was turning right, and he was
standing in the middle of the intersection, texting, oblivious of the big red
DON'T WALK light thing.

And I almost collided with a bicyclist who was texting.  

Restaurants don't need lighting any more; every table is covered with open,
glowing smart phones.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

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Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 07:20:45 -0700, John Larkin

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I have the LG VN251.  Only needs charging about every 10 days.

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Same here.  I had to get nasty to get Verizon to kill that annoying
backup crap of theirs.
  
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It's a sad reflection of what family is all about anymore...

Some weeks ago we're in Spinato's, a semi-upscale pizzeria.

A family is seated at the table next to ours... father, mother, son,
daughter... each one had their own "smart" phone, each one busy at
some task... NOT ONCE did they speak to each other.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--  
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
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Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 08:47:20 -0700, Jim Thompson wrote:
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Common occurrence these days.  I started noticing it a couple of years
back going to lunch with work colleagues.  We would all sit down, say
a couple of words, order, and then out would come the phones.  No
discussions of current events, work issues, nothing - just people  
"conversing" with their phones.

"I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction.
The world will have a generation of idiots"

Said to be from Albert Einstein

--  
Chisolm
Republic of Texas

Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:44:10 -0500, Joe Chisolm

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Bringing up our family, it was a rule that you had to sit down and
have dinner with the whole family, no grabbing something from the
'fridge and running off with your friends.  If there was some neighbor
kid present, they either had to go home, or sit down and have dinner
with us.  A point of hilarity was one neighbor kid who would come into
the kitchen and query, "Mrs. T, What's for dinner?"  (Made him eat
liver and onions a couple of times.  He's still a friend of the
family, and that was ~30 years ago ;-)

Now, unfortunately, my own granddaughters stray into la-la land with
their phones.  But I chide them, and they stop most of the time.

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Occasionally I think I could use a smart phone, for the GPS features
and looking up shopping/restaurant locations.  But I resist due to the
costs.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--  
| James E.Thompson                                 |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations                               |     et      |
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Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 11:09:06 -0700, Jim Thompson

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It's a slippery slope, but they're hard to live without once you take
the plunge. If you forget to program an address or write down a phone
number you can look it up just about anywhere. See or hear something
of interest- jot it down, or photograph it and look things up
instantly. Easy to price compare right in the store. Streaming audio
means you can listen to podcasts or radio programs in the car from
anywhere. It doesn't quite substitute for a real GPS, though some
people think so. It might substitute for satellite radio.  

Mine cost whatever the unlocked phone costs ($600?) plus $60+ per
month, (plus half again the phone cost for an encounter with H20). But
you have a perfectly usable camera, e-mail, IM, GPS, notebook, access
to the entire world's internet information etc. 24/7. And I can tether
to my iPad or notebook computers, so they are instantly internet
enabled too. Sometimes I even make telephone calls with it!  

BTW, it's kind of fun sitting with an iPad while reading a good
old-fashioned book with a lot of substance and being able to look up
unfamiliar flora and fauna, locations, cultural references etc. as you
go. Just reading "Quest for Ore", a classic on mineral exploration
from the sixties, written by the son of one of the pioneers of
exploiting the great Mesabi Range iron ore formation near Lake
Superior- and a veteran of prospecting world-wide.  


Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 15:10:33 -0400, Spehro Pefhany

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Agreed.  They do become indispensable. However, that doesn't mean
you're forced to give up human interaction when you have one.  We go
out for meals at least two or three times a week.  The only time I
pull the phone out is while waiting for a table (I don't feel like
private discussions in a crowd of strangers) or when I want to look
something up that's come up during discussion.

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My contract will be up soon.  Looking at the prepaid plans, I'll
probably use the same phone on one.  Verizon has an unlimited phone
and text plan, with 2GB data for $60/mo.  Not too bad.

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My wife prefers eBooks (she loves her Nook).  I haven't gone there.
...but if I need to look anything up, I have my phone.  I haven't
figured out a "use case" where I want a tablet.  The 4" screen is too
close to a small (7") tablet and full tablets are too big to carry
everywhere.

Re: Nokia
Jim Thompson wrote:
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Vivid memory from an Italian family, from before cell phones were
invented: Everyone sits down at the table, dad says the prayer. Pots get
passed around, the usual. One of the kids starts to talk to another kid
during dinner. Dad slams his fist on the table ... *NON PARLATE!* ...
only the clanging of forks and knives is heard during the rest of the
dinner. Immediately afterwards everyone started chatting and laughing,
then it was ok.

[...]


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He may be right.


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And _you_ call _me_ cheap? It can be had for 35 bucks flat rate,
includes 300 minutes talk/month.

Except I only need 10 minutes so I have the $7/mo no data deal.

--  
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

Re: Nokia


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If you want an interesting bit of reading, locate a copy of Ray
Bradbury's short story collection "The Golden Apples of the Sun", and
read "The Murderer".  Bradbury describes (in beautiful detail) the
acoustic and social babble and distraction which fills a society
thoroughly hooked on instant, always-on communication to everyone and
anyone.

Bradbury accurately predicted the cellphone/smartphone culture... and
he did it back in 1953.





Re: Nokia
On Fri, 06 Sep 2013 08:00:18 +0100, Martin Brown

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Consider that nail well whacked.

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I broke down and got a smart phone 18mos. ago. My "killer app" was the
WiFi hotspot but since I've had the phone the app I can't do without
is Navi.

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I've always charged my phone once a day.  It's part of the routine. If
I waited until the battery was dead, it would be.

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Function takes power.  It's the same for laptops.

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Ah, that's too bad...

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The anti-Jobs?

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Not by a long shot. I'm not one to jump on every latest technology fad
but this one is here to stay.  The only reason I got cell phones to
begin with is that two were cheaper than a land line.  Smart phones
give me something more than a phone I rarely use.

Re: Nokia
On Thu, 05 Sep 2013 20:39:01 -0700, John Larkin

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I've noticed that people who are immersed in technology at work, tend
to adopt a low tech approach to their personal lives.  While not
exactly a Luddite, there are some benefits to remaining low tech.  I
think I've reached a workable compromise.

I carry two devices.  I have an ordinary LG VX8300 commodity cell
phone.  It makes and receives phone calls and has an address book
copied (indirectly) from my smartphone.  I have several almost
identical VX8300 phones scattered in various locations, in case I
forget or lose my phone, which seems to be a regular event.  *228 and
a few buttons, and the backup phone is usable.  $10-$20 used on eBay.
The VX8300 was one the last phone made with an external projecting
antenna, which give better range than internal antennas.  That's handy
in the Santa Cruz mountains.

I also carry a Motorola Droid X2 smartphone, with the cell phone
section turned off.  It's main uses are a calendar, address book,
camera, RPN calculator, GPS maps.  It holds a mess of apps that I've
downloaded, some of which I've run more than once.  The reason for two
phones is that I don't need or want a $30/month cellular data plan.
Verizon will not activate a smartphone without a mandatory data plan.
I switched to prepaid via PagePlus several years ago, which has no
such restriction.  However, I plan to buy a somewhat larger screen PDA
to replace the Droid X2, so I've left the two phone arrangement in
place.

Some of the technical apps are genuinely useful.  Audio oscilloscope,
audio spectrum analyzer, Wi-Fi sniffer, path loss calculator, and
various calculators and table lookups.  I use VoIP apps in areas where
cell phone service doesn't function.  I have the phone crammed full of
videos, podcasts, and music, but rarely have time to watch or listen.  
I don't expect that you'll adopt my methodology intact, but it might
give you some ideas.  You might find a PDA or tablet to be useful.  



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Nokia
On 9/7/2013 11:08 AM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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At various periods in my consulting career, I've had to be a bit of a  
road warrior.   At home, I do all the stuff that needs data security on  
my main Linux box, but on the road I'm in hotels and airports with  
unsecured networks, so my default assumption is that my laptop is  
compromised.   Having a Blackberry allows me to do stuff requiring data  
security on the road, which is very comforting.  (Of course with  
everybody being eavesdropped on by the Feds limits there's a limit to  
how comforting it can be, but I'm looking into alternatives, mostly Kolab.)

iOS and especially Droid aren't in the same class for data security.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--  
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal Consultant
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Re: Nokia
On Sat, 07 Sep 2013 11:38:50 -0400, Phil Hobbs

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That's one of my major problems with using a smartphone or PDA.  I've
had various apps steal my address book and use it to generate spam.
I've had to limit the entries in the official address book to a few
common phone numbers, and hide the rest in a encrypted separate file.
I use Truecrypt (open source) because it runs on just about
everything.  There are several ports of Truecrypt for both IOS and
Android.  

For email, anything of importance gets encrypted with Enigmail (Open
PGP).  I doubt if it will stop the NSA but it's sufficient to
frustrate casual data thieves.

I do little traveling these days, so portable data security is not an
issue for me.  However, I do use coffee shop wi-fi networks, where
there is no security.  For those, I have a VPN router at my office and
sitting in a server farm.  It's not end to end encryption, but it does
take care of the sniffing problem at the wi-fi hotspot.  There are
also a few commercial services but I prefer to do my own.

My biggest fear is losing a smartphone or tablet, where it takes
little effort to extract everything.  So, the important stuff is on a
removable micro-SD card, much of which is also encrypted.  I usually
remember to remove the micro-SD, but one time I forgot.  I then
misplace the smartphone.  After a quick panic and search, I went
online and tediously changed about 100 passwords.  Then I found the
smartphone sitting on the kitchen table.  Oops.

It's Sunday.  It's also a great day to drive to the office and do all
the things I should have been doing last week and which are due
Monday.  For overtime pay, I'll buy myself an ice cream.



  
--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Nokia

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One-time pads are practical nowadays, what with memory sticks costing almost
nothing per gigabyte. You would have to physically send someone a duplicate
stick, full of random data. Each communication could start with a plaintext
index to the start of the XOR data, but don't use any region twice and don't
leave the stick plugged in. A simple drag/drop app would be easy; encryption and
decryption are the same operation.

Then we could get millions of people to send bogus random data files to one
another, just to keep the NSA boys busy.


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I might go in later today and build another prototype or something. It's nice to
be alone, without someone barging in every 20 minutes, shouting numbers.

I can stop by BevMo on the way in, stock up on Wexford and Purple Haze and Ron
Zacapa 23.


--  

John Larkin                  Highland Technology Inc
www.highlandtechnology.com   jlarkin at highlandtechnology dot com    

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