Re: help - 1N34 diode substitute?

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He'll be really grateful if he has been.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

if love is a drug, then, ideally, it's a healing, healthful drug... it's
kind of like prozac is supposed to work (without the sexual side
effects and long-term damage to the brain and psyche)

Re: help - 1N34 diode substitute?
On 23/04/2021 05:06, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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Suggesting silicon diodes as substitutes for a germanium signal diode is  
pretty daft too.

--  
Brian Gregory (in England).

Re: help - 1N34 diode substitute?
On Sunday, August 29, 2021 at 10:07:35 PM UTC-4, Brian Gregory wrote:
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Hot carrier or Zero bias diodes work well, and have better specs but they aren't cheap. They are made for microwave mixers and detectors

Re: help - 1N34 diode substitute?
Michael Terrell wrote:
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With a bit of bodging, something like a BAT15-03 (<$1 in onesies, 21  
cents in reels) ought to work at least as well as a 1N34A, assuming that  
a 4V rating is enough, which it ought to be for an RF detector.  (1N34As  
work up to something ridiculous like 60V).

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Re: help - 1N34 diode substitute?
On Friday, September 3, 2021 at 5:36:16 PM UTC-4, Phil Hobbs wrote:
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is  
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ey aren't cheap. They are made for microwave mixers and detectors  
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I suppose the 1N271 is obsolete, as well? Microdyne had switched to them fr
om earlier pat numbers in the late 1990s.

There are Ebay listings for 1N34 diodes. I had a pound of them, from Poly-P
aks, but an animal dug a hole under the wall into my shed, and used them to
 make a nest. Needless to say, the several thousand diodes had their leads  
rusted away. I still have some that were salvaged from some '70s era comput
er PC boards. They were daughter boards with individual flip flops, and the
y had silver mica capacitors. I can't imagine the price of something like t
hat, back then.

Another trick is to DC bias a diode to give it closer to a zero volt forwar
d drop. This was done in some radios in the early days to improve sensitivi
ty. I had to scratch my head the first time I saw that trick, with a 6H6 du
al diode vaccum tube.

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