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Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 6:22:43 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:
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te:
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least 'healthy' water on the planet.  
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 return/10% fresh air. The return air is freighted with whatever is in the  
house/building/whatever that passes through typically very coarse filters.  
So, dander, dust, bacteria, grease, and whatever virus is in circulation. T
he fresh air could have very nearly  
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heir own right. Even if anti-mold tablets are utilized, *THAt* chemical is  
no fun either.
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Yeah, but what are the odds a Legionnaire will be using a steam iron?  But  
in all seriousness, wasn't it the AC duct work that was thought to be the b
reeding ground for the bacterium?


Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Tuesday, 13 February 2018 23:29:26 UTC, John-Del  wrote:
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e least 'healthy' water on the planet.  
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0% return/10% fresh air. The return air is freighted with whatever is in th
e house/building/whatever that passes through typically very coarse filters
. So, dander, dust, bacteria, grease, and whatever virus is in circulation.
 The fresh air could have very nearly  
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 their own right. Even if anti-mold tablets are utilized, *THAt* chemical i
s no fun either.
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t in all seriousness, wasn't it the AC duct work that was thought to be the
 breeding ground for the bacterium?

Legionnaires bugs are killed by heating above 60C.


NT

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 8:40:00 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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And, were Legionnaires' Disease the only issue (it is not), then condensate
 water might be just fine. But it is not. Again, impregnating one's clothes
, sheets, and so forth with concentrated allergens, concentrated fungicides
 - or the actual spores of same - and various other materials, easily avoid
ed, is simply stupid. Advocating such behavior repeatedly in the face of ob
vious evidence otherwise is both stupid, and possibly criminal. What you do
 in your own house with only you as the victim is up to you. But visiting s
uch idiocy on others, friends, family and so forth, is *NOT* up to you.  

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA  


Re: Removing battery corrosion
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...
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But in all seriousness, wasn't it the AC duct work that was thought to  
be the breeding ground for the bacterium?

Perhaps more likely to be indulging in ex-st[r]eam ironing? More  
seriously, I think shower heads have been implicated too.

Mike.

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On 2018/02/11 4:51 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
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No, no, NO! Sorry Peter, you missed this one. And your advice is  
normally spot-on!

Batteries use an AKALAINE (a base not an acid) so using another alkaline  
product (baking soda) will only exacerbate the problem.

To neutralize a base (alkaline battery leakage) you need to use a mild  
acid. Get some white vinegar and mix with distilled (if your water is  
hard) water 50:50 and use that solution to wash the residue away and to  
stop incipient leakage from continuing.

I wrote up a page back in the late 90s after talking with an engineer  
from EverReady about battery leakage:

http://flippers.com/battery.html

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Um, again you are recommending using a base to try and arrest the action  
of another base... Lye is a strong base, and bases are what are used to  
etch circuit boards, eh?

Running circuit boards through dishwashers can be fine, just skip the  
detergent! Seal DIP switches, pots, relays, etc. first...

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John :-#)#

--  
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
                      John's Jukes Ltd.
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
This is a vintage transistor radio, likely using a carbon-zinc battery (LeC
lanche Cell). They use an acid-based electrolyte. As carefully detailed. La
tter-day batteries *tend* to use alkaline-based electrolytes - making most  
of the discussions herein accurate. But - not in all examples of all cases.
  

I try to advise based on good chemistry based on the data as presented.  

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On 2018/02/13 5:23 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
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Crap, right, as the OP stated zinc-carbon battery using either ammonium  
chloride or zinc chloride in the electrolyte which are indeed mild acids  
and thus you are certainly correct to recommend using a base material to  
neutralize it.

Should have realized you wouldn't make that sort of mistake and double  
checked my own assumptions.

Sorry!

John :-#(#

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Sunday, 11 February 2018 10:53:57 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com  wrote:
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I did one yesterday, got what I could off some bent flat strip with a screw
driver, got the remainder off with a grinder. A dishwasher is more often th
e suitable treatment, but as has been said there are some parts definitely  
not dishwashable. Speakers, unpotted relays, variable caps, paper caps, tra
nsformers, some other stuff.


NT

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Sun, 11 Feb 2018 04:52:51 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com wrote:

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I use 409 spray cleaner, a plastic scraper, and a paint brush.  For
alkaline cells, scrape off as much of the white powder as possible.
Clean what you can with the small paint brush.  Then attack with the
409 spray.  It will evaporate dry in about an hour.  If you have an
air compressor, you can blow out the excess liquid and it will dry
quicker.

It's been so long since I've seen any equipment that uses a carbon
zinc cell, that I don't recall how it's cleaned.  Probably some
alkaline cleaner.

The most common problem I see are corroded battery springs and
contacts.  Once the plating is gone, it's difficult to keep them from
corroding again.  Grease helps, but makes a mess.  So, I replace them
with similar or identical spring contacts purchased on eBay and other
online vendors:
<https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=battery+spring+contact


--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
Since this layer is alcaline, the best to use an acid ; vinegar for  
instance.


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Re: Removing battery corrosion
wrote:

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<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaline_battery#Leaks
Yep.  The white stuff from an alkaline cell is potassium carbonate and
has a pH of about 11 in water:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_carbonate
Vinegar works, but citric acid (lemon juice) smells better.  If the
cleaner produces gas bubbles, it's working.  However, I don't think it
matters much.  I use 409 household cleaner which has a pH of 9 to 11.5
depending on concentration:
<http://www.gjfood.com/pdf/msds/79_820040.pdf
It produces some bubbles, does a good job of cleaning, and smells ok.

The white stuff that leaks out of carbon zinc battery is the zinc
chloride electrolyte:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinc%E2%80%93carbon_battery#Durability
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zinc_chloride
Zinc chloride in water is very acidic with a pH of 2.0 to 3.0
depending on concentration.  It's very soluble in water so any water
based alkaline cleaner, such as houshold ammonia, should work.



--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
wrote:

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Oops.  Zinc chloride is the crud that leaks out of the battery.  The
electrolyte is ammonium chloride.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
On 11/02/18 23:38, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Zinc chloride actually attracts so much water that it dissolves in it,
as I found out when I tried to crystallize the stuff.

Jeroen Belleman

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:31:54 +0100, Jeroen Belleman

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What were you trying to make?  Soldering flux (usually a mix of zinc
chloride and hydrochloric acid)?  Don't use it on electronics as it's
conductive.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
Jeff Liebermann wrote:
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Nah! Just part of a high school chemistry course 45 years ago.

Jeroen Belleman

Re: Removing battery corrosion
wrote:

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That's acid plumbing solder for copper pipes.

But you brought up a question. Electrical solder is rosin. What exactly
is roisn and how does it work for a flux? Is it the same thing used for
playing a violin, which as far as I know, is made from pine tree sap?


Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Monday, 12 February 2018 10:41:52 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@tubes.com  wrote:
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that's what it is. Just take pine resin & heat to drive off the volatiles. You can get 25-50kg resin per tonne of wood pulp, but only from pine. Spruce gives less.


NT

Re: Removing battery corrosion
On Mon, 12 Feb 2018 03:00:35 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Yep.  I've made my own rosin flux.  Lots of instructions online for
both paste and liquid flux:
<https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+make+rosin+flux

However, things went awry when I tried to use my home made flux for
reflow soldering a BGA chip.  It was too thick and too difficult to
clean after resoldering.  When I dissolved it in some alcohol to thin
out the solution, I had a small fire.  It also disappeared long before
the solder melted.  I ordered "reflow flux" which is designed for
reflow soldering, which worked much better:
<https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=reflow+flux
Such fluxes are either active or mildly active.  Such rosin fluxes
contain abietic acid  
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abietic_acid
which acts as an oxidation inhibitor.  Other additives break down when
heated and produce hydrochloric acid or ammonia for the same effect.
You could mix your own formulation, but I suggest buying the
commercial product when dealing with anything that requires
temperature control (such as BGA chips) or thorough board cleaning.

--  
Jeff Liebermann     snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D    http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Re: Removing battery corrosion
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yes that's the stuff.

what it does is when heated decompose into acids which dissolve oxides,  
and into hydrocarbons which reduce oxides back to clean metal, all of
which which helps the molten solder to wet the metal.  

--  
This email has not been checked by half-arsed antivirus software  

Re: Removing battery corrosion
The older method is the metallic brush and some elbow oil !
It is efficient.



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