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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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the company I worked for in MA had everything in a big relational
database (stock control, RMAs etc). the guy who controlled it was
dyslexic. For the first year or so, If I wanted a part it was quicker
for me to walk to the production building and browse thru the stockroom,
looking in boxes, than to try and find things using the database.
Eventually I learned how he routinely mis-spelled things, and could then
use the database. My CEO didnt seem to think it was a problem.

I also did a time-and-motion study of the RMA area, where my buddy Bob
fixed stuff. He is an amazing tech, far quicker than I'll ever be. time
to fix - typ. 10-15 mins. writing up the form - 5 mins. typing in the
resultant data - 1~2 hours, hunt-and-peck. My suggestion - hire a
(pretty) school leaver who can type, and pay her minimum wage to type up
his written docs. The implemented solution? 2 more techs....

Cheers
Terry

Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 10:49:55 -0800, John Larkin

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That might be true if you define literacy by the ability to read
printed text, which would of course exclude all blind persons. At
least I would consider a person capable of reading Braille and type to
be literate.

At least where I live, the birth rate of severely mentally handicapped
children incapable of learning to read or write is _well_ below 1/100,
even 1/1000 seems to be a high figure.

Since the literacy rate is supposed to be a measure of the
effectiveness of the education system, thus, once literate, always
literate, so unconsciousness, alzheimer etc. should not effect the
literacy rate.

Paul


Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot

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have
think
One of the problems is  the level of literacy.. can you read a university
level book or Doctor Sues.. both are levels of literacy (if at the extreme)

Simon



Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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   Now, this is funny!  You talk about literacy, and then you get the
name wrong. It is Doctor Seuss, who's real name was Ted Geisel.

--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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... or indeed "*whose* name was" etc.

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com



Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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   Yes, I missed it.  On the other hand I was limping between two
buildings and working on five computers at the time.  I had stopped for
a quick lunch and didn't take time to proofread it.  I just hit "Send"
as I hurried back out the door.

--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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Apologies - just struck me as ironic in context ;).

Steve
(also limping, and also working on five computers)
http://www.fivetrees.com



Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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   No problem.  I am starting to lose my close-up eyesight to diabetes,
and have to depend on the spell checker. I have severe carpal tunnel
(The VA and Shands hospital doctors tell me the surgery won't help me)
so I have to type with just a couple fingers.  That causes me a lot of
spelling errors.  I get so busy trying to make sure the spelling is
correct that I sometimes forget to check the syntax.

--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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Sorry to hear it. Good luck.

Steve
http://www.fivetrees.com



Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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   I have come to the conclusion that I'll just have to live with it as
long as I can still take care of myself without outside help.  The one
thing I really miss is reading real books.  I have to put a book on my
flatbed scanner, then blow it up on my computer screen to read it
without getting a headache.  I have read as many as 10 paperback books
in a single day when I was younger.  I was an avid Sci-Fi fan when I was
in my teens and early 20s and read just about anything I could get my
hands on.

   Like Art Linkletter once said, "Old age isn't for sissies!" :)


--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 18:33:14 GMT, the renowned "Michael A. Terrell"

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There are devices that have a camera mounted vertically with a monitor
overtop, used for people who have poor vision, but they cost several
thousands of dollars (small market) if you can't get a subsidy on
them. I wonder if you could do the same thing with a decent camera and
an inexpensive monitor. It's got to be better to just move the book
around under the camera than waiting while the scanner whines and
grinds its way through each frame.

There are also dedicated reading machines such as the Xerox "Reading
Edge" which will read books aloud with fair success (you have to get
used to the text-to-speech 'accent' they have).


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..."                          "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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   The ironic part is that I used to service those vision enhancement
systems back in the '80s, and about 10 years ago I let someone talk me
into selling him my last "C" mount close-up lens.  I have a pile of used
monochrome NTSC video cameras and monitors, both B&W and Color, but I
have not been able to locate a good lens that I can afford.  The only
Veterans I know that got any help from the VA with the vision
enhancement systems all had macular degeneration and the VA sent someone
to pick the equipment up whenever one of them died.  I had a link to a
small CCD close-up camera that you could slide across a page and plug
into the video input of a color monitor, or a TV with video input, but
the link no longer works.  It was $200 to $250, US.  I saw the same
camera being sold a t a flea market, but they wanted $800 for it, and
didn't want to well it without the "Matching" $500 color monitor.  $1300
for maybe $350 worth of electronics.  All they did was sick a couple
cheesy labels over the OEM labels and mark it up almost a grand.  Sam's
Club even had the camera available, but it didn't turn up with their
sorry storefront search engine.


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--
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot

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Hm. Sounds like a good idea.

Cheers!
Rich


Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot

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Yes, I do; I would even say that this rate is very low.

    Best regards
    Piotr Wyderski

--
"If you were plowing a field, which would you rather use?
Two strong oxen or 1024 chickens?" -- Seymour Cray


Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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But have incomes really been increasing over the last 20 years?  My income is
essentially the same as it was five years ago (actually less) and I
don't have health benefits now as I did then (I contract off and on now).
...though I do have more free time at this point so I suppose you could say
this was a willing trade.  However, I talk to lots of people who really aren't
making more than they were five years ago and have less benefits.  To some
extent, I suppose this fall in incomes is inevitable given the global pressure
on wages.  But people in the US now certainly feel that things are less stable
than they were a decade ago (less permanent jobs, more temporary or contract
jobs).

As far as other ways the US is declining: Well one of the big ones is that we
have zero to slightly negative savings rates now.  That's not sustainable
longterm.  Sure our real estate prices have gone up in the last few years, but
that's mostly just paper gain (If you sell your house, you still need
somewhere to live so if you buy another house you end up paying more anyway).

Phil


Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
Hello Phil,

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Inflation adjusted, not lately (last couple years or so). We will have
to accept at some point that there will be some evening out in the
standard of living between the US and Asia.


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There are some folks who sold at the peak a half year ago and are now
waiting in a rental for the bubble to deflate.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot

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Many are using their one time exemption to flee, where the equity will
purchase
a home and business free and clear before the bubble bursts. Often this
is
retirement driven, as the taxes on the now million dollar family tract
home
are excessive. But increasingly I've seen engineers that have been
consulting
pickup their families and expand their business outside the tech hubs.
Pheonix
and Utah have seen a huge influx of people from Calif with a half
million dollars
cash in hand to buy high end properties, and it's created a huge bubble
in those
markets too. The Small Business grants/loans are now distributed by
state as
well, to foster distribution of high tech jobs into the non-coastal
areas to move
the jobs, offsetting unemployment costs, and other social services
costs, into
stale agricultural areas that have been declining for the last several
decades.

The whole alternative energies program has similar provisions pushing
targets
to distribute the production of solar, wind and other production
facilities away
from existing costal centers and share the job/revenue benefits across
the states
instead of centralizing it again.

The government is much more likely to help you in the form of tax
breaks,
incentive programs, and access to contracts if you get outside the big
cities.
So for those that want to follow the american dream and become a small
business owner designing, building or selling software or high tech
products
there is a good reason to consider taking your equity, buying a home
and
business free and clear, and following that dream nearly debt free,
worry free,
as compared to sitting on a million dollar mortgage that the banker
takes most
of your paycheck with.


Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot


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That is clearly a trend. I have seen folks move to places like Arkansas.
Nowadays the means communication are so excellent that it doesn't really
matter where you design stuff. There are clients that I haven't seen in
years but it never mattered.

The upside is that the move to a rural place can provide tranquility,
less stress and a re-focus on what the real values in life are. Plus
there is some great Americana to be found that I sorely miss in the
cities. Saloons, country music, a "real" main street that doesn't fall
dormant at night, people have time for each other, people help each
other, after a while you know almost anyone and they know you, and so
on. And nobody cares whether you drive a snazzy ritzy sports car or not.
In fact, all you might need is a pickup truck (to haul some farwood from
them thar forest...).

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
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Interesting mix.
The groupings I would have thought should be
Indian/Chinese/Japanese
US/Europe (east and west)

The innovations have come from all over. Just because there is a good
business climate for high tech in California does not mean the things
developed and produced there are necessarily invented there.

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Who is they?  If you mean the Indians, Chinese and Taiwanese the answer
is : was yes, is yes and no in that order. Salaries in India are I
believe rising and they are being under cut by China.

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Who is "our" this is an international NG.  The experience global.
Perhaps it is just that the Indian students are smarter and realise
there is much experience on this NG and hang out here. US student could
too.

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No. Many of the questions are answered by Eastern Europeans as well. I
know of several tools that are developed in Eastern Europe. They some
very good people. The Eastern Europeans have some of the best
mathematical and computing brains on the planet.

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who is "ourselves"?

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It is an interesting question. Part of the answer is to certify or
license engineers the same as in other professions. IE like the PE in
the US and other countries and the C.Eng in the UK and Eur. Ing in
Europe.

This means like Doctors, architects civil engineers there is a minimum
standard for embedded Engineers. IT also means the salary will stabilise
at a reasonable rate and be less effected by sweat shops and unqualified
people.

There are similar qualifications for technicians. This will help remove
the unqualified and raise the standard of the profession in general. The
problem is that there will be losers in the west as well.  There are
probably as many unqualified hackers here as there.

However it will improve the situation globally.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
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Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
Hello Chris,

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That would diminish the talent pool and be a very efficient method to
drive the last employer out of the country. BTW most if not all of
Europe has no license laws. Hardly anyone over there knows what a
Eur.Ing is, nor do they care about that.

Old rule: The more bureacratic hurdles, the less jobs there will be.
Proven time and again.


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So, a university degree is worthless and only some bureaucrats get to
decide who will have a job and who doesn't? IMHO, if someone has a
degree from a university that shall be enough of a qualification. What
difference would some license make?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

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