Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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I was looking at some old Intusoft newsletters from 1997 this morning, and was
impressed with how in-depth and useful they were.  Oddly, though, if you go to
Intusoft's web site, there's a lot of information that looks like it's pretty
old, and the newsletter that once came out every 2-3 months now seldom comes
out more than once a year.

Meanwhile there's PSpice, which had most significant new development stopped
somewhere in the acquisition chain of MicroSim->ORCAD->Cadence.

I'm starting to get the impression that, other than LTSpice, there's very
little new development going with SPICE simulators today.  (Even Kevin Aylward
of SuperSpice fame doesn't hang out here much anymore... :-) -- and SuperSpice
definitely had its own small list of really neat, unique features.)  I suppose
they've become mature enough that there just aren't that many more low-level
features to add other than an occasional new model, but a lot of them
(including LTSpice) could sure benefit from higher-level features such as
Smith chart displays, the ability to use S/X/Y/Z parameter, impedance probes,
automatic loop gain plots, and so on -- features available in a few packages
here or there, but not at all universally.  (And sadly, given LTSpice's focus,
I doubt they'll ever make it to there as well -- LTSpice's graphing abilities
are quite spartan compared to any of the good commercial packages... although
I'm not complaining, given that the cost is $0.00.)

Oh well.

I would be interested to hear from people who've used Intusoft's ICAP/4  --  
especially how it compares to, e.g., PSpice.

---Joel


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
On Thu, 10 Mar 2011 13:17:01 -0800, "Joel Koltner"

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Both Cadence and Mentor have been systematically killing off the
competition by buying them up and letting them die a slow death by
leaches ;-)

Though Meta Software still hangs in there with HSpice.

Also many bigger semiconductor houses have their own proprietary
simulators, though they almost always have crap for post-processing.

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I tried ICAP/4 long ago.  I wasn't impressed.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Perhaps they could eventually at least agree on an output format, so that
post-processing tools could be universal.

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Darn.  Too bad -- it looks pretty good on paper.

Here's an interesting 2004 reminiscence from Nagel himself on SPICE:
http://www.cs.sandia.gov/nacdm/talks/Nagal_Larry_NACDM2004.pdf

---Joel


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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"Leach" is a verb.

Hope This Helps!
Rich


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Another simulation program currently in development is "Gnucap", the
progeny of Al Davis.
It's hobbled by some incompatibility with current Spice packages, but
is supposed to
have some interesting capabilities.  It's freely available on Linux
{don't know about WinX}

Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
On Fri, 11 Mar 2011 00:53:13 -0800, Rich Grise

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Ignorance is NOT a virtue.
        
                                        ...Jim Thompson
--
| James E.Thompson, CTO                            |    mens     |
| Analog Innovations, Inc.                         |     et      |
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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   Neither is living in a leachfield, but some people seem to thrive in
them.


--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a Band-Aidô on it, because it's
Teflon coated.

Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Well, it seems I'm equally hated by Thompson, Terrell, and Sloman.

I couldn't be more proud!!

Cheers!
Rich


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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Thought it was a blood sucking grub ;)

Grant.
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
wrote:
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Rich was pointing out a spelling error.  Shortly he'll be going after
punctuation, so everyone put on your foil beanies.

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

--
Dr Philip C D Hobbs
Principal
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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On 11-03-12 09:48 AM, Phil Hobbs wrote:

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I wear mine shiny side out...

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/leach



mike
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Yes, being the self-appointed chief of the internet spelling, grammar,
syntax, and punctuation police is a thankless job; it's somewhat akin
to trying to hold back a tsunami with a ping-pong paddle. ;-)

Thanks,
Rich


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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That's "leech," and they're not grubs, they're full-on adult wormlike
things; grubs are usually beetle larvae.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=define%3Aleach

Did you know that one way to tell if lakewater is safe to drink is to
determine if there are leeches in it? (they won't live in polluted
water.) ;-)

Hope This Helps!
Rich


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Hmmm. No wonder leaches are rare.

John

Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Well, besides it being a verb, they're not all that rare - a "leach field"
is another term for a "drain field," which is used in lieu of a cesspool
in sewage systems.

Cheers!
Rich


Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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A cesspool and leach field are entirely different things.  A leach field
removes the liquid from a septic tank.  There is no septic tank in a system
with a cesspool.

Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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Well, yeah, one is a leaky tank that releases the clarified water from
the septic tank into the ground, where it's filtered by Mother Nature
and returns from the aquifer. A leach field is just a big network of
leaky pipes that spreads the clarified waste water over a larger footprint.
It must have been safe, because we had a hand pump on our front porch that
we drank from.

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It's odd that you would say such a thing - when I was a kid, that's exactly
what we had - a septic tank (which needed the sludge pumped out
periodically) followed by a cesspool, which is tantamount to a drain field,
but takes up less real estate. (the water leached into the ground, was
filtered by Mother Earth, and went into the aquifer.)

Then again, we were on a wooded lot; Mom used to let me tag along when she
went out into our woods to pick wild asparagus. And stuff _did_ grow wildly,
because our toilet waste was very nutritious for the plants!

Hope This Helps!
Rich



Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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In the usual terminology I've heard (here in the U.S.) the difference
is somewhat larger.

A "cesspool" is, as you say, a leaky tank or well.  It receives sewage
*directly*, and the sewage liquids leach directly from the tank into
the soil... it's a one-stage sewage processing system.  They are in
disfavor here in the U.S., because they are more prone to leak raw
sewage into the local water table without adequately bio-processing it
(i.e. the risk of E. coli ending up in the ground water is
significant).  Also, they tend to clog up over time (and can thus
overflow or leak) because the solids in the sewage are discharged into
the soil, and will eventually plug up the pores in the soil and stop
the drainage.

A "leach field" is the second part of a two-stage sewage processing
system - it's coupled to a "septic tank".  The septic tank is a
anaerobic digestion and settline/filtration system, which separates
out and biodegrades most of the solid material rather than discharging
it into the leach field.  The undigested part of the sewage ends up as
sediment in the bottom of the tank, and must be pumped out
periodically.

The risk of pathogenic bacteria ending up in the water table is
greatly reduced, and if a sufficiently large leach field is used the
lifetime of the system can be quite a few decades.

I believe that some two-stage systems use a septic tank (anaerobic)
and a "leach pit"... the latter being a separate pit which serves the
same function as a leach drain field.  If I recall correctly, this
approach can only be used in areas of high-drainage soil (e.g. very
sandy)... in areas of lower soil drainage you must spread the leaching
out over a larger field with pipes to avoid saturating the soil and
turning it into a nasty swamp.  In any case, a "leach pit" in a
two-stage system is a very different beast than a "cesspit", as the
former receives water that has undergone first-stage treatment in a
septic tank, and the latter receives raw nasty sewage.

Some older homes and communities do still have cesspools, but in most
parts of the U.S. there are significant restrictions on them... new
ones cannot be built/installed, and you sometimes have to replace a
cesspool with a good septic-tank system (or a city sewage hookup) in
order to sell the property to a new owner.

--
Friends of Jade Warrior home page:  http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
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Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?

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No, a "cesspool" is essentially a hole in the ground the raw sewage runs into.
There is no septic tank to separate the solids.  

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That wasn't a "cesspool".  A cesspool takes the sewage directly; no septic
tank.  A leach field can either disperse the liquids into the ground or
evaporate it in the air.  The key is that the solids have been separated.
There is no separation with a cesspool.


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Many nutrients are water soluble.

Re: Did SPICE development cease around the turn of the century?
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Well, maybe they taught me the wrong terminology - in our Anoka, MN house in
the 1950's, we had a septic tank, whose liquid output went to a leaky
tank that everyone called the cesspool.

Maybe what we called a cesspool should have been called a "leach tank" or
something.

Thanks,
Rich


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